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4

Typically no as warlock invocations are usually spell-like abilities and, as such, require concentration Warlock invocations like the least invocation hideous blow (Complete Arcane 134) are typically spell-like abilities (CAr 7), and "[u]sing a spell-like ability… works like casting a spell in that it requires concentration…" (Player's Handbook 142). ...


6

The extraordinary ability great power, great expense of the wizard archetype pact wizard says, in part, "At 5th level, the pact wizard chooses one oracle curse, using 1/2 his character level as his effective oracle level when determining the effects of this curse" (emphasis mine). Half the pact wizard's level isn't the pact wizard's effective oracle level ...


28

Attempting to discover class is missing the point Class is a metagame concept. Although it maps to the game world, there is no way for a PC to know it. Besides, that's not really what you are trying to ask. Put class out of your mind completely, ask yourself "how can my PCs discover that this character has secretly taken on a warlock patron and is the ...


0

Reading the quote in context reveals its meaning, it even comes with examples: Spells Known and Prepared. You determine what spells you know and can prepare for each class individually, as if you were a single-classed member of that class. If you are a ranger 4/wizard 3, for example, you know three 1st-level ranger spells based on your levels in the ...


2

@MivaScott's answer is correct in terms of how the question is precisely phrased (can my PCs detect an NPC's class mechanically). However, if your intent is to allow your PCs to discover that this NPC is indebted to a patron and gets power from them, which I think is your real goal here, your players could take a look at this question on ways to detect ...


4

To hide that he is a warlock from the players meta knowledge, do not describe his abilities with meta terms. When he casts an Eldritch Blast, don't say Eldritch Blast, but instead describe that he invokes some magic. An Arcana check would then be a good tool for them to find out more about that magic ingame. But you already know that one. From there you ...


3

The only thing that comes to mind for me is an ability that the Fighter subclass Battlemaster gets at 7th level. If you spend a minute interacting with someone outside of combat, you can learn whether you are superior to, inferior to, or the equal of the other creature in one of a number of stats. One of those stats is total level. It won’t outright say “hey ...


24

NPCs don't follow the same rules as PCs. They don't necessarily have any class at all, just a collection of abilities. Look at the Archmage, for example: Spellcasting. The archmage is an 18th-level spellcaster. Its spellcasting ability is Intelligence (spell save DC 17, +9 to hit with spell attacks). The archmage can cast disguise self and invisibility at ...


68

Class is a game mechanic, not an identification 1 As explained very well in this answer, there is no such thing within the game as a "class". It is just a tool to help players design their character, a set of rules by which the game is played, and a label for quickly describing concepts. There can be no in-game tool to reveal such a thing. It would be like ...


-2

There is a class for D&D 5e on dandwiki called the Runepriest. At level 1, it gets the Runecasting feature, which says: Runes have a casting time of 1 action (unless specified otherwise) and are cast by tracing them with your fingers, usually on a surface or in the air. Placed runes can be almost invisible if you so choose and an Intelligence (...


4

Classes never let you take just “any feat,” or even “any feat you qualify for.” They always have some kind of restriction—whether it’s a specific feat, or something off of a small list, or any feat that matches certain characteristics or has a certain tag, there’s always something. For example, the Pathfinder fighter can choose any “Combat” feat they qualify ...


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