New answers tagged

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This tweet by rules designer Jeremy Crawford is as definitive as an answer could get: Question: can a monk use more than one aspect of the Open hand technique in a turn? Could I knock one opponent back 15ft and knock one prone in the same turn if both attacks hit? Answer: Open Hand Technique can be used whenever you hit with a Flurry of Blows ...


2

There is no definitive answer As written there is nothing to say whether or not land vehicles should be included (or excluded) in the effect of Elk totem option for the 6th-level Aspect of the Beast from the Barbarians Path of the Totem Warrior. (SCAG p. 122) Elk. Whether mounted or on foot, your travel pace is doubled, as is the travel pace of up to ...


4

Yes In a way, a magical feature that allows you to place pictures and text onto a surface is not that different to anyone else just doing the same manually with ink and paint. Since anyone can attempt to use ink and paint to forge a document, there's no reason why the artificer ability couldn't do the same. The mundane case would likely call for a ...


0

The Elk option does not affect vehicles. Elk. Whether mounted or on foot, your travel pace is doubled, as is the travel pace of up to 10 companions while they’re within 60 feet of you and you’re not incapacitated (see chapter 8 in the Player’s Handbook for more information about travel pace). The elk spirit helps you roam far and fast. If you are riding ...


6

Yes, if you want The rule for the Steel Defender states: You determine the creature's appearance and whether it has two legs or four; your choice has no effect on its game statistics. The wording is sufficiently vague that you could say "My steel defender has reconfigurable limbs, allowing me to change it between 2 legs and 4." The rules do not say ...


1

NO, you cannot change the form after the fact but, you can choose any design for your steel defender. After you have one in existence, you can just create a whole new one after a long rest. ERLW PG. 61 You determine the creature's appearance and whether it has two legs or four; your choice has no effect on its game statistics. At the end of a ...


5

It's unclear if you can change the appearance of an existing Steel Defender. But you can absolutely build another Steel Defender with a different appearance. And building another Steel Defender simply requires a bit of down time.


3

As a general rule you should avoid having every feature of a subclass being combat oriented. The Assassin is built around getting close to someone and attacking them before they know there is a risk of combat. Its 3rd level feature gives it nice damage from doing so. Its 9th and 13th level abilities make it easier to do this. And its 17th level ability ...


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Unfortunately, paladins cannot ritual cast There are four classes that can ritual cast, as default: Bard, Cleric, Druid & Wizard. Each of these classes, under the heading ‘Spellcasting’ has the following text: Ritual Casting You can cast any bard spell you know as a ritual if that spell has the ritual tag. Paladins do not have this section in ...


20

RAW, paladins cannot cast ritual spells as ritual In the Spellcasting chapter in the PHB, under Rituals: To cast a spell as a ritual, a spellcaster must have a feature that grants the ability to do so. The cleric and the druid, for example, have such a feature. The caster must also have the spell prepared or on his or her list of spells known, unless the ...


5

It's probably balanced In the grand scheme of things, having a (much) better chance to crit one enemy isn't all that over powered. Sure at level 20 you get 20d6+2*weapon damage, but really a Wizard doubles that with one cast of Meteor Swarm anyway. It also adds a little more of a team player aspect for 1 round. The Real Changes The problem I see with this ...


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It would only be unbalanced if left written as is. The theme behind Assassin Rogues feels centered around solo abilities and surprising your opponent. Let's look at their sub-class features: Starting at 3rd level, you are at your deadliest when you get the drop on your enemies....any hit you score against a creature that is surprised is a critical hit. ...


7

A character can be affected by more than one Wild Magic Surge See the first result on the chart: 01-02. Roll on this table at the start of each of your turns for the next minute, ignoring this result on subsequent rolls. If a character could not be subject to more than one Wild Magic Surge at a time, there would be no need to list a duration for this ...


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It's only a bit unbalanced As @NathanS comments, Assassin has weak Level 9 (Infiltration) and Level 13 (Imposter) features. You may not ever have a chance to use them. This is balanced by the powerful Levels 3 (Assassinate) and situational Level 17 (Death Strike) features. Compare to the L3 Thief features (Fast Hands and Second Story Work), which give no ...


13

I think this change would be fine A common complaint about the Assassin roguish archetype is that its level 9 and 13 features are quite lackluster. They only make sense in specific scenarios, which may not come up in your campaign, making them completely useless. I agree with your player that Supreme Sneak does suit the Assassin from a flavour perspective, ...


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No It actually wouldn’t make much of a difference at all. By level 9 either getting advantage/huge bonuses on sneak attempts or disguising yourself as another person aren’t terribly hard to pull off if you have spellcaster friends or access to magic items (Invisibility and Pass Without Trace just to name a few, let alone that your sneaky assassin probably ...


