100

Yes, Snakes can be prone Conditions Prone is a condition (PHB, 290). And the only way to avoid that condition is to have some form of immunity or something else mechanically that prevents a creature from getting the condition. For creatures, the statblock lists Condition immunities (if there are any). Spells, items, etc. will also state if there are any ...


60

While these are two contrary rules exceptions, and therefore ambiguous, from a story perspective, Sculpt Spell is intended to represent the evoker guiding their damaging spell to avoid the target, so it doesn't matter if they actively dodge the attack or not; it just doesn't hit them (or at least has the minimum possible effect). So I would say Sculpt Spell ...


54

A petrified character weighs 10 times their normal weight This is answered in the first bullet point of the petrified condition (emphasis added): A petrified creature is transformed, along with any nonmagical object it is wearing or carrying, into a solid inanimate substance (usually stone). Its weight increases by a factor of ten, and it ceases aging....


51

Not going RAW The player is not "willingly" moving closer to the dragon, they are unknowingly doing so. They can keep moving closer to the dragon up until they become aware of the dragon's location. This one. Reasoning: Frightened is obviously supposed to be a "bad" condition. Being able to know where the dragon is from it would be, sometimes, better than ...


48

It levels the playing field Casting darkness will cancel out both advantage and disadvantage, due to the way they stack. If your opponent has advantage and you have disadvantage, then cancelling both will be good for you, and bad for them. It benefits those who can see through magical darkness Some characters (eg, Warlocks with Devil's Sight) can see ...


46

It depends on which spell you use to bring back the dead. There are five different spells that you can use to bring a dead person back to life, and they all work a bit differently, as you might expect. Raise Dead From the spell description: This spell also neutralizes any poisons and cures nonmagical diseases that affected the creature at the time ...


44

No, because it depends on the effect that is causing the condition. You cannot save against a condition, you save against an effect (a spell, item, monster, maneaver, etc) The same condition might be opposed by different abilities, when it comes from different sources. The Cleric Spell Divine Word, for example, can apply Blinded, Deafened, or Stunned if ...


39

I would say that Alex can no longer finish their turn, as they are immediately Stunned and therefore incapacitated. Stunned A stunned creature is incapacitated (see the condition), can’t move, and can speak only falteringly. To me, this is no different than if the Monk had attacked normally, without using the Stunning effect, and reduced Alex ...


39

If you cannot see your opponent then you cannot use any spell or feature that says "that you can see". For example, you cannot: Use Protection fighting style. Use Uncanny Dodge. Make Opportunity Attacks. Cast any spells that require a target you can see. Your attack rolls will be at normal (the advantage for the target not seeing you is negated by the ...


39

That's correct: the beholder's Charm Ray does not have a repeating save. The other rays you've quoted show what it would look like if it were there, and it's not. You're also correct that while charmed the PC cannot attack the beholder or target it with harmful effects, per PHB p.290 ("Appendix A: Conditions"). Beholders, amirite?


38

The lore given in the Monster Manual provides an answer The stat block of any monster is not given in isolation, the Source Book (in this case the Monster Manual) provides lore of each monster presented, and there is no fluff text in 5e (it's rules text all the way down). Creature of Ritual. [...] The overwhelming terror that foreshadows a mummy’s ...


37

Yes, unconscious creatures still roll saving throws. "Automatically fails Strength and Dexterity saving throws" implies that other saving throws do not automatically fail. The phrasing would be different if they intended all saves to automatically fail. PHB p.179 states "A saving throw—also called a save—represents an attempt to resist a spell, a trap, a ...


36

If the source of the Frightened condition isn't within line of sight, you're still Frightened, but you don't suffer some of the effects of being Frightened. A frightened creature has disadvantage on ability checks and attack rolls while the source of its fear is within line of sight. The creature can't willingly move closer to the source of its fear. ...


36

The basic (but unwritten) rule is that spells do not do things that are not in their description. There is a price to pay for standing up and misty step and other similar spells do not waive it. But there is a way around this. (Inspired by this answer.) At the end of a fall, a creature takes 1d6 bludgeoning damage for every 10 feet it fell, to a ...


35

Give him the Blind keyword and Tremorsense 0 The Blind keyword states that the creature uses special senses to 'see' within a specified range. The quotes are intentional because see is used as a game term here. The Blinded condition and the many vision-obscuring powers define not seeing something as it having total concealment against you. You can give ...


