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6

The source of the advantage will tell you. Generally, whatever rules text is granting advantage will explicitly tell you what attacks it applies to. If it only applies to the first attack roll, it'll say that. For example, true strike says: On your next turn, you gain advantage on your first attack roll against the target So there's no doubt that the ...


-6

Your DM is confusing advantage and resistance. They're not the same, and they don't stack multiplicatively, because they don't even apply to the same things. Advantage is always done on a d20 roll such as an attack roll, saving throw, ability check, etc. If a fire-damage spell doesn't allow a save at all, then your advantage on saving throws vs. fire-damage ...


18

It's an attack by attack basis. Lots of things can give you advantage or disadvantage. Having advantage on one target with one attack, does not necessarily mean you have it on the second attack of the same target or a different target. For example, taking the help action, to help your friend in combat gives him advantage on his first attack. But fighting ...


5

Technically, the two effects can't combine… I tried really hard to find an argument in favor of the elementalist shifter archetype's supernatural ability elemental strike combining with the Scorching Weapon feat's benefit for a cumulative effect, but when the feat says, "This [damage] does not stack with other effects that add fire damage to weapons,&...


4

Help is sometimes Working Together, and sometimes not. Working Together is sometimes Help, and sometimes not. Helping with an ability check is an example of working together; but Helping with an attack isn't. As you quoted in "Working Together": Sometimes two or more characters team up to attempt a task. The character who's leading the effort [...]...


8

Help and Working Together are independent but overlapping. I'll provide my answer, then my reasoning. The Working Together rules are part of the overall rules for ability checks; the restrictions it defines are the general rules that are in place, including the rule that helping with an ability check can only be done by a character who could normally attempt ...


7

No, you can perform no more than one attack. If you become staggered during a full attack action, you can only perform a single attack. If the attack of opportunity staggers you on any subsequent attack, then the triggering attack is disrupted. A number of places in the rules make this clear as the intended outcome. The rules for full attack specify that you ...


-1

To answer your question(s) first, as with any rules in D&D 5e they all apply, and specific overrides general in a cascade, though in this case this is not required. Going through your highlights in the rules text one by one shows there is no contradiction, no "either/or", they all apply at the same time. "Alternatively" Chapter 9 is ...


27

Your rage lasts for 1 minute. It ends early if you are knocked unconscious or if your turn ends and you haven’t attacked a hostile creature since your last turn or taken damage since then. You just have to attack - that is, try to hit the enemy. Whether you succeed or not doesn't matter. If you had to damage them, it would say so, like it does for taking ...


13

You are not attacking, the object is. Animate Objects specifically states: Each target animates and becomes a creature under your control... [...] If you command an object to attack, it can make a single melee attack against a creature within 5 feet of it. It makes a slam attack [...] You may be commanding the animated object to attack but it is its own ...


-2

I think instead of looking to the monster attributes you should try to figure out what makes sense for each creature (with confirmation from your DM). The attribute bonuses can help of course but they don't need to be the end of it. As Thomas Markov's answer points out, sometimes the monster's damage bonuses doesn't line up with their attributes: There is ...


12

Melee attacks use strength by default, but sometimes smaller monsters use dexterity. The rules for attack rolls state: Ability Modifier. The ability modifier used for a melee weapon attack is Strength, and the ability modifier used for a ranged weapon attack is Dexterity. Weapons that have the finesse or thrown property break this rule. But, we see in the ...


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