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39

I think that the common cold should be kind of trivial to adventurers whose constitutions are likely several standard deviations above the mean. In the context of D&D diseases, getting a cold seems more like an annoyance than anything else. If you want, though, you could use the exhaustion mechanic (PHB291), which is a pre-existing mechanic that's well-...


31

Sadly the rules on curing disease do not seem to be organized in a single section of any of the rule books. Here are all the options I can find: Spells Lesser Restoration (2nd level) can end 1 disease afflicting the target Raise Dead (5th level, 500gp consumed material component) cures non-magical diseases that afflicted the deceased at the time of its ...


31

Not likely, but a case could be made for it This is a bit of a tricky area, but in general we have go with the idea that things do what they say they do and no more. As with all things 5e, a DM can choose to view it differently, but looking at it through a RAW lens implies that the Paladin would still suffer the effects. The case for Infestation As I ...


28

(these answers, IMO, also apply to the Monk's Purity of Body) RAW: Paladins are probably susceptible to Kyuss Worms Because of… Reasons. 5th edition did away with a lot of verbose text present in previous editions, in favor of "plain English interpretation". With that, we get a fallout of precise text that can be pointed to with that triumphant "A HA!" ...


27

Guidance can be taken from Xanathar's rules on Invalid Targets While abilities aren't stated to be included in this, the Optional Rules covered by Xanathar's about Invalid Targets (pages 85-6) can help direct on how to deal with this: If you cast a spell on someone or something that can’t be affected by the spell, nothing happens to that target, but if ...


25

Given the overall "heroic" tone of modern D&D (doesn't even account for reasonable maiming due to battle wounds, infection from same, etc.), I'd be strongly inclined to leave out piddly stuff like colds, indigestion (unless specific to Plot), corns, bunions, and ingrown toenails, and so forth. Heroes should have heroic afflictions, diseases that will ...


25

There is no disease condition or damage type in D&D 5e as noted here in this Stack Exchange question. Hence no corresponding immunities, etc. A case could be made that if a monster is immune to poison they are also immune to disease as two mechanics are similar when listed as an attack or effect. But in the RAW text no monsters and very few other things ...


25

Paladins aren't immune, because lycanthropy isn't a disease. Lycanthropes and lycanthropy are described in the Monster Manual (p. 206): One of the most ancient and feared of all curses, lycanthropy can transform the most civilized humanoid into a ravening beast. In its natural humanoid form, a creature cursed by lycanthropy appears as its normal self. ...


24

The Paladin is immune The fact that the saving throw is specifically against disease, and that Paladins are immune to disease means they should not have to make a save against this effect, regardless of what condition it applies on failure. I suspect that the 'poisoned' condition is a way of representing the penalty of being diseased since there isn't a ...


23

RAW: we don't know. "Transformed" isn't a defined term, so we have to infer meaning from context. In the Slaadi context I infer a complete transformation that includes mental stats, abilities, personality, alignment, &c. As "transform" isn't defined, we've got to look at its uses. Many times in the core set it's used in a context that has no bearing: an ...


23

In D&D, anything can happen. The books are there to be used as tools to help push your game forward, not to limit it. There are a variety of times, places, and reasons to stick faithfully to them simply because they are (hopefully) well-made, well-thought-out, and save you a lot of time and potentially headaches, but they do not necessarily define the ...


21

It cannot poison the paladin. A disease, mechanically, is not a condition. It itself can impose conditions to PCs or provide other effects. The paladin is immune to disease and hence immune to its conditions and effects that he would otherwise suffer from (in this case being poisoned and turning into an abyssal wretch). If a character was immune to being ...


20

As you say: the game makes no such distinction between mundane and magical diseases with this ability, with all diseases just being diseases as far as it's concerned. Divine Health will protect you from both the measles and death dog saliva, equally. This is congruent with how Paladins' miraculous healthiness works in many prior editions of the game too, so ...


16

Treat disease only takes ten minutes, and long-term care is eight hours of light activity for up to six patients. These seem both logically and mechanically compatible, until there are more than six patients.


14

As per 2018 PHB Errata, Contagion now applies poison before it applies disease; RAW, the disease is only applied after 3 failed Constitution Saves. New Contagion: Your touch inflicts disease. Make a melee spell attack against a creature within your reach. On a hit, the target is poisoned. At the end of each of the poisoned target's turns, the target ...


