Hot answers tagged

25

It becomes part of the character when it's more important than the other aspects that they have. Something as ephemeral as the Create Advantage action probably won't change a character in such a fundamental way, and (probably) neither will getting an item. Hmm. Example time: We've got a character with a couple of aspects: "Always stand up against bullies"...


25

Summary: Negative aspects are easy "push button here" dispensers for Fate points, but spamming that button needlessly is boring at best. Two things need to be kept in mind: drama, and the Fate point economy. Being stymied or drained of Fate points by the same problem over and over isn't dramatic or interesting, so don't do it. But the Fate points must flow! ...


25

Attacks do not usually have Aspects. Casting a Fireball (or whatever) usually just means rolling your Magic skill (or whatever you're using) and you can tag the Troll's "Vulnerable to Fire" aspect. You could also tag your own "I am good at Fire Magic" aspects to double up on it, though. It will cost 2 Fate points to do both, but in this case you can indeed ...


20

What Ryan did in that video was suggest that there was an Aspect in the game that wasn't written down but was obviously there based on what was being roleplayed. Wil and the others at the table agreed, and so Ryan compelled the aspect at the same time that he brought it up. See Creating and Discovering New Aspects In Play If you’re not looking for a free ...


19

You start at the beginning: Fate points represent those moments in the fiction when an Aspect of the story becomes prominent. If you're spending a Fate point on "My Father's Sword," it's because the fact that the sword was handed down to you is particularly relevant in this scene. As a result, spending them on the first three swings in combat might not have ...


19

Does a good Aspect say one thing? Or more than one thing? We see in much Fate material the advice that a good Aspect says more than one thing. OK: sort of. It should say one thing and then say more about that one thing. It shouldn't say many things which aren't directly related to each other. Many wordy drafts of Aspects contain information which don't ...


16

It could work. How well depends on the fiction, the player, and you. I appreciate the thing you're trying to do, and yes, Fate is pretty good at handling these kinds of Aspects. However, in cases like this, you'll want to make sure that everyone agrees what they mean. Take "Fastest Man Alive," for example. In a real-world kind of game, that might mean you ...


16

In Fate Core you invoke aspects to improve rolls or passive opposition The Fate Core rules are clear about this. Invoking an aspect is described on FC 68 and gives the following things you can do when you invoke an aspect: Reroll all your dice. Pass a +2 benefit to another character’s roll, if it’s reasonable that the aspect you’re invoking would be ...


16

You're gonna have to go to the Fate Core book for the full explanation. Although they don't mention it for this particular case, FAE makes a habit of expecting players to refer to Core for more details on a host of subjects. This is because Fate Accelerated, in order to stay svelte, doesn't talk much about corner cases. Since multiple free invokes on one ...


15

For resistance to fire: It's pretty straightforward to use stunts and extras. Because I am a dragon, I have armor:2 against heat-based attacks. or Because I am a dragon, I have +2 to defence rolls against fire. If you go this route, then stress and consequences you do take will probably represent an attack finally penetrating your resistance. This ...


14

There's a couple ways you can handle this. Mix and match as you like; each probably works fine on its own or in conjunction with others. Use existing mechanics to make stunning more significant. So your character can impose a condition on someone that significantly debilitates them? We've got a mechanic for that, it's called a "consequence." Perhaps you'd ...


13

Aspects are narrative permission, but that doesn't mean that they are mechanical permission. He can narratively make that shield—but mechanically that's Create An Advantage. If Create An Advantage is insufficient, then he needs to pay for a new Stunt that lets him use Will for physical defence.


13

As narrative truths, aspects can and influence the story being told. So whatever anyone does at the scene has to take the slimy floor into account. If someone says they are running across the room, just ask them how they are dealing with the slime. Maybe they have high traction shoes so it isn't a big deal, or maybe they want to overcome it with their high ...


12

Fate is about narration, not simulation I think the first thing you have to understand here is that Fate, unlike many other popular rpgs (for example D&D) is about narration, not simulation. So the proper question is not, "What makes most sense in real world terms when someone falls from zone 1 or zone 2?", but rather, "What makes most sense in terms of ...


12

There is no such thing as a weapon (or anything else noteworthy in a Fate game) without an aspect, so invoke away! But see the bottom of my answer for a challenge to the idea you need a numerical bonus (or an action!) at all. Aspects are explicit statements about implicit narrative truths. This means that everything which is true about your story has an ...


