64

This question is campaign setting specific. Fortunately, thanks to the Spelljammer campaign setting, the answer is actually known for some of the major published prime worlds. Krynn (Dragonlance) and Toril (Forgotten Realms) are both planets that orbit around their respective suns and spin on their axies as they do so; At night, their suns are in the same ...


44

This is addressed directly in Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes The first chapter is all about the Blood War. A very simplified and brief synopsis of the reasons the Blood War is a stalemate: Demons have quantity Devils have quality There are groups and individuals acting as intentionally balancing forces who are sufficiently powerful to manage any side that ...


27

There are several fundamental planes: the Astral Sea, the Elemental Chaos, the Mortal World, and the World's two echoes: the Feywild (from which the Eladrin came), and the Shadowfell. And then there's Sigil, the city of doors, a plane which doesn't quite fit in anywhere and may not rightly exist inside this particular cosmology at all. There's also the Far ...


27

Noted in your forum thread, but the best descriptions of Acheron and Carceri that I have seen—based in, but not directly quoted from, actual text—are those by Jade Ripley (who goes by Lord_Gareth here and numerous other places, including GiantITP.com’s forums): Acheron Acheron has no architects. None of the Outer Planes do. [...] Yes, Acheron looks a ...


26

No one in power wants the Blood War to end just yet Neither Hell’s archdukes nor the demon princes are especially interested in ending the Blood War right now. Both have their own schemes independent of the Blood War that they would rather pursue than the war itself. All of them do want to win the War, and assume they eventually will, but none of them are ...


20

Primarily, this is based on precedent Each of these planes was introduced in the article "Planes: The Concepts of Spatial, Temporal and Physical Relationships in D&D", in The Dragon #8, released July 1977. The alignments of these planes seem to have been set way back then and have been generally maintained with some minor alterations. There are good ...


20

Mystra's Weave and the Multiverse Using the Planescape parlance, this question is in the style of a "clueless prime". The Planescape setting is actually an over-setting, covering all of the other settings: even those that are isolationists like the Dark Sun or Ravenloft. Forgotten Realms is just one prime world amongst many others. It would be ...


17

Great Wheel—1e kinda, 2e, 3e, 5e You are correct that the Great Wheel cosmology was used in at least 2e, 3e, and 5e. It was codified, and most thoroughly detailed, in 2e’s Planescape setting. Prior to Planescape, the cosmology wasn’t named, but nonetheless something sort of like the Great Wheel had been gradually developing and emerging from the various ...


16

The Weave is not limited to Toril. The Players Handbook (p.205) does not limit the Weave to Toril, not even to the Forgotten Realms. It seems that only the name "Weave" is limited to the Realms. The same Information Box mentions, that "in places where the Weave is damaged or torn, magic works in unpredictable ways - or not at all." and "all magic depends ...


16

That image you're using is one I created for the Unofficial White Wolf Wiki. I founded the Wiki, work for the current publishers of Mage, and 2001's Guide to the Traditions was my first RPG credit. I've been steeped in Mage lore for a very long time. Earlier books use "Horizon" a little liberally and inconsistently. I'm pretty sure it wasn't until Revised ...


13

There is not a canonical "D&D" answer. The answer differs per campaign world. I know it's a little weird - the D&D 3 core books don't present themselves as a generic system per se; they hint at a shared cosmology with the gods, certain roles for the races, etc. that makes it seem like there's a larger world there. But it's just a hollow shell, to ...


13

Frame Challenge (pun intended): The rules of D&D are not a physics simulator. This question goes beyond what the rules are concerned with, and beyond what is necessary for adjudicating the rules. If there are any edge cases that actually depend on a substantive answer to this question (there aren’t), it will be entirely up to the DM. That said, I use a ...


12

In a fantasy setting, the sun does not need to be a 100% physical entity, nor obey any laws of physics that get in the way of a good tale. Your physical fireball that must pass through the earth at some mystical location is nicely self-consistent (ignoring real-world physics of it) and pretty cool, although I don't think anything like it is referenced in D&...


12

No, there's no overarching "truth" about where the gods come from in the implied setting of D&D 3.5. It's left up to the DM to detail this (if ever), like usual with blanks in published settings. However, if you dig into more specific D&D settings, you'll find creation myths that are more or less "the truth". In Greyhawk (from whence most of D&...


12

Misty Step does not transit the caster through the ethereal plane Traditionally, it's a Fey spell that transforms you into a 'silver mist' Flavour-wise, the original form of the spell was more akin to Gaseous Form than Teleport: You turn into a silver mist and move a short distance before reforming. There's no movement between planes. Misty Step was first ...