2

You must succeed on the DC to cast the spell as mentioned previously. Magic Savant relates to the ability to use magic items (or in this case scrolls) that would not usually apply to your race/class. For example, You're a Warforged Artificier Battle Smith and randomly stumble upon a Dwarven Thrower. [Weapon (warhammer), very rare (requires attunement by ...


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The monk can negate the disadvantage after it is applied. The rules for making an attack are given in the Player's Handbook on page 193: Whether you're striking with a melee weapon, firing a weapon at range, or making an attack roll as part of a spell, an attack has a simple structure. Choose a target. Pick a target within your attack's range: a ...


1

If they actually happen simultaneously, it is up to whoever's turn it is. As you pointed out, it might not necessarily be the monk's turn. Generally this interaction would probably be happening on either the monk or warlock's turn, so I imagine it would generally resolve to that player's favor. You also linked the answer about whether reactions interrupt ...


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As they each activate at the same time, one can not be used because another was used Since they each must activate as the attack roll is being made, which is a specific time that they can be activated, they all have the exact same time that they must be activated. One can not be activated and then the other, they would have to be activated simultaneously ...


0

First of all, as pointed out by others: Mike Mearl's interpretation of the rules is extremely liberal. The rules for passive checks follows the following rule: A passive check... can represent the average result for a task done repeatedly, such as searching for secret doors over and over again, or can be used when the DM wants to secretly determine ...


4

You can use Entropic Ward so long as a creature is making an attack roll and you can take reactions; there are no other requirements. The feature never says that you have to be able to see whoever is attacking you, nor do you have to know where they are, or anything of the sort. The only thing required is that a creature be making an attack roll against you,...


5

The first sentence of Evasion is almost certainly "flavor text" with no mechanical effect There are a number of monsters listed with an Evasion trait whose text is nearly identical to the second sentence of the rogue's and monk's Evasion traits. For example, the assassin and the master thief, both evidently based loosely on rogues of 12th and 13th level ...


3

The interpretation by Mike Mearls is on the liberal side of RAW From the Player's Handbook page 175 (emphasis added): Passive Checks A passive check is a special kind of ability check that doesn't involve any die rolls. Such a check can represent the average result for a task done repeatedly, such as searching for secret doors over and over again, ...


7

Mike Mearls is simply wrong. Read the book, play the game, learn from your experiences, ignore the tweets. He's wrong when he says that an ability check requires an action. It's unclear whether he means an action in terms of the turn structure, or an action in the informal sense of putting forth effort to do something, but either way there are obvious ...


12

Passive checks are different from active ones A passive check is a special kind of ability check that doesn’t involve any die rolls. Such a check can represent the average result for a task done repeatedly, such as searching for secret doors over and over again, or can be used when the DM wants to secretly determine whether the characters succeed at ...


24

Yes Despite the first sentence in the paragraph mentioning "certain area effects", I believe the second part is more important: When you are subjected to an effect that allows you to make a Dexterity saving throw to take only half damage, you instead take no damage if you succeed on the saving throw, and only half damage if you fail. This does ...


5

Evasion requires both area-of-effect and Dexterity-save-for-half D&D rules are meant to be parsed as plain English - one can write about a "green car" in one sentence, then continue talking about that car in subsequent sentences without the need to repeatedly specify that the car is green. The word "effects" in one sentence is implicitly referring to ...


7

Same-Character Synergies Shield Master does three things, but they don't really have good synergy with the Rogue's class abilities. The shove ability seems like it would have some synergy with Sneak Attack, by making the target prone (which grants advantage to melee attacks), but unfortunately the Sage Advice Compendium requires you to complete the Attack ...


19

Yes Only spells and effects that require concentration will cause you to stop your current spell concentration. This'll be mostly concentration spells, or magical items and class effects that have a phrasing along the lines 'as if you were concentrating on a spell'. As a bonus action, you cast command, without expending a spell slot, and you take on an ...


3

Sisyphean Food You can make it, but you won't be nourished Performance of Creation from the UA College of Creation states: As an action, you can create one nonmagical item of your choice in an unoccupied space within 10 feet of you... The created item disappears at the end of your next turn, unless you use your action to maintain it. Each time you ...


0

I'm going to agree with Steve's answer, and say yes. According to the Sage Advice Compendium (page 18): Determining whether a game feature is magical is straightforward. Ask yourself these questions about the feature: Is it a magic item? Is it a spell? Or does it let you create the effects of a spell that’s mentioned in its description? Is ...


