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22

The language is specific but understated: When a move has you roll+BOND you'll count the number of bonds you have with the character in question and add that to the roll. It doesn't count the number of bonds you have "with each other" or "that the characters share", it's specifically the number of bonds you have with that character, unidirectional. Like ...


14

Bonds are normally public. Step 12 of Character Creation (Dungeon World, p. 54) makes that clear. The previous step required everyone to introduce and describe their characters; this one says: Take some time to discuss the bonds and let the GM ask questions about them as they come up. You’ll want to go back and forth and make sure everyone is happy ...


13

Per the main bond rules, bonds are strictly between player characters. Bonds are what make you a party of adventurers, not just a random assortment of people. They’re the feelings, thoughts, and shared history that tie you together. You will always have at least one bond, and you’ll often have more. Each bond is a simple statement that relates your ...


9

I have only played without Bonds once. The group was made up of some of my 'core' (meaning people I play with regularly, who love character interaction and are active, make sure to share the spotlight but still interested and always engaged) and some random people from LFG. It was also a short thing, only three sessions... so take all of this with that in ...


7

This definitely falls into houserule territory, not RAW. However, bonds have two mechanical effects: Take +1 ongoing to aid or interfere with the target of the bond. Mark experience once when the bond is resolved. I can't think of a way for the former to come up, but if it did, it would probably be awesome. The latter is equivalent to rolling a miss ...


7

This will be fine, but may be unnecessary Check the rules There are a few rules you should be sure you're following before suggesting this rules change. A player may have more than one bond with the same other PC. (Page 52, Choose Bonds) If you forgot or didn't realize, that's fine! You can write more bonds at any time (up to the number of slots on your ...


7

Is the fact that one PC is interacting largely with NPCs really "starving them of XP"? The End of Session move indicates that you resolve at most 1 bond per session. Even if you remove this limit as a house rule, it seems likely that bonds would be a minor source of XP at most. This seems to be a case where you're using the game to do something it wasn't ...


4

Bonds are one of the mechanics of Dungeon World that varies significantly in importance between groups. I've run games where they were vital, and games where they were mostly ignored. This variability is by design.[1] Bonds exist not only because they interact with the Help/Interfere move, but also because they're creativity prompts. If a group jumps on ...


4

There are two main areas this change would impact: XP gains, and roleplay. XP The bonds system gives, at most, 1 XP to a character per session. In practice, this is probably less, as there are likely to be sessions where a character doesn't change their bond with anyone. With flags, it seems fairly likely that you can do it most sessions. If you don't ...


4

Bonds are what make you a party of adventurers, not just a random assortment of people. They're the feelings, thoughts, and shared history that tie you together. That is, bonds are the relationships between PCs. So your question really becomes: How does a group make its internal relationships relevant during sessions where certain players are absent? Let me ...


3

Rather than tying it to the bond, I might suggest the player to put that in place of their alignment statement- those have the intent of directing the character's role play interactions with the world in general rather than the strong interpersonal bent of the standard bonds. That would allow it to have a similar effect in terms of experience gain and once ...


3

Adding a new character should be done just like the initial character creation. Ask the players how they know the new character. They'll build the bond from there. Perhaps the new character is an old friend or enemy, or a relative, or an acquaintance they made while they were imprisoned in the Imperial dungeon a few years before the game started. Maybe the ...


3

Your character gets addressed, but you're still a player. It feels like you've narrated yourself into a corner here. You've got a DM who is routinely resetting you to the way you were at character creation, but is not resetting bonds, and you're deciding on your own that you should reset yours. You, the player, still remember everything that's happened. ...


2

The only thing I'd be careful of is writing more than half your bonds at a time with one character. Bonds are meant to tie you to the whole party, not just one person. (Also aid rolls get way too easy/hard, depending who you're pointing at.) To cover the occasional absence, feel free to temporarily table any bonds you have with absent people - when those ...


2

Don't create bonds at character creation I know the book tells you to do it when you first roll characters, but it feels forced and players are almost always going to use one of the 4 suggested ones and shoe-horn one of the other PCs into it. This leads to a very artificial backstory that's not really fleshed out and the onus is on the PCs now to try to ...


2

I would argue that you roll for the bonds you have with them, not the ones they have with you. First, all of the other +<something> rolls in the game can be read directly from your character sheet. Why would this be special enough to include something from someone else's? Second, the bond rules allow you to bond with whomever you wish. Games I've ...


1

Bonds between characters keep the party together in various ways. Thus it's reasonable to assume that a bond to a location would keep the character with the bond tied closer to that location, thus pulling them away from the party and keeping them tied closer to that location. This would be a great bond for a retiring character: feeling less attached to the ...


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