112

Well, I don't think I need to tell you that it's within RAW, per the spell description of Fireball [emphasis mine]: A bright streak flashes from your pointing finger to a point you choose within range then blossoms with a low roar into an explosion of flame. Each creature in a 20-foot radius must make a Dexterity saving throw. A target takes 8d6 fire ...


87

Boy, so many people lining up to tell you "don't do it that way it's badwrongfun!" I'll offer a differing perspective, which is yes, absolutely, use a house rule to this effect. It has the desired effect of adding verisimilitude without "nerfing" or "ruining" anything. I shall offer up real play experience and not pure opinion ...


74

This meta-game accuracy is a purposeful feature of using the optional grid rules — that kind of tactical detail is the whole point of using a grid. An obvious alternative that eliminates miniatures-based player precision is to not use the optional grid rules. There's some discussion of imprecise AoE handling on DMG page 249 (in short “make a call, consult ...


67

You do not need to use miniatures and a battle grid. In fact, playing on a grid at all is listed as a variant game option - it is not the default rules assumption.


63

How do the Kobolds remember which parts are trapped? Basically, this answer is about weaving the Kobold's own marking system into the narrative. It does assume you draw your own maps and don't use Dungeon Tiles or anything. Obtain 6 or so pretty looking symbols (they don't need to have meaning, but if they look Draconic it's bonus awesome) Mark every square ...


57

I'm going to give the solution I came up with following some experimenting with my player following the game. It isn't perfect and somewhat mitigates the challenge of darkness but seems to be the best compromise to increase player enjoyment. Give all players a 3ft Light Source Under token settings set each player's token to emit a 3ft light source that ...


45

Don't change the number, change the units Instead of it being 5ft squares, call them 5 inch squares, continue with the rest of the game as normal safe in the knowledge that everything is exactly the same and there are no balance concerns not inherent in the system. Or if inches aren't quite right invent some fantasy measurement which is around a fifth of a ...


43

You as the GM should move their token based on how they describe what they are doing. It is pitch black, all they can feel is the hand they are holding and have to follow it blindly. Let the player with the Darkvision move as normal and you as the GM move all the other PC tokens along with him. The sense of not having control and relying on someone else ...


40

For remote play at our table, we use a camera that is stuck on a microphone-boom-arm that can be rotated by 360°. We found out that we prefer it to have our rest position at about 45°, instead of top-down because the top-down angle creates nausea for some of our players, and it simulates sitting at a table. We use a 19 by 19 go-board with numbered and ...


38

D&D 3rd edition (2000-2003) The five-foot square was not standardized on until D&D 3rd edition, which made it a standard part of the rules in the original core rulebooks published in the year 2000. However, 10ft and hybrid 10ft/5ft squares still appeared in some dungeon maps until the D&D v3.5 revision (2003), which encouraged the designed ...


32

Here are some examples of the areas affected by a 15-foot cone cast at different angles. The point of origin is shown at an intersection between squares (as recommended in the DMG), and also centered on the side of the square for attacks in a cardinal direction (which is more intuitive). Here are all the squares that are touched by the cone: Here are all ...


31

In the old days, in the 1980s and 1990s, scenarios never came with a map at an appropriate scale for use with miniatures. The GM's map would be complete, with secrets, at a much smaller scale, in the region of 0.25" on paper to 10' of character scale. For playing with miniatures it would be used like this: The players would set up a generic marching order, ...


31

Let's get one thing out of the way first: Playing on a grid is a variant to the normal rules. These variant rules can be found in the green insert/sidebar on page 192 of the Player's Handbook. To calculate range using these rules you count squares as though you were moving: To determine the range on a grid between two things—whether creatures or objects—...


30

No, you do not need to use miniatures Miniatures and grids are not necessary for playing D&D 5e, they can be useful visual aids for combat as you can see exactly where you are relative to other characters but, outside of combat, there is little need to use them. Here is what the Dungeon Master’s Guide page 250 says: In combat, players can often rely on ...


29

Each 5' square actually takes up 25 square feet (5' x 5'). So you could divide up the 241/25 to get roughly 10 squares, or you could figure out the original length and width and divide each of those by 5' (and round up I guess).


29

It originates from a corner DMG 251: Choose an intersection of squares or hexes as the point of origin of an area of effect, then follow its rules as normal. If an area of effect is circular and covers at least half a square, it affects that square. As with most area spells, you don't target an enemy with it, just a patch of ground. So it covers 2x2 ...