0

The chosen creatures automatically succeed on their saving throws against the spell, and they take no damage if they would normally take half damage on a successful save. They do not just take no damage it depends on what making a SAVE on the spell does. It could be half damage, no damage, etc. They simply automatically make their saving th


21

Yes, but why? A weapon in 5e is defined in the basic rules under the monsters section as A manufactured item or a natural weapon such as a claw or tail spike used to make attacks. The Weapon Bond ritual has the following requirements: Requires 1 hour Target must be a weapon A weapon that is a part of your body is still a weapon The weapon must be ...


1

No, but for different reasons than stated in other answers. I agree with Marq's answer, but there's another angle that he's missing, and that's bonding with part of an object. Natural weapons are part of a larger whole. If you were to break off a horn or claw and bond with that, then yes, I don't see why that wouldn't work. (If you break it off your own ...


13

Not the way you're thinking. If you're a minotaur, you don't need to bond with your horns. They're already permanently bound to you. You can't be disarmed of them except by major trauma, which would render them useless as weapons anyway (what are you going to do, glue them back on?). If you're using Alter Self or something to grow temporary natural claws, ...


20

No. First, as with everything, pushing the limits of wording or definitions in the rules to gain some kind of advantage is subject to the approval of your DM. It's a fundamental part of D&D as a game that the rules are incomplete and in some places ambiguous or unspecified, and the DM's job includes navigating those ambiguities when they arise in order ...


8

Yes, but no A natural weapon is a weapon. So in theory anything that "targets" a weapon can target a natural weapon unless it says otherwise. The problem is that Alter Self only lasts for 1 hour. And the bonding ritual requires an hour. Even if you had a way to extend the duration of Alter Self or the DM allowed the ritual to complete a split second ...


11

The goblin is freed. Here's the relevant rules for the net: A Large or smaller creature hit by a net is restrained until it is freed. A creature can use its action to make a DC 10 Strength check, freeing itself or another creature within its reach on a success. Dealing 5 slashing damage to the net (AC 10) also frees the creature without harming it, ...


24

The following items from the DMG are included and useful: Dwarven Thrower Holy Avengers Instruments of the Bards Moonblades, but only if you are neutral good Prayer Beads Robe of the Archmagi (but only if its alignment matches) (15+Dex AC and bonuses against spells) Rod of Resurrection 11 different kinds of staves Tome of the Stilled Tongue (bonus action ...


0

The way it is printed, it's HP are calculated by (lvl×5) + 2(CON bonus) + (players INT bonus). As to whether the Steel Defender should have more HP then the Artificer, it's a guardian - it darn well should have more HP than what it's protecting. The fact that it might not seems off. The formula looks off because it gets its CON bonus to HP only once, ...


2

No; Eldritch Cannon doesn't get rid of the spell slot cost The Artillerist artificer gets the Eldritch Cannon feature at 3rd level when they choose the subclass, which lets them create an eldritch cannon. The feature says, in part (Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 59; emphasis mine): At 3rd level, you learn how to create a magical cannon. Using ...


18

(Xanathar's Guide to Everything, page 28) Under Arcane shot, when first describing the feature it says: Once per turn when you fire an arrow from a shortbow or longbow as part of the Attack action, you can apply one of your Arcane Shot options to that arrow. You decide to use the option when the arrow hits a creature, unless the option doesn’t involve ...


19

The racial cantrip that some races get (including Dancing Lights for Drow) is in addition to any cantrips that might be gained as a class feature. The character adds that racial cantrip to the list of cantrips known - it does NOT take one of the known cantrips allowed if cantrips are gained as a class feature.


27

The only affected undead are those who fail their save. Roll a d20 save for each undead {in your question} The zombies in the area that fail the save are instantly destroyed. The zombies that passed are now turned and will move as far away as possible during their turn. Not quite. Channel Divinity: Turn Undead Each undead that can see or ...


8

Neither The Destroy Undead feature replaces what happens when a creature fails the saving throw. It does not say anything about applying an effect to creatures that pass the save. So the potential outcomes are: CR 1/2 or lower and failed the save: These creatures are destroyed. CR 1 or higher and failed the save: These creatures are turned and will ...


18

Adding vulnerability doesn't remove immunity There's nothing in the rules about any of vulnerability, resistance, or immunity being mutually exclusive. In fact, in the case of vulnerability and resistance, the rules explicitly cover the case of a creature having both (emphasis added): Resistance and then vulnerability are applied after all other ...


3

No, it doesn't The definition of 'vulnerability': If a creature or object has vulnerability to a damage type, damage of that type is doubled against it. If a creature is immune to a damage type, then damage of that type is reduced to 0. This is from a plain English reading of the meaning of "immunity" - to be unaffected by something. There is nothing ...


-6

The Specific Effect of the Feature Beats the General Immunity This is a case of specific beats general via a class feature effect. For instance, an adventurer can’t normally pass through walls, but some spells make that possible. In this instance, a creature can't normally be damaged by fire, but the class feature makes that possible for a very ...


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