New answers tagged

0

No, not necessarily I can think of several ways that a patron may not know their warlock. A lot of this is DM dependant and may depend on the setting, so your milage may vary. Prometheus The relationship between your Warlock and their Patron may be akin to the story of Prometheus - the man who stole fire from the gods. However, unlike Prometheus, you are ...


3

You need to do this as part of a feature The spell options on the subclass itself is, as far as I know, only a meta description of the spellcasting capacities. The actual programming of the subclass is done as part of the features. To add spells which are always prepared, make a feature. On any feature, you can add spells and set some options for them. You ...


1

If you haven't already, I'd recommend taking a look at the Unearthed Arcana that discusses feat-building. I'm not a fan of the feats in that particular article myself, but I do appreciate what it has to say on the design philosophy of feats. That said, let's tackle your feat from a different perspective. As mentioned, determining balance just by looking ...


1

In the Descent into Avernus campaign, an NPC can be met as a human and if he dies will show up again in Avernus as an Amnizu. It's suggested to be a direct result of a very plot-important pact he made with an Archduke of Hell. So I'd say the easiest method is to make a pact where one of the components of it is that you become a fiend upon your death.


4

Depends on the patron, depends on the campaign In my campaign, fiends run an entire market in mortal contracts with the result that a warlock’s patron might suddenly change as their pact is bought and sold. However, in this situation, it’s the warlock who doesn’t know who their patron is - the patron does; in the same way Apple or General Electric know who ...


7

Yes, you can The spell has a duration of 1 hour. During this spell's duration, you can use your action to assume a different form Nothing about reverting to your own form says it ends the spell, so it doesn’t. This is different from the Polymorph spell which explicitly says the spell ends when this happens.


8

It Seems Very Strong Compared to Magic Initiate The closest PHB parallel to this feat would seem to be Magic Initiate, which allows knowing one 1st level spell to be cast once without a spell slot (unless you are certain classes and subclasses taking it for your own class). Invocations are somewhat comparable to knowing spells as many of them involve ...


3

It is possible for a patron not to know their warlock As you quote in your question: The Great Old One might be unaware of your existence And, as I assume you are aware based on your use of that quote: Otherworldly Patron At 1st level, you have struck a bargain with an otherworldly being of your choice: the Archfey, the Fiend, or the Great ...


18

The language in the warlock section is filled with "pacts" and "bestowing gifts" and such - all very much implying the patron is not only aware of their warlocks but actively acting upon them. I would submit on this language alone that a patron must be aware they have warlocks. The sections for the most patron types seem to follow this assumption pretty ...


4

At first look, it look slightly unbalanced... Looking at strictly PHB feats, all of the "half feats" (Where it's +1 to an ability score and some other boon) consist of the +1 and one other big boost; mostly proficiency of some kind. With the occasional fluff piece. Examples of the single boost are weapon proficiency added languages added skills added hit ...


0

As noted, this question states that this situation is likely an oversight. I would say that the first line of the spell description covers that oversight. You assume the form of a different creature for the duration. If you revert to your normal form, you are no longer in the form of a different creature. Therefore, the duration of the spell has ended ...


4

Probably just about anything you want Bounded accuracy makes this a lot more feasible than you might expect. Unlike 3.5 where a 20th level character could utterly destroy low-level nothings with general impunity, that's not the case with 5e. First of all, let's do some math to figure out how many stirges could actually attack this creature. I'm making the ...


9

This is not balanced The concern with this is that many characters who wear armor are on the front-line. Their job isn't to be perceptive, their job is to smash and stay alive. Trading away some perception for increased survivability becomes a no-brainer. And anything that's a "definitely yes" decision tree is unlikely to be balanced. Equivalence/...


5

It would not balance out unless donning and doffing the helmet was a full action. In order for the trade to be balanced, the amount of positive should be equal, or near equal, to the negative. In this case, wearing a helmet gives a better armor class (positive) but gives disadvantage to perception checks (negative). But you're also saying that donning the ...


7

The stirges could down a gargantuan creature The average damage a single stirge does follows the pattern of the following table: \begin{array}{c|c|c|c} \text{AC 10} & \text{AC 12} & \text{AC 14} & \text{AC 16} & \text{AC 18} & \text{AC 20} & \text{AC 22} & \text{AC 25+}\\\hline 4.525 & 3.975 & 3.425 & 2.875 &...


2

She is somewhere between 13 and 19 Given the fact that she is described as a teenager, that puts her somewhere between 13 and 19 years old (according to the generally agreed-upon definition of a teenager). Understandably that's confusing when she is referred to as a veteran, but keep in mind: Stat block titles are a convenience, and not necessarily a job ...


5

No, but being invisible would allow you to use stealth when otherwise impossible. A character needs cover or an obstruction to hide from others. In plain sight, nobody can use stealth. Stealth has both visual and aural effects, and you can't hide if you can't provide both. For a parallel, the wood elf's Mask of the Wild trait says: You can attempt to ...


