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-1

Honestly, I am in the middle of DMing a game where the players consistently pick absolutely unimportant things to follow. I see it as a chance for them to dictate where the story goes. I have my main plot points laid out; how they get there is up to them. Right now, we have played 2.5 sessions following a lead that was actually a passing remark I made ...


5

I’ve seen this issue from both sides. As a GM, it’s really easy to say something ambiguous or describe something in a specific manner that the players interpret as “ooh, let’s check that out” instead of as “hmm, interesting, now let’s go”. As a player, I (which may not be the same for your players) find it fun to check out every little side thing even if ...


3

There are different ways on how to deal with this all of them valid. You will have to choose for yourself what fits right for your group and game. Depending on what your game and preparation allows, adjust the adventure to give players actions more significance. This will reward your players for their effort and I find that it generally improves the quality ...


3

This, to me, sounds like the answer would depend on what kind of DM you are. For some DMs, rolling with it and improvising something on-the-fly, whether that's coming up with a way in which the lord is related to the witch/children plot, or whether it's an entirely separate side quest, would be the best option, if you're the sort of DM with strong ...


3

There are a few options, depending on how much work you want to give yourself as a DM and your ability to come with things on the fly! The players find nothing other than what you originally planned for them to find. This is an option you already considered. There is no requirement for you to offer up additional rewards just because the players accidentally ...


7

One way to deal with this is to nest a side quest within the encounter where they have overestimated the importance. Rather than making the encounter more significant than you originally intended, keep it the same, but offer them something else—perhaps the chance to help the lord or someone else in the manor with another matter entirely—so that the encounter ...


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