12

The rules as written don't say specifically. "Immune" doesn't carry any special meaning in 5e. An ordinary language interpretation of "immune" would be that a character immune to disease can't contract any diseases, and that any diseases they have are immediately cured. The DM may rule otherwise, although at the very least it would seem reasonable that ...


12

HIV and other bloodborne contagions are known to be transmitted by vampires since 1st Edition. It simply makes a Vampire HIV positive. He won't ever show all the usual symptoms of AIDS, but he will submit the disease if he isn't careful, and could get some other downsides from the illness destroying his Vitae. Below you find the relevant quotes from 1st to ...


11

A poison that appears to be an illness. Alternately, a Curse, like Mummy Rot. (Apparently this no longer works, since 3rd edition D&D started.) Divine Health (Ex) At 3rd level, a paladin is immune to all diseases, including supernatural and magical diseases, including mummy rot. Functionally, to give a Paladin a normal any disease you will ...


11

Greater Bestow Curse, Spell Compendium (pg. 27). It isn't listed on the normal effects of the spell but it says "You can also invent your own curse, but it should be no more powerful than those described above, and the Dungeon Master has the final say on the curse's effect." Killing someone in a span of 50 years is something I believe is weaker than the ...


11

Your DM would have to make a house rule. A character with Medicine proficiency should in theory be able to help another character more easily recover from injury, disease, or poison. There are specific injuries that do call for a Wisdom (Medicine) check, but I haven't found any RAW mechanics in this edition for using Medicine to end disease or the poisoned ...


9

Simply put, you can't become aware that you are diseased by yourself. They will know if they are feeling weaker, dizzy, confused, overwhelmed, annoyed than their usual selves, or if red dots start showing up all over their skin, or if their skin starts to peel off or fall apart (ew). But even a Heal check cannot tell exactly what disease a character has, ...


9

Take a page from an existing Published Adventure: "Out of the Abyss" Out of the Abyss (OotA) has this disease called Grackle-lung. It involves: Suffering gradually increasing levels of exhaustion Needing to succeed in a Constitution Check to be able to successfully cast any spell with a Verbal component and to take the Dash Action. It should be noted, ...


9

Exposure to inclement weather prevents the necessary concentration, as does any injury or failed saving throw the character might experience while studying. As a matter of English grammar, that "might" is synonymous with "if". The rule could be rephrased as: "Here are some things that might happen to you: (1) inclement weather; (2) injury; (3) failed ...


8

The absence of evidence is not the evidence of absence. In this case, at least, the above is true. Since the wording for wild shape does not explicitly say conditions are removed/dispelled, and disease is a condition, that condition is not dispelled upon shifting back. It can then be surmised that status affects such as poisoned, blinded, etc, are also not ...


8

Lesser restoration is stated as such in the Player's Handbook: Lesser Restoration 2nd-level abjuration Casting Time: 1 action Range: Touch Components: V, S Duration: Instantaneous You touch a creature and can end either one disease or one condition afflicting it. The condition can be blinded, deafened, paralyzed, or poisoned. It only ...


8

The hit point maximum loss is not immediate. The character has just taken damage from the slaad's claw and failed a saving throw: Claw. Melee Weapon Attack: +8 to hit, reach 5tf., one target. Hit: 12 (2d6 + 5) slashing damage. If the target is humanoid, it must succeed on a DC 15 Constitution save or be infected with a disease called chaos phage. While ...


8

That is a comprehensive list of diseases. Mummy Rot is not there because it is primarily a curse (it can be found here), being a disease is a minor part of it (removing a curse requires magic, a disease doesn't). However, a complete list of diseases specific to Golarion can be found on Pathfinder Wiki. A lot of references can be found in there to find the ...


7

First, ask the DM how disease host works Exactly what diseases a creature with at least one level in the prestige class cancer mage (Book of Vile Darkness (Oct. 2002) 52-4) should attempt to locate then catch depends a great deal on how the DM reads the cancer mage's level 1 extraordinary ability disease host, which says At 1st level, a cancer mage ...


7

No, standard healing does not do this. A vampire can't exactly catch a disease in the same way that a mortal can. Even if a vampire drinks infected blood they themselves don't become ill. Instead they potentially become carriers for the disease, and could pass it on when feeding due to things like bacteria or viruses being on their fangs which are then ...


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