1

Ok this is going to be a bit difficult given how there are no solid rules in such a situation, but we can make a few assumptions. We know stirges are tiny, on a battle map as per regular rules 8 of them could attack a small/medium creature in a single round (Blood Drain does have a 5-foot reach). They do 5 damage on average each attack thus could deal ...


17

It is a very strong trade, combat-wise, as a free object interaction. If you are exploring a dungeon, and have your weapons drawn, and helmet off, you minimize your risk of being surprised and use your object interaction to put the helmet on (assuming your DM lets you do so). If enemies are tricksters that rely on being hidden, you can choose not to put the ...


4

YMMV Ultimately it depends on what kind of game you are playing. If you play a campaign that is essentially a hack 'n' slash meatgrinder where enemies move forward and attack, then having disadvantage on perception is no problem at all--you may never even roll perception the entire dungeon. You can also capitalize on the AC bonus by easily soaking up all ...


8

It will fade over 1 minute. The spell says "The spell ends if you use an action to dismiss it or if the steed takes any damage." and "When the spell ends, the steed gradually fades, giving the rider 1 minute to dismount." No, once the spell ends its effects end to. The fading is an extra effect that lasts 1 minute, this does not extend any other effects. Yes,...


-1

When damage reduces a monster to 0 hp and there is damage remaining that equals or exceeds their max hp, or if they are reduced to 0 hp then fail 3 death saves, the monster dies. The Basic Rules has a section called Dropping to 0 Hit Points which details how this works: When you drop to 0 hit points, you either die outright or fall unconscious, as ...


1

+1 AC for a perception penalty is a fair trade. Investigation is not commonly used, and susceptibility to flanking would add a whole new system. The exhaustion ticking is too easy to counter and difficult to track. However, perception is extremely important both in and out of combat. Being forced to take a penalty on perception would mean that donning a ...


5

Juiblex lives One of the core guiding principals in 5e is that the specific overrules the general: This book contains rules, especially in parts 2 and 3, that govern how the game plays. That said, many racial traits, class features, spells, magic items, monster abilities, and other game elements break the general rules in some way, creating an exception ...


-2

While PC's get to decide on the composition of their group, any DM knows that after a campaign has been played more than about four sessions and one player has never played it, there are going to be problems that will severely interfere with the DM's carefully crafted campaign narrative, as well as other difficulties for the DM, if that absent player ...


5

The two benefits of the Channel Divinity are entirely separate Another feature with similar wording is the Barbarian's 7th level feature, Feral Instinct: [...] you have advantage on initiative rolls. Additionally, if you are surprised at the beginning of combat and aren't incapacitated, you can act normally on your first turn, but only if you enter ...


12

The DM narrates the result of the character's actions (PHB p.6) The specific beats general rule doesn't help here because you have one specific rule saying he dies and one equally specific rule saying he doesn't. So we have to fall back on this rule: Then the DM determines the results of the adventurers’ actions and narrates what they experience. Because ...


-1

Juiblex lives to ooze again. Normally, the Nightwalker's attack dropping someone to 0 HP would kill them instantly. However, Juiblex doesn't die because Juiblex can only die at the start of his own turn. Then at the start of his turn, he regenerates and doesn't die. Why does Juiblex's protection override the Nightwalker's instant-death effect? For the ...


4

No. Dispel Magic has the following primary effect (from the 5e SRD): Choose one creature, object, or magical effect within range. Any spell of 3rd level or lower on the target ends. Since Dispel Magic only ends spells, and the lethargy from Haste only occurs after the spell has ended, then Dispel Magic would not have any effect on it. It's arguable ...


0

Yes The answer hinges on whether or not magical items that use the "gain the "enlarge" effect of [spell]" are considered as having applied the spell. Sage Advice says it Dispel Magic only works on spells The 2019 Sage Advice compendium (page 14) states the following: Can you use dispel magic to dispel a magical effect like a vampire’s Charm ability or ...


5

Yes According to Jeremy Crawford (unofficially via twitter) Dispel magic can be used against a spell effect created by a potion, but a potion can't be robbed of its magic by it. Also, the accepted answer to the question you link states the same thing. This means that, though the potion itself cannot be dispelled of its magical properties, someone who ...


3

No. The relevant text of Detect Magic is For the duration, you sense the presence of magic within 30 feet of you. If you sense magic in this way, you can use your action to see a faint aura around any visible creature or object in the area that bears magic, and you learn its school of magic, if any. (DnDBeyond entry for Detect Magic) Perceiving specific ...


27

If anything, you would see a divination aura around your own body. To the extent that Detect Magic has a target, the target is you, the caster. The 30-foot sphere is not the target, but simply the range of the special sense granted to the caster by the spell. (By analogy, consider what Detect Magic would see for a Darkvision spell.) So, if you held your ...


