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2

If you're willing to use rules from Pathfinder's antecedent Dungeons & Dragons 3.5, that game's Monster Manual on Natural Tendencies says Some creatures simply aren’t made for certain types of physical activity. Elephants, despite their great Strength scores, are terrible at jumping. Giant crocodiles, despite their high Strength scores, don’t climb ...


3

Yes, there are rules, as long as you're willing to accept Jason Bulmahn, Paizos Lead Developer, as an authority on the rules. There's actually a Paizo blog post about animals and their use of items. The blog post is mostly directed towards int scores and feat taking for the animals to utilize weapons, but tool use is also mentioned. https://paizo.com/...


-1

They should be able to understand. Polymorph says that the target can't speak. I didn't say that you couldn't understand your previous languages. Now tongues says and I quote: "any creature that knows at least one language-" so because polymorph didn't change the spy's understanding of languages, just the ability to speak, the spy/sheep still knows at least ...


0

Technically yes, but in practice, it's not worth the effort. It looks like your main concern is an opponent using handle animal to command your companion in combat to cause issues for you. Most animals aren't going to take commands from creatures they are unfriendly or hostile towards, and will also prioritize commands of their master over the commands of ...


14

You're fresh out of Medical beasts Both Wild Shape and polymorph are limited to Beast forms, which aren't typically assosciated with medical works. In fact, you can search for creatures on D&D Beyond and filter for creatures which are proficient with Medicine. That list is humanoid heavy, including only three non-humanoids; sirens, yakfolk priests, ...


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