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1

With enough effort, yes, absolutely. The real key here will be making most of the abilities scale base on your level. For example, bardic inspiration or maneuver masters die size, and monks unarmed strike damage all scale base on the level of the character in that class. The other option is to have the sub-classes grant bonuses based on what other subclass ...


1

Maybe, but it would require a fundamental redesign of subclasses, or design of a new feature, to work Allowing a PC to take two options at once would present balance difficulties, as you have already surmised. You could build new features to enable such a system, since the Warlock does give some bit of a precedent of how that'd work. Consider the Warlock ...


9

It only had the levels 11-20 in the third iteration The first two releases (articles here1 and here) only had level 1 to 10. For the third iteration it was extended to level 20, as noted in the article: [T]he class now goes to level 20, has six subclasses, and can choose from many new psionic disciplines and talents. 1: Note that the article has been ...


7

You just can't compare the two D&D is, by and large, generic fantasy. Each of the worlds has some specific flavor or flavors but it is intended to be setting where the main characters are heroes expected to triumph over the odds. Warhammer 40K is a grim, dark setting where each individual tends to have about as much worth as a grain of sand on a beach. ...


4

No, advanced monsters/NPCs with class levels in a single class are not multiclassed As the DMG describes, you can add class levels to an existing creature to make it more powerful: You can use the rules in chapter 3 of the Player’s Handbook to give class levels to a monster. For example, you can turn an ordinary werewolf into a werewolf with four levels ...


13

The Sidekick rules can help you There is something that can help you with an NPC/Monster giving levels; the Sidekick rules. Released in this UA article (also officially in the Essentials Kit) are rules for applying class levels for what is essentially a simplified version of a PC class (either "Warrior", "Spellcaster" or "Expert") to an NPC/Monster of CR 1 ...


2

Here be Dragons! I enjoyed reading your Homebrew class. It is interesting and I think on the whole it is closer to being balanced. I think it needs further tweaking and definitely some play-testing. It is good to see you have already modified some of the greater aspects from the previous thread. Main and secondary ability I agree with Dexterity being the ...


7

Improve homebrew attempts by comparing to published classes In this case, there is an Alchemist sub class of the Artificer in the latest setting book (Eberron: Rising From the Last War) or in the Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron. The two examples embody refinements from the Unearthed Arcana Artificer/Alchemist that was available for play test. We used the play ...


25

Necessary? No, but... No, it is not necessary; a class will certainly function and be playable without any archetypes. For any one character, it won’t really even be noticeable. The purpose of archetypes is to give a clear way in which different members of a class are, in fact, different from one another. They also provide an easy route to expansion—if ...


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