37

The way you handled it does technically fulfill the "worse outcome" choice for the GM. However, you ended up in the same situation you were in before. Nothing changed. The PC is still on the wrong side of the Troll they wanted to get past, and neither the PC's nor the Troll's state has changed for the better or worse (from what you describe, at least). Not ...


31

Remember, the player doesn't get to declare a move, they get to describe a response in the fiction. If you've advertised a threat, like a hill giant's club rushing at a character and the character ignores it, that's what the book calls a golden opportunity. When that happens, you can make a move as hard as you like. Remember that what makes a hard move is ...


31

It isn't up to you to make your players defy danger with any particular stat. It's up to the players to describe how they defy the danger in a way which plays to their own strengths and by doing so indicate the stat they use: "The riders charge straight at you, whooping over the thundering hooves. What do you do ?" "I counter-charge with my shield to ...


30

And Now The Rest Of The Quotation "worse outcome, hard bargain, or ugly choice" is language quoted from Dungeon World's parent game, Apocalypse World. Specifically from the downside to the move Do Something Under Fire, or Act Under Fire depending on whether you're looking at first or second edition. Dungeon World tends to fall a little short in the area ...


27

First things first, your worse outcome was perfectly fine. It just has to be a success (because a partial hit is a success), but worse than if they'd got a hit (10+) would have resulted in. So think of what a hit would have made happen, and then think of something that's worse but still a success. Losing something but still avoiding the danger is a perfect ...


19

In Dungeon World, it's very important to get the carts and the horses in the right order, else it annoys the pig and the metaphors get horribly mixed. Moves come second, never first. If you find yourself looking at a move and asking yourself, "How do I make that work?" then you've got the cart in front of the horse and you need to start over. Always ...


19

7-9 is the "Yes, but..." result Rolling 7-9 means a success, but in a way the player didn't fully expect: On a 7–9, you stumble, hesitate, or flinch: the GM will offer you a worse outcome, hard bargain, or ugly choice. The key difference is — does the player have any choice or not: hard bargain — "yes you can do it, but you have to do X beforehand" or "...


10

There's a very important detail you seem to be missing: The players don't declare moves. They describe what their character is doing, and a move is resolved only if that description matches the move's trigger. And if the description ignores the threat and triggers some other move, then it is time for you to make a move (as hard as you like), because ...


8

Your outcome was invalid According to the Defy Danger description, a 7-9 will offer a bunch of action results that may or may not require the player to have a choice. ✴On a 10+, you do what you set out to, the threat doesn’t come to bear. ✴On a 7–9, you stumble, hesitate, or flinch: the GM will offer you a worse outcome, hard bargain, or ugly choice. You ...


6

Whether they need to Defy Danger to get a chance to Hack & Slash can depend on a number of variables. If the Hill Giant's Reach is greater than the player's, the player might need to Defy Danger to avoid the club and get close enough for them to be able to use their weapon. If you've already used a Soft Move to establish the danger of the club swinging ...


6

In my most recent game, players defied danger with WIS to avoid a fear effect, defied danger with INT or WIS (their choice) to hack and slash while blinded, and defied danger with INT to attempt to communicate to an intelligent but borderline hostile creature without a language in common. These weren't all "mental dangers" so much as dangers that could be ...


5

Mental situations that could cause stress and be defied: Fear - Some kind of real and otherworldly horror (que Call of Cthulhu) Lack of air, as it runs out the realisation of this can induce panic Screaming/Sonic overwhelming - a cacophony of voices that confuse the mind Vertigo - an otherwise easy jump, but the drop is thousands of feet Dangerous puzzles - ...


4

Intelligence: Statistically, orcs attack in one of these 5 patterns 97% of the time, and by moving like this I avoid all 5 of those patterns as I run through their ranks. (Basically gun katas from Equilibrium.) Wisdom: Spotting a slight gap in their lines where one looks uncertain, I manage to slip through. Charisma: I fake 'em out. Orcs are easy to fool. ...


3

Respect intent. Every scenario is different in the fiction, so every scenario is worth talking through. I think so, anyway, and there's an extra important point to make here. Anyway, as per over here lemme factor out things along the standard split and see how they apply to your scenario. But here's your important point: respect intent. Your player wanted to ...


2

Rolling a move can always make things worse. Sometimes, it's a viable choice to deliberately accept incoming consequences in order to avoid the chance of worse things occurring. When someone rolls a 6- on Defy Danger, this means that two things happen: They take the consequences of the danger that they failed to avoid (damage, etc.) Something else happens ...


2

First off, the Players don't really determine what moves they make, they say what they are doing and you say what mechanical move fit's best. You should set the scene (something like "the giant is swinging its club down at you, you have an instant to react, what do you do?") then they say how their character reacts while sticking to the fiction (so if they ...


1

Moves reflect things that happen in the fiction. It's important to keep your fiction synced with your players'. So, one of the important things about getting to grips with any Apocalypse Engine game in general, and Dungeon World in specific, is to internalize that there is no seperate mechanical action called "making a move". On the player end, it's saying ...


1

Assuming the following model of the mental attributes (Intelligence as learning, Wisdom as perception/intuition, Charisma as force of personality) and the tribal nature of Orcs there are plenty of ways to trigger this move. Intelligence Anything based on knowing something specific. Identifying this tribe of Orcs and their fear of the gesture they call The ...


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