10

I think the only problem you can find is that you may lack of mechanics to specific setting elements. For instance, you have Ventrue in both books, but AFAIK you don't have Tremere in NWOD. There are many bloodlines that exist in both settings, but are too different. Another examples would be Paths of Enlightenment or Thaumaturgy Paths (I think). Mage: The ...


10

There is, RAW, no concept or definition of "owning" a plane While gods can have divine realms, the Forgotten Realms concept of whole Outer Planes ruled over by a small number of gods is both unique to that setting (meaning rules in other sources such as Deities & Demigods do not support it) and not given parameters within that setting. The Outer Planes ...


10

In the history of the Weave it has been destroyed twice, once when an Arch-Wizard attempted to steal the power of Mystra, which destabilized the Weave, resulting in the requirement that Mystra sacrifice herself to maintain it. During the period which Mystra was dead, magic was non-functional until she was reincarnated. The second time it happened, Mystra ...


9

There is no canonical answer to this question In no published source that touches on the eladrin, and there really aren't that many, is there a canonical answer pre-4E (and 4e ones are just high elves). The celestials have always gotten less attention and detail than the fiends, for obvious reasons. We actually don't have a firm origin, or even suggested ...


8

You are right that Demiurge is a term already in use by another game line. The Lexicon of Promethean: the Created defines a Demiurge as a mortal human who wields Divine Fire to create a Promethean, who then becomes the Progenitor of a new Lineage of the Created. (p. 26) Saturnine Night Chapter 1: "Demiurges in the Modern Age" goes into extensive detail on ...


8

Petitioners can't leave their plane. According to Manual of the Planes, p. 55, petitioners are bound to their plane and cannot be made to leave: Planar Commitment: Petitioners cannot leave the plane they inhabit. They are teleported one hundred miles in a random direction if an attempt is made to force them to leave.


7

My Hypothesis is that this is a Life vs Machine, sort of scenario. Demon the Descent p52 Some demons believe qashmallim are angels that somehow escaped the God-Machine’s control and now operate under a different set of principles. Whatever the truth, these beings resemble angels. Instead of serving an alien intelligence that craves order, however,...


7

It is up to the DM. While researching this question, I have found nothing definitive, but I have found some things that can help guide a DM toward a ruling. The gods get their power from you, not the other way around. In the description of Nyx, the realm of the gods, we see this description of the gods and their power: Though the gods live in a veritable ...


6

If you choose to keep the Masquerade cosmology in Requiem, you'll need to address the issue of Generation. In Masquerade, your distance from Caine (and, thus, your social standing and maximal level of vampire power) is fixed at the Embrace, barring diablerie. This sets the stage for some of the big conflicts, like elders vs. neonates and sects vs. anarchs. ...


5

This is left intentionally vague for the storyteller to best interpret as the story requires. And taking every intepretation across a chronicle would certainly not be out of place for a game of W:tO. As a rule of thumb though you can think of the Shadowlands part of the underworld as the analogue to Earth merely superimposed and twisted over it where space ...


4

Your key resources on getting more detail than the Dungeon Master's Guide offers are the Manual of the Planes, and supplements like The Plane Above and The Plane Below (for the Astral Sea and Elemental Chaos, respectively). The planes are not each separate universes. Travel between them is another matter entirely. As I write about in What are the planes of ...


4

The term Demiurge comes from Gnosticism. The idea is that God (sometimes called the Monad) created the universe, but has largely been hands-off since them, and in particular, it is not responsible for creating our world. According to Gnostics, the world was created by the Demiurge: a lesser god, created by the Monad, who has gone insane and thinks that it is ...


4

I believe that ownership of planes (barring lawful-aligned planes which are likely to have actual laws governing their ownership) is probably not a legal state. Lolth probably owns her layer of the Abyss by killing everyone else who lays claim to it and loudly proclaiming it to be hers until everyone agrees that she is the undisputed owner of the layer. To ...


4

Even with the translation guides, WoD players are a mixed bag of personalities. This, aside from rules hiccups, will be a massive hurdle. Why? People will potentially argue the rules. Part of a game is the rules, part is setting, part of it is how people interpret it. It's that difference in interpretation that could cause the break. I've run both types of ...


4

It's whatever you want it to be. As stated by Thomas, it isn't a physics simulator, it's a framework to enable enjoyable play. So if you want a Glyph cast on a moving city to activate when the city comes within range of something, sure. If you want to cast it on a chest on a ship but have it be relative to the ship as well, sure. If there is an absolute ...


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