New answers tagged

2

By Rules-As-Written a creature with Blindsight still has disadvantage attacking an invisible PC because the disadvantage is called out as a function of the Invisible condition, not as a result of the normal disadvantage suffered due to not seeing a creature. The fact that the two features of Invisible ("Can't be seen" and "Have Advantage on attack and ...


2

The bonus varies with the number of times you are attacked (But a +2 cloak of protection should be of similar tier) As discussed in Sdjz's answer, if you need to roll a 10 to hit normally, rolling with disadvantage is equivalent to a -5 penalty (or a +5 increase to the AC), although if the normal target number is different then this approximation gets ...


6

Only the first target would influence the attack roll Against the first target, you either have advantage, disadvantage, or neither. You roll to hit them. The result of the roll is still one number, even if you applied advantage or disadvantage to determine that number. From "Making an Attack" (cut down for brevity): 1. Choose a target. Pick a target ...


5

The rules on Advantage and Disadvantage state: Sometimes a special ability or spell tells you that you have advantage or disadvantage on an ability check, a saving throw, or an attack roll. When that happens, you roll a second d20 when you make the roll. Use the higher of the two rolls if you have advantage, and use the lower roll if you have disadvantage....


15

How to make Cloak of Displacement less fiddly in play Conversion to AC deprives the player if a significant benefit: the reduction in chance to being hit with a critial hit as noted in @Sdjz's answer. The cloak makes it ~1/400 chance. No cloak is a ~1/20 chance. You can place the burden on the player to indicate "cloak on" or "cloak off" using a chip ...


6

Assuming a monster would need to roll a 10 to hit, +5 AC is a close approximation This can be seen by using this anydice program: output 1d20 named "normal" output [lowest 1 of 2d20] named "disadvantage" When comparing the outputs using the "at least" option, you can see that when having disadvantage, the odds of getting at least a 10 (so a hit) is 30,25%....


5

I believe using a token of sorts to symbolize if the player has the effect would be optimal. That being said if you absolutely want to change that you could do something similar to the advantage rules on passive checks (PHB, p. 177): If you have advantage, +5 to the roll. If you have disadvantage, -5 to the roll. If it seems powerful that's because it is, ...


2

As you go on there will be more and more PC options that grant advantage or impose disadvantage. Always roll 2d20, and ask if you need to apply advantage or disadvantage before you calculate the monster's total. You will need a system to distinguish which die is used in the "ordinary" case. The easiest is if you have different coloured dice, but even "the ...


14

Advantage or disadvantage is a binary state. Either you have it or you don't. The rules talk about multiple sources of advantage but, in the end, you simply "have advantage" or "have disadvantage" on the roll (or neither). The rules make it clear that a single instance of the opposite mechanic is enough to cancel the other: If circumstances cause a roll ...


12

Yes If circumstances cause a roll to have both advantage and disadvantage, you are considered to have neither of them, and you roll one d20. This is true even if multiple circumstances impose disadvantage and only one grants advantage or vice versa. In such a situation, you have neither advantage nor disadvantage (basic rules p. 60) If you ...


1

No, this doesn't work. The reason why has nothing to do with "double advantage", like some of the answers here claim, since your proposed process involves gaining advantage, losing advantage, and then gaining it again; at no point do you actually have Advantage twice. Instead, it's because there's no time between choosing to activate Rapid Strike and the ...


9

I have seen this at the table: but it's not an Easy Button The rules on giving circumstantial advantage are a great way to reward cleverness, innovation, and teamwork by the players as they try to set up situations where advantage would accrue. I had advantage awarded to my cleric for doing something a lot like that with Thaumaturgy, in our first campaign. ...


-7

By RAW, all 9 attacks get advantage First, lets establish that the rules do what they say they do, and there are no secret rules. The Rules for Advantage say: If multiple situations affect a roll and each one grants advantage or imposes disadvantage on it, you don't roll more than one additional d20. If you have advantage from 2 sources, you do not ...


15

No, you either get an additional attack or advantage on the first roll If you use Fighting Spirit before taking your first Attack action, your first attack would have advantage applied from two sources. But advantage and disadvantage don't stack. That is, you can't have "double advantage." If multiple situations affect a roll and each one grants ...


25

If Your DM Says It Does, It Does One of the advantages (haha) of Advantage is that it can be granted circumstantially, as per the rules on Advantage: The GM can also decide that circumstances influence a roll in one direction or the other and grant advantage or impose disadvantage as a result. So if the DM says that using Thaumaturgy grants Advantage ...


11

By RAW, not particularly. But in RP? yes, those are generally seen as intimidating effects, and its up to you/the DM to negotiate how that will be implemented. It could be by directly giving advantage or a positive bonus to your rolls, or maybe by lowering the DC or giving the NPC disadvatage.


-1

Only the first attack is at advantage. The description of the spell True Strike states (PHB, page 284; emphasis mine): On your next turn, you gain advantage on your first attack roll against the target, provided that this spell hasn't ended. As such, only the first attack will have advantage, and any afterwards would not. This is because attacks are ...


4

I agree with your self-answer; in your case, DC changes alone are probably better than disadvantage (and definitely better than DC changes plus disadvantage). Now for some theory... DC and skill bonus do not matter; their difference does Passing a DC 13 skill check using a +3 bonus is mechanically identical to passing a DC 25 skill check using a +15 bonus. ...


8

It would seem I have found my answer, if the math on this linked page is correct. In my example, playing the harmonica at DC13 results in a .400 possibility of success. Add the unicycle (DC10 with disadvantage) and the odds go down to .303, while doing both (DC13 with disadvantage) brings the odds down to .16 Having said that, I now think I was ...


-7

Revealing your location does not affect Hiding, only whether enemies have to guess your location. Hiding When you try to hide, make a Dexterity (Stealth) check. Until you are discovered or you stop hiding, that check's total is contested by the Wisdom (Perception) check of any creature that actively searches for signs of your presence. When you Hide you ...


2

With the new questions and mention of context, here is what I hope will be a more concise answer, but first I should elaborate on the key three rules you are looking at, as I believe there is some confusion there with how they all interact: The "Hiding" rule The DM decides when circumstances are appropriate for hiding. When you try to hide, make a ...


5

Respectively: Yes. No. Yes. Or rather; Hiding only causes you to be unseen (and gain that sweet disadvantage) whilst you do nothing to make yourself ineligible for hiding, and then stops until you make another Hide action. When you try to hide, make a Dexterity (Stealth) check. Until you are discovered or you stop hiding, that check's total is contested ...


9

"Giving away your location" just means that enemies know where you are. It doesn't necessarily mean they can see you. For example, you can be invisible but, due to drastically failing a Stealth check by sneezing, the enemy now knows there is an invisible creature standing somewhere by the bookshelf. Thus giving them something to aim at (despite not knowing ...


11

A hidden (PHB p.177) creature is “unseen and unheard” (and unsmelled, untouched and untasted: while not stated if you are actually licking someone you probably know where they are) - this is different (and better) than merely being unseen. An unseen creature that is not hidden is “known” to everyone and can be freely targeted (except by things that require ...


4

If you attack while hidden then your location becomes known immediately afterwards. This just means everyone now knows where you are, or more specifically, where you were when you made the attack. It doesn't necessarily mean you are now visible. You might have been hidden because you were lurking quietly in a dark area which no enemy could see into. Or you ...


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