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30

Yes, each player has the right to refuse a compel. But you already knew that, really. It's not a "group compel" at all, there's no such thing. Since every player in the group has the aspect, you're making multiple individual event compels. The issue is wrapping our heads around what that means for the narrative, which turns out to be kinda cool. Refusing ...


25

Summary: Negative aspects are easy "push button here" dispensers for Fate points, but spamming that button needlessly is boring at best. Two things need to be kept in mind: drama, and the Fate point economy. Being stymied or drained of Fate points by the same problem over and over isn't dramatic or interesting, so don't do it. But the Fate points must flow! ...


24

I'm going to dodge the main question, because it's a situation that shouldn't come up. Here's why: The situation you've outlined there involves at least two compels, not one. The first compel is the one already mentioned, which results in the transformation if the player accepts. The second compel, which you've skipped in the example, is compelling Ravenous ...


22

None of these happen. They don't make sense or aren't using those mechanics properly, and ultimately, it's going to take a lot more than that to get this guy to join the war. A preliminary dip into basics. Since compels and invokes seem to be getting mishandled here, I'm going to take a brief dip into what they're for and how they work. Compelling characters ...


20

What Ryan did in that video was suggest that there was an Aspect in the game that wasn't written down but was obviously there based on what was being roleplayed. Wil and the others at the table agreed, and so Ryan compelled the aspect at the same time that he brought it up. See Creating and Discovering New Aspects In Play If you’re not looking for a free ...


18

When you pay to propose a compel, the point you paid returns to the GM's infinite pool of fate points. The proposed compel is then negotiated with the target of the compel. Once the compel is agreed, a fate point is paid from the infinite pool of fate points to the target player. If the target player rejects the compel, their fate point is also paid to ...


18

First, decide how it works in the fiction Figure out the actual fictional constraints the spell imposes. Specifically: Is the effect absolute or something you can resist through force of will (or whatever)? Are you compelled to speak truthfully, or simply prevented from lying? In other words, can you choose silence or omission? You could crib from the ...


17

The GM and Fate Points: GMs, you also get to use fate points, but the rules are a little bit different than the rules for players. When you award players fate points for compels or concession, they come out of an unlimited pool you have for doing so—you don’t have to worry about running out of fate points to award, and you always get to ...


17

Let's see what the SRD has to say on the matter 1. Players pay up, the GM compels for free if a player wants to compel another character, it costs a fate point to propose the complication. The GM can always compel for free, and any player can propose a compel on his or her own character for free (ref). What this means for you : if the GM compels an NPC, ...


16

The key to conceding from a compelled action lies in understanding the narrative purpose of compels and concessions: they make scenes more dramatic by adding new complications to the story. So if a werewolf gets compelled to attack his friends, it's an excellent complication with awesome dramatic tension. But we don't want to just kill everyone off--that's ...


14

Standardising free invokes as spendable for compels will break the fate point economy and pull the teeth out of compels. The fate point economy is one of the only things that the Core book and Toolkit tell us not to mess with much, because it's the heart of the system and balanced very carefully. A free invoke is a +2 on a roll. It can only be spent on one ...


13

No, compels do not cost the GM anything. From the Fate-SRD Finally, and this is very important: if a player wants to compel another character, it costs a fate point to propose the complication. The GM can always compel for free, and any player can propose a compel on his or her own character for free.


12

Every time an aspect introduces a meaningful complication into your character's life, you should probably get a Fate point for it; who suggested the complication is largely irrelevant. Self compels are almost identical to regular compels! You suggest a way your character's life gets more complicated or dramatic because of an aspect in play; the suggestion ...


12

An aspect is just a mechanical reminder of a thing that's true in the story: it's always "on." This means some actions are possible or impossible, easier or harder, because of the thing the aspect describes. However, sometimes an aspect COULD make an action or event easier or extra complicated, but it doesn't have to. This is where compels and invokes come ...


12

Does conceding make sense within the narrative? Has something happened to make it make sense in the narrative for the Ravenous and Bloodthirsty Wolf to want to withdraw from the conflict before obtaining its desired outcome? If so, absolutely. Come to an agreement with the GM and other players about how the conflict should resolve itself. If not... Why ...