34

Prone is a condition, and the Conditions section (page 290 of the PHB) says this: A condition lasts either until it is countered (the prone condition is countered by standing up, for example) or for a duration specified by the effect that imposed the condition. Teleporting doesn't say anything about countering conditions in general or the Prone ...


34

Yes. The condition states everything you're not allowed to do: Actions (which also prevents Bonus Actions, per PHB p. 189: "anything that deprives you of your ability to take actions also prevents you from taking a bonus action") Reactions Moving is none of those, so you can do it. Keep in mind, though, that most effects that incapacitate also cause ...


34

Usually a creature has only a single opportunity attack available To make an opportunity attack a creature needs to use their reaction to do so. From the rules on opportunity attacks (emphasis mine): You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature that you can see moves out of your reach. To make the opportunity attack, you use your reaction ...


33

The rules that you've quoted are pretty clear. You gain advantage when attacking unconscious creatures, and you gain disadvantage when attacking prone creatures from further than 5 feet away. If you have both advantage and disadvantage — you're attacking an unconscious creature from further than 5 feet away — you get neither, instead.


32

Petrified is a condition, like sickened or poisoned. Many spells can remove harmful conditions — Greater Restoration lists petrification. It is currently the only one, short of Wish. Wish can either emulate Greater Restoration directly (its "duplicate a spell" functionality), or as part of a greater effect healing all hit points and removing all conditions ...


32

RAW, there's no way to escape Not without a spell, class or racial feature, magic item, or other effect that allows you to bypass Paralysis. If the effect itself is resisted via STR/DEX, and paralysis causes STR/DEX saves to automatically fail, then the character would fail all their attempts to break the effect. This feels like a situation where an ...


31

Yes, I have encountered this as both a player and GM. All of your solutions CAN work, but are dependant on the group's reactions and way of doing things. Some groups are technical and a bit meta-gamish--which while I don't personally love meta-gaming, sometimes it's fun for people, and they like the mechanic aspect--as long as everyone KNOWS what you mean ...


31

RAW: Unclear As written, the Hallow spell does not specify any of this, as you noted. I can't find any mention of Hallow in the Sage Advice Compendium or the PHB Errata, and I couldn't find any unofficial tweets by Jeremy Crawford referencing this use of Hallow either, so we have little to go on as for the designer intent. Recommended: Both If the ...


30

The Blinded condition affects Ability Checks that rely on sight. It says nothing about Saving Throws, so you can make a Saving Throw just fine, of any kind.


30

No, a surprised character can't drop prone As you posted, Surprise says: If you're surprised, you can't move or take an action... This "can't move" terminology is actually used a lot in the rules. A few other examples: Petrified: The creature is incapacitated (see the condition), can't move or speak, and is unaware of its surroundings. Stunned: ...


28

The conditions are linked so the Barbarian would be neither paralyzed nor frightened The Dreadful Glare feature simply states: [...] If the target fails the saving throw by 5 or more, it is also paralyzed for the same duration [...] emphasis is mine. You can't also be paralyzed if you are not frightened in the first place. Even if you were ...


27

The Amorphous Enemy is Not Affected We know the following about nets from the item's description in the Player's Handbook (bold added): A net has no effect on creatures that are formless, or creatures that are Huge or larger. (PHB, p. 148). Although "formless" isn't a tag or formal term (like "shapeshifter") which clearly applies to certain creatures ...


27

Your answer is also contained in your first descriptive sentence. You touch a willing creature and put it into a cataleptic state that is indistinguishable from death. (Emphasis mine). If you are flailing around, singing and making saves, that is very obviously distinguishable from death. So just by that caveat alone it would prevent the activity you ...


26

Mechanically... In order to attempt to pin an opponent, they must first be on the ground, or perhaps pressed flat up against a solid surface like a wall. In order to put them there, you'll need to Shove them, requiring an Athletics Check on your part, opposed by an Athletics or Acrobatics check on their part (allows for Forced Movement to press them into ...


26

No, burning hands targets the creatures in its AOE Burning hands is noted as having targets specifically in the DMG The DMG specifically calls out the creatures affected by burning hands to be targets in an example: For example, if a wizard directs burning hands (a 15-foot cone) at a nearby group of orcs, you could use the table and say that two orcs ...


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