27

In the earliest rules, Chainmail with its Fantasy Supplement (Gygax & Perren, 1971), the fireball referenced the catapult rules for its mechanic. That includes the following optional rule (2E, p. 10): Fire Optional: Roll two different colored dice. One color is for an over-shoot and the other is for an under-shoot. To decide which number ...


26

Draw up a number of city map sections as geomorphic map tiles. Lay out a few tiles as a starting area and then, when the PCs get close to the edge of that area, grab another tile and use it to extend the map in the appropriate direction. If necessary, tiles can also be reclaimed from areas which have been left behind and reused. In the event of an ...


25

Miniatures come in varying sizes and they are all described in metric units. For D&D and most other RPGs the most commonly used scale is 25/28mm - this is a scale of 1:64/1:56-58. Mats are usually drawn with 1" or 25mm grids which are almost the same (1"=25.4mm). For D&D a square represents 5 feet, a scale of 1:60. These scales are clearly not the ...


25

Cloud of daggers fills one 5-foot square. Neither of the options that you show are correct. The spell description states that it takes up: a cube 5 feet on each side Since one square is five feet by five feet, you can fill one square with the cloud. If you target the center of a grid cell, then the spell fills that entire grid cell. Note that the spell ...


25

Choose an intersection as the point of origin. The rules for areas of effect on a grid require that you choose an intersection of squares or hexes as the point of origin. From the Dungeon Master’s Guide (pp. 250-251), in the rules for using miniatures, it says the following about areas of effect: Choose an intersection of squares or hexes as the point of ...


24

Strictly RAW, using the optional flanking rules from the DMG, this would not qualify for flanking. The flanking rules read: When a creature and at least one of its allies are adjacent to an enemy and on opposite sides or corners of the enemy’s space, they flank that enemy [...] When in doubt about whether two creatures flank an enemy on a grid, trace an ...


23

Distance in squares and other actions: Did a spellcaster ever miscast a spell as he suddenly realized that the target was out of range? Did a fighter ever charge and notice that he could not reach the opponent, wasting his action? Did an archer ever shoot an arrow to notice that it could not reach the target? If you answered three times with no I think you ...


23

The DMG rules are consistent if you count the exact number of spaces, while measuring either way around. In other words, if you have two creatures adjacent to a middle creature, then count both clockwise and counterclockwise. If the number of spaces (in either direction) equals the number you're trying to count, then there are that many spaces in between. ...


22

I am unable to find a specific answer to your question by RAW (maybe somebody else can help), but having a look at a relevant rule may help: PHB 198: If the mount provokes an opportunity attack while you're on it, the attacker can target you or the mount. The way I read that is that if your mount's movement of space (its occupied area) provokes an ...


22

It's a crooked building. The City of Splendors box set depicts the towers, as illustro pointed out in a comment: Following Ryan Thompson's idea, I searched for the Kolat Towers' lore. According to the Forgotten Realms wiki entry: The building known as Kolat Towers started out as an old stone manor and a pair of sturdy cottages. Before 1368 DR, the ...


21

Space Controlled The size is not about physical boundaries the creature occupies, but to area the creature effectively controls. The Size Categories table shows how much space a creature of a particular size controls in combat. Which means, you and the horse are somewhere inside that area. And have control over it. Moreover, it also means that unlike ...


21

Reach is measured from the rider RAW Nothing in the rules says that mounting another creature changes your size. So, according to the most basic reading of the rules, your size simply does not change. There are no secret rules and this is both the simplest and most RAW answer. So that would make the answer to your second question a definitive "no". ...


21

No, as long as the battle mat is on a different scale from the larger map, and it's not permanent You can reconcile a battle mat with a player-mapped dungeon by focusing the battle map only on the immediate area, such as a single room or hallway (adding more if necessary). After the battle, erase the drawing on the battle map. This strategy lets you give ...


21

There are 4 different rules in 2 books XGtE contain two options, Tokens and Templates, while DMG has a rule that would make a lot of sense, but it is limited to circular effects. Yes, using the Template Method from XGtE Create a template for Lightning Bolt, 1 inch wide, 20 long. Then apply it to the grid as per XGtE (p.86): you can lay it on the ...


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