10

There is no set "rule" on how serious it should be. Being a narrative component to the game, the severity is also hand-wavy. The compel should be severe enough that your players stop to think about it, maybe even give the GM—or whoever is offering the compel—an eyebrow raise, but not so severe that they pay it off without thinking. It's an art, to be sure, ...


9

Make the compel worth the price. If the Geometer simply showing up means Fate points are handed out like candy, make him challenging enough that they'll need those four points whenever he shows up! Giving him more stunts, or more powerful stunts, would be a decent place to start in doing that. Compels aren't always the right choice. If you're struggling ...


8

In addition to being invokable and compellable, aspects are True: if the NPC is a Stout Pacifist you're perfectly within your rights as a GM to have them refuse to get involved as a belligerent, no invoke or compel necessary. If the player is trying to get the NPC to give a different kind aid, the aspect would be a good candidate for an invoke (to make the ...


7

I'd say both options 1 and 2, and in that order. The GM offers the compel, and the player can accept it, gain a fate point and sit down. Or he may refuse it, paying a fate point, which lets him continue with trying to convince the NPC as a challenge. The GM still has the option to make that challenge harder by invoking the aspect. Since the aspect is on ...


6

You get Fate Points from adverse invokes at the end of the scene. Here, under invoking aspects: If the aspect you invoke is on someone else’s character sheet, including situation aspects attached to them, and the invoke is to their disadvantage, you give them the fate point you spent. (Invoking a third party’s aspect is treated just like invoking an ...


5

It seems against the spirit of things, but the GM is the final say on compels (Fate Core, p. 71). Also, concession was not the burglar's only choice. Based on the example compel texts, this situation might read something like - "BurglarPC, because your rival is "Quite a Cunning Conman" and there's only "One Way Out", it makes sense that he'd Lock you in. ...


5

All Fate Points spent to propose or refuse a compel are lost. Just spend them and they're gone. The GM doesn't pay to compel, ever, and players don't pay to compel their own character. If the GM pays to refuse a compel on one of their characters, it comes out of the scene pool. Informally speaking, if you think a compel would apply to someone else's ...


4

Using Fate Core: Can this character still fire until someone compels Out of ammo? No. The aspect became true the minute it was created. Is it the GM responsibility to compel here? Or should we simply provide him a FATE point directly (when he receive the aspect) as it limits his action anyway? No. A compel means that a new interesting thing happened ...


4

The severity of a compel depends on your game group. Compelling is a trade and if you find your players always paying to avoid your compels (or each other's) then the severity is too high. A timid group of players new to role-playing might not want surprises in the same way a group of seasoned and gonzo players might take any compel you give them just for ...


4

A compel should be severe enough for the compelling player to justify the fate point expenditure, and plausible enough for the compelled player so that they may consider accepting it. What that means depends so much on your story…


4

You don't compel your own aspects. As it says though, you're free to suggest at any time that an aspect of yours could be compelled — by someone else, that is. If in response to your suggestion the GM or the group nod or say "yeah, great idea" or similar, then someone else — the GM or another player, as usual — will follow up their agreement by doing the ...


4

As you stated, good Aspects have both positive and negative implications. If you see an opportunity for the negative implications of your aspects to come into play, use those to get your Fate pool going. You suggest the compel, the GM says whether it's valid, and you get the Fate point. I had players with the following Aspects, and the negative uses ...


3

When you give someone a Fate Point for a Compel the severity of said compel only depends on what your group can agree on. As far as Fate is concerned one of the biggest ideas is to make sure everyone can agree/have agency. as long as any compel you give has any consequence that must be dealt with the only obstacle to it being a good compel is if everyone ...


3

There's no reason you can't use an aspect on an area to compel, so the premise of #2 is a bit flawed. :) That said, #4 is a solid option, because aspects provide rationale for active opposition. Consider having the mage roll to defend against any effort to lie (Will vs. Deceive, or whatever) once the Zone is in place.


2

Some Aspects are more absolute than others. If a room is filled with "Absolute Darkness", that's going to make certain things absolutely impossible, without an invoke. "Dark" might just mean that it has to be Overcome. Or not. All depends how Dark it is. "Dazed" doesn't mean they can't Shoot. What it most means, outside of whatever way they and you ...


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