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You’re conflating several issues. There’s Dungeons & Dragons (in its various editions), the d20 System, the d20 System Trademark License (with associated d20 System Trademark Guide), the Open Game License, and System Reference Documents. You didn’t raise any concerns about it, but the Game System License is also a part of this story. The d20 System The ...


8

Here's the thing about the OGL. You don't actually need to use it just to reuse unpatented game mechanics. What the OGL does is provide what's known in legal terms as a safe harbor, in return for accepting restrictions on your reuse of mechanics. That means that as long as you follow the terms of the OGL, they agree not to throw lawyers at you (and ...


6

D&D 3.0 and 3.5, though these inspired later editions. The article d20 System Definitions: Frequently Asked Questions, published by Wizards of the Coast in 2001, defines "d20 System" as follows: Q: What is meant by the term "d20 System"? A: The term refers to the game engine used in Wizards of the Coast's hobby gaming roleplaying ...


3

In a setting like city streets that are aligned north-south and east-west, traveling on a hexagonal grid in one direction will have similar experience to traveling along the diagonal in a square grid.


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