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12

Noble is a background, not a class It is a background and you can find the mechanics of choosing to be a Noble under Backgrounds in Chapter 4 of the PHB (Personality and Background.) It is also not listed as option in Chapter 3: Classes. Your example In your example, you would be a Tiefling Druid with the Noble background. You pick your race, your class,...


50

The word "class" is being used in two different senses here. Noble, as a social class stratum in a Feudal/Medieval setting, is a different use of the term than "Class" for a PC such as Druid, Fighter, Ranger, Wizard, etc, that has a progression from level 1 - 20 with game mechanical benefits. Answer: Noble is a background for D&D 5e, not a PC class. ...


1

I would honestly suggest some sort of compromise if you're worried about it completely breaking things. If you want to make the RP more immersive, have the player in question respec a level or two at a time with their character finding an in-game means of retraining their skills. Basically, make them work for it and make it an enhancement to roleplaying. ...


-1

As other answers have said, there is no balance problem - but you are right that your other players may want the same thing... So just be open and upfront with them. Ask them if they think it's OK, and offer them the same deal (maybe with some restrictions applying that you work together with them, so it still fits with everything you have planned.) I know ...


0

I think allowing a multiclassed character to rebuild to a single-classed version of the same character is fine, as long as the concept is still believable, or the character's transition from one class or subclass to another is believable. I know that all players make a few character choices they regret, and MMOs usually have Respec options for good reason (...


19

Yes, this is fine. It's unlikely to lead to problems. In my games, I use a more aggressive rule. I tell players: "I want to make sure you're playing the character you want to play. Between sessions, if there's any decision about your character that you feel wasn't the right choice, feel free to change it. You can change your spells, your feats, your ...


57

This is known as a "re-spec", and it's reasonable on occasion. While changing one's character levels isn't a standard rule in D&D 5th edition, it's not unreasonable to allow a character to change a poorly-built character on a one-off basis like this. In fact, the Adventurer's Guild organized play rules explicitly allow low-level characters to do this: ...


7

It would not be unfair The game is designed so that class levels are meant to balance out. A level 5 warlock should be about as strong as a level 3 warlock/level 2 fighter. You could come up with some kind of justification in game to account for the change. Or you could just hand wave it. Ultimately the game is meant to be fun for everyone, not bogged down ...


7

No As the the Sage Advice Compendium ruling states: If you have spell slots, can you use them to cast the 1st-level spell you learn with the Magic Initiate feat? Yes, but only if the class you pick for the feat is one of your classes. The fact that the same spell appears on your druid spell list doesn't change that. You can still prepare and cast ...


5

In a campaign that otherwise adopts the 3.5 revision, an original druid would likely still be Tier 1 The druid was a Tier 1 class before the 3.5 revision. The changes made by the 3.5 revision only made the druid into a stronger Tier 1 class. That's not to say that the 3.5 revision didn't change the druid significantly. For example, the animal companion ...


10

The question is broad, so I will be giving a broad answer, without entering the specifics of each one of your sub-questions (as I feel that actually requiring an answer to each would result in closing the question). The general answer is: reliability gets punished, bursty stuff gets rewarded. With that in mind... Which classes are most affected? Classes ...


28

I'll step through each of the classes individually, but first the broad strokes: [Most] Spellcasters will fare much better than everyone else The main check on the power of a Spellcaster is their limited resources. If a Level 9 character uses a 5th Level Spell Slot, that's it: that's the only fifth level spell they'll get for the whole day. Wizards and ...


3

Some axioms I have here: When it’s conceivable for the order of levels to not matter, there should be a strong preference for having it not matter. There are definitely parts of the game where it is unavoidable for the order to matter (primarily, but not exclusively, 1st-level benefits), but every time it matters, the game gets more complex in unnecessary ...


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