15

"I cast detect magic in a circle around myself." Except you don't. Detect magic doesn't have a range with a distance, you don't make a spell attack roll to cast it. It isn't an area of effect spell either. You cast it only on yourself, gaining a specialized sense. You'd be able to see the aura around yourself caused by detect magic, and an aura around any ...


5

It is still possible to hide from them Starting with the wording of Ghostly Gaze: As an action, you gain the ability to see through solid objects to a range of 30 feet. Within that range, you have darkvision if you don’t already have it. This special sight lasts for 1 minute or until your concentration ends (as if you were concentrating on a spell). ...


3

No, there is a null result Detect Magic (PHB, 231) works as follows: For the duration, you sense the presence of magic within 30 feet of you. If you sense magic in this way, you can use your action to see a faint aura around any visible creature or object in the area that bears magic, and you learn its school of magic, if any. The spell can ...


8

You would not feel the presence of the field This answer stated the opposite before, but upon further reading of the Anti-magic field spell I realized it was wrong. As per Detect Magic's description: For the duration you sense the presence of magic within 30 ft of you. If you sense magic in this way, [...], and you learn its school of magic if any. ...


2

Executive Summary Like Dispel Magic, Detect Magic should "have no effect on the [Antimagic Field] sphere" meaning that you will not detect a faint aura from the sphere itself. Relevant Quotes Detect Magic allows the caster to: [S]ee a faint aura around any visible creature or object in the area that bears magic... Antimagic Field says: Spells and ...


7

No, but it gives disadvantage on Perception checks to find the invisible person Very closely related: Is a Perception check against an invisible target made with disadvantage?. See my answer there. Short version: Being invisible is equivalent to being heavily obscured, and being lightly obscured imposes disadvantage on (most) Perception checks, so being ...


5

They are Blinded Unless the feature offers a specific exception, or there's a general rule, things do what they say they do. No exception is given in the description of Radiant Weapon to creatures that are hidden or ranged attackers either specifically or generally that would prevent them from being blinded by this effect, so it would apply to them as well. ...


4

The book Eberron: Rising from the Last War includes the prosthetic limb magic item (page 278): This artificial limb replaces a hand, arm, foot, leg, or similar appendage that was lost or removed. While the prosthetic is attached and attuned to you, it functions identically to the body part it is replacing. You can detach or reattach it as an action, and ...


4

It is a two-step process. Humanoids slain by having their max HP reduced to 0 by a vampire's bite attack and then buried become vampire spawn. Vampire spawn can then be transformed into true vampires by being fed the blood of a true vampire. The Vampire (MM, 352) entry in the Monster Manual says the following: Born from Death. Most of a vampire's ...


19

If a vampire simply feeds on you (as in drinks some of your blood), you do not turn into a vampire. If a vampire kills you with its Bite attack (MM, 352): The target's hit point maximum is reduced by an amount equal to the necrotic damage taken, and the vampire regains hit points equal to that amount. The reduction lasts until the target finishes a long ...


1

The text in the monster manual regarding this that you quote above A character who becomes a lycanthrope retains his or her statistics except as specified by lycanthrope type (Emphasis Mine) This only refers to the humanoid becoming a lycanthrope, not reverting from a lycanthrope to a humanoid again. Because of this, this of course means that anything ...


0

This is a poorly worded effect, but according to this tweet from Jeremy Crawford, Eldritch Cannon does let you spend a spell slot to create the cannon. That slot must be spent specifically on the cannon, not on something else. So, according to this, the intended use of this ability is that when you make the second cannon, it counts as building a new one, ...


3

No The ability scores gained are not permanent. Once you cease to be a werewolf, you no longer benefit from the STR gain. This is like having a trait or feature removed from you, so you lose whatever effects you gain from it. It's like if for whatever reason, you lose the Ability Score Increase gained from your class, you also lose the ability score gained ...


12

This effect is not magical at this point, just, as the dictionary definition puts it, a lack of energy and enthusiasm. So, since this is merely an exhaustion equivalent, dispel magic and antimagic field can not get rid of this effect, and if used during the spell's duration would simply end the spell and cause the exhaustion to happen sooner. However, ...


16

An anti magic field does prevent the Dragon's Breath spell from affecting targets in an anti-magic field. In the spell's description, it says You touch one willing creature and imbue it with the power to spew magical energy from its mouth... (Emphasis Mine) This shows that this effect is intended to be magical, and therefore does not work in an ...


1

Changelings are considered "shapechangers", so they're unaffected by polymorph The description of the polymorph spell says (emphasis mine): The spell has no effect on a shapechanger or a creature with 0 hit points. As you note, the changeling race has a trait that allows them to change their appearance, but it has gone through a few iterations before ...


18

NathanS covers this answer very well, and is absolutely correct. While invisibility doesn't give advantage on Stealth checks, you cannot even attempt to Hide if you're being seen; invisibility allows you to do so at any moment. That being said, I want to address your quote on The DM can also decide that circumstances influence a roll in one direction or ...


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