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3

It's definitely on the strong end It's hard to assess because obviously, you can not know all the cheesy or min-maxed build out there. But as a point of comparison, let's look as an actual group I know of (i.e. mine). At level 5 to 7, a +16 to touch attack is almost guaranteed to hit. We will just flatly ignore the chance of hitting for this purpose, and ...


2

As written, you get a skeletal war pony if you are Small, and a skeletal heavy warhorse otherwise (including if you are smaller than Small). The feature grants you access to a “skeletal steed,” and then defines it as precisely those two things and nothing else. This is, yes, pretty useless; the paladin special mount is a pretty good feature, and the skeletal ...


6

The bonus action shove creates some powerful combinations A concern in terms of "balance" is that the Cleric now no longer needs to make a choice in terms of boosting strength or not, since they will already tend to boost the spell casting ability. This is an 'inside the party' balance concern in terms of opportunity cost. "Spellcasting Modifier" is ...


8

That would be a pretty big buff to the caster. While most players wouldn't complain, especially those in melee getting advantage on attacks, some might not like it since casters are already pretty powerful. If you allow this, then you are now giving the caster a ranged shove as a bonus action that doesn't require Strength. So now the caster doesn't have ...


12

"Spellcasting Modifier" is an informal term that means either "spellcasting ability modifier" alone, or "your spellcasting ability modifier + your proficiency bonus + any special modifiers". Consult your DM. Typically casters have a higher Spellcasting Modifier than they have Strength (Athletics) modifier. This means that allowing players to use their ...


5

RAW: Most likely not, however it would be up to the DM. The Forge Domain cleric's Artisan's Blessing Channel Divinity says (XGtE pg. 19; emphasis mine): You conduct an hour-long ritual that crafts a nonmagical item that must include some metal: a simple or martial weapon, a suit of armor, ten pieces of ammunition, a set of tools, or another metal object (...


1

I see three courses of action, the first of which addresses the core issue that caused your question, the second and third directly answer your question. 1. Educate the DM. The easiest way to fix the issue, and my preferred way, is to have your DM properly use passive perception. If your DM learns how passive perception works, you no longer have to modify ...


15

The default D&D combat flow is not intended to do what you are trying to do; it works really well when pitting two roughly equal groups of three-to-six hostiles against each other, but too many or too few on either side lead to drawn out or static encounters respectively. In encounters I've run where a PC is scouting alone, I've found that it really runs ...


5

Preparation is key. The player's job is to assume mastery over their abilities and understand how to mitigate the dangers of an encounter. Single combatants have the sole responsibility of this since they have no other party members to rectify mistakes, and a random critical hit could mark their end. Different classes each have their own unique ways to ...


12

Wizards go 'boom' (or 'woosh') Certain classes are really good at ending an encounter in a single move, especially at lower levels. The most obvious problem is the Fireball spell, which will end almost any encounter with Goblins and the like before it has truly even started, blowing every enemy to kingdom come. Normally, this isn't that big a deal, because ...


8

It doesn't actually "break" anything Although it definitely affect the game in a few ways, which you or your players might find interesting or unsatisfactory, depends on your preferences. 5e doesn't have the one "correct" way of playing, it gives you options instead. The Dungeon Master's Guide has even less constrictive initiative variant, so the game is ...


11

Comparing just the 2nd level abilities to each other, without reference to the other wizard subclass abilities at other levels or even to class features like Spellcasting or Arcane Recovery which might synergize better with some than others is... going to be difficult to make meaningful sense of. Part of the problem is that D&D has a history of some ...


4

Balance isn't really of concern when all the power does is give information. I have never had total cover block the power, or seen it block the power and that is a good thing. If knowing what is around can break a quest or campaign then something went wrong long ago, but knowing something is under the old church can lead to new adventure. A Paladin will ...


17

If you have doubts about balance, keep in mind that ultimately that depends on how you as a DM build the campaign and possible encounters where this ability could be used. If you allow your player to by-pass total cover and then you consider that some parts of the adventure would be "ruined" by that, you're free to change it a bit to avoid that problem. If ...


4

Balance can easily be a thing of opinion, so at the end of the day it's up for you as a Dungeon Master to assess the situation and decide, "does this give the player an advantage they shouldn't already have?". Personally, yes, it can have a metaknowledge-esque effect as the player will know information that a Paladin would not normally know. They would be ...


2

You have two questions here, and they are distinct. Is It Enjoyable? It's a very dark subclass, even for warlocks. It's also pretty fundamentally evil. If this were a game I was running, I'd want to make sure that the other players (and I) were willing to deal with the direction this subclass would drag things. If you have an entire party full of people ...