12

An aspect is just a mechanical reminder of a thing that's true in the story: it's always "on." This means some actions are possible or impossible, easier or harder, because of the thing the aspect describes. However, sometimes an aspect COULD make an action or event easier or extra complicated, but it doesn't have to. This is where compels and invokes come ...


11

I'm having issues with the Fate Point system. Does someone spend a Fate Point to "discover" an aspect? Yes, you can spend a Fate point to "discover" an aspect. That's called Declaring a Story Detail. That's not the only way to discover an aspect, though: you can also create an advantage, or use a stunt that creates aspects. One of the ...


11

It's the third one. Both parties roll and see their totals. Then they can invoke aspects until neither can or wants to invoke any more, with no set order to who can invoke what when. When you're following the steps in How To Do Stuff, both parties involved in the roll are moving through these steps together simultaneously. So when we reach this step: Roll ...


11

Aspects are true. Boosts aren't, really. Just to restate the full text of the stunts you're talking about, you trade a Boost for an Aspect with a free invoke on it: Heavy Hitter. When you succeed with style on a Fight attack and choose to reduce the result by one to gain a boost, you gain a full situation aspect with a free invocation instead. from Skills &...


10

Situational aspects are transient They will most likely go away at the end of the scene. Their persistence is not earned, and thus they shouldn't be created as persistent. It's a matter of phrasing more than anything: "Banged-Up Hand" would do exactly the same thing as "Broken Hand", without presuming it'll stick around. The severity of ...


10

The Fate Core book addresses it this way, on page 156. As the scene unfolds, players might suggest features of the environment that are perfect as aspects. If the GM described the scene as being poorly lit, a player should be able to invoke the Shadows to help on a Stealth roll even if she hadn’t previously established it as an aspect. If the ...


10

Yes, if your group thinks it makes sense. Mechanically, you're spending the resources for the benefit, so it's not "unbalanced" (as much as Fate does balance) in that regard. More importantly/less flippantly: aspects are tags on important established facts, and their function is largely to remind the party of the fact and that we've agreed it's important ...


10

This process is described on page 78 of the Fate Core book. There are two ways to actively remove a situational aspect, and both require a roll of the dice for an action. The most obvious action you can take is an Overcome action targeted to remove the aspect. However, you could instead roll any kind of action which, if successful, would make the aspect ...


9

Yes, it's fine for things in the fictional environment to give permission without being aspects. The door in the room gives permission to open it and pass through; the pen and paper on a table and the literacy of a character gives permission to write a letter; and a gun in hand gives permission to shoot—all of them without having to be aspects. That is part ...


8

The important thing your player must understand is that the sword does not give him an ongoing bonus because his roll isn't about if he can hit with the sword. His roll is about if he gets to tell a bit of the story about the swordfight in question. There's a free bonus (free invoke) for people who create new story elements (create advantage), and a paid (...


8

The short answer is yes. It is because of the Bronze Rule i.e. the Fate Fractal on Page 270 of the Fate Core rulebook. In Fate, you can treat anything in the game world like it’s a character. Anything can have aspects, skills, stunts, stress tracks, and consequences if you need it to. The trick is to describe the elements you are dealing with in ...


8

The problem here began long before the player ran out of Fate points, when he took an aspect to solely represent his father's sword and expected to use it on virtually every action just to represent the utility of having a sword. Fate Core, on the "Intro to Choosing Aspects" on page 36 says of choosing aspects: Aspects which don’t help you tell a good ...


8

Yes, to both When creating an advantage, you have the option to create an advantage on an existing aspect. Success give you 1 free invoke, and success with style gives you two. There is nothing in the text that says you can only do this once. As for free invocations, keep in mind that "[y]ou can…stack multiple free invocations together." Doing what you're ...


8

Think of it as an extremely sparsely documented Extra. So, here's the reference example. I'll probably be pointing back to it now and again. The campaign is a sendup of kids' TV. Pretty much everyone's playing a kid on a bike but one player decided they'd play the local superhero: Artie, the Strongest Man in the World. (Because this is a sendup of kids' TV ...


7

What Aspects Should Players Know? Fred Hicks and Lenny Balsera (the guys behind the game) on the mailing lists have generally advocated the view that aspects should be known to the Players (not necessarily the characters) unless there is a compelling reason not to (such as giving away a plot point). The characters have knowledge of any aspects that are ...


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