16

This shield is very powerful By the first benefit alone, the shield is comparable a Shield +2. Having half-cover grants +2 AC and DEX saving throws. The reason this is not strictly better than a +2 Shield is because it does not stack with other sources of cover (and can be nullified by features that ignore cover). A +2 Shield is a rare magic item which ...


2

DnD 5e made a major shift away from 3.5e with a focus on cutting down on the ridiculous to-hit and AC values which could be achieved even at low levels. This shield by itself allows the paladin to reach an insanely high AC for his level at a very low cost(half-movement). 18 AC from plate armor (he might not have this) +1 from the Defense fighting style +2 ...


7

I would NOT be proficient with a normal shield. This is a red herring. You would not be able to use them anyway. What you are asking is a free shield proficiency, which is not really reasonable (+2 AC does not grow on trees). Your best bet is Moderately Armored feat, which you are able to get with your first ASI at level 4 (assuming single class) or as a ...


13

Using a shield without penalty will require proficiency whether it’s a ready made shield or custom made shield. For your character to gain proficiency at level 1, I recommend choosing the Hexblade warlock patron. Hexblade At 1st level, you acquire the training necessary to effectively arm yourself for battle. You gain proficiency with medium armor, ...


5

Yes, it would be acceptable. Tool proficiencies are not used often (unless it is in Thieves Tools) and their influence on the game is minimal. So, switching musical instrument proficiency for artisan's tools proficiency should not imbalance the game. Rules for background customization (PHB 125) states: "choose a total of two tool proficiencies or languages ...


5

Generally, you would need a free hand for your focus anyway. The effect of an arcane focus is that you may use it in place of most material components, but to supply them for a spell requires a free hand to manipulate them anyway. You would just be going from needing a hand for the components to needing a hand for the focus, be it wand, pendant, or even ...


9

The Esper Genesis Basic Rules state: Starship defenses include fortified frames, polarized plating, and energy shields, all of which make them fairly resistant to attacks from handheld weapons. If it becomes necessary to calculate a ship's durability in creature terms, multiply the hull points by 10, and add resistance to slashing, piercing, and ...


8

Yes. It is a game-breaking house rule. Stacking traits are always problematic. The design of 5e allows for stacking traits only sparingly, unless we suffer the same kind of Cleric of Doom problem we had in 3.5e. Some scholars of the game meta say that every encounter is designed to drain X resources from the party. Spell slots, HP, equipment, potions, long-...


3

In 1e, we had such immunity, but nearly only to elements such as fire, water, electricity... Not to all types of resistance. Also, races in 1e did not have any kind of resistance in comparison to the Tieflings or Dragonborn in 5e. Well... Elves were resistant to "charm" type of spells. But most resistance powers were more bonuses to saving throws which was ...


48

It allows for some explosive combat options and methods to gain extreme immunities For example, a Tiefling gains resistance to fire damage, they could walk into a group of enemies and cast fireball on the ground and then use absorb elements to gain immunity to the damage of the spell and also all fire damage until the start of their next turn. There are ...


2

Yes, but not between PCs. The biggest change is not in the balance between PCs, but between PCs and the rest of the world. If every player character has a cantrip, then every player character is now a spellcaster. Why is this a problem? Well, some magic items (such as the Wand of Fireballs and Wand of Lightning Bolts) require attunement by a spellcaster. ...


13

This change is unbalancing as it makes the Dueling Fighting Style often strictly better than the Great Weapon Fighting Style Let's look at the Dueling Fighting Style (D-FS), it states: When you are wielding a melee weapon in one hand and no other weapons, you gain a +2 bonus to damage rolls with that weapon. This is quite clearly meant to benefit those ...


3

I think there's two main reasons it exists. From a mechanical perspective, as a safety valve. If you look at purely tactical non-rpg games like M:TG, you'll have a selection of spells you can cast that are somewhat balanced against each other. Some are overpriced, but deal with basically any single threat. They're not often used, but sometimes they're the ...


13

Attacking the camp is never the only option There are a lot of factors that go into determining the balance of encounters in D&D. The CR guidelines, players skill, party composition and often the DM gut instinct all play a role. Without being in your DMs head or even at your table we can't tell you if they are stacking things against you. However we can ...


10

"Mathematically", this is beyond a "deadly" encounter, but that doesn't mean the DM planned on killing you. Using the tables in the DMG (page 82): A "hard" encounter for 4 level 8 characters would have monsters worth 5600 XP, a "deadly" encounter 8400 XP. 20 "minions" = 2000 (at 1/2 which would be very beefy for their CR seeing as other 1/2 CR has around ...


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