21

You're in luck, because the power levels of the old Basic D&D games are similar to those of 5e.* I'm going to illustrate my answer with examples from B5 Horror on the Hill, but you can apply the principles to any of your Basic D&D Modules. 1. Replace what monsters and NPCs you can from the 5e Monster Manual This will save you a lot of work, and ...


16

In the adventure of escape from Zanzer's dungeon, you meet an NPC named Axel, and get introduced to his "funny dice". Basically, it consists of Axel trying to cheat you by asking you to roll higher when he has a larger die, or to roll lower, when he uses 2d6 and you use a 1d12. The game worked as follows: The first to 100 points wins (in this case you ...


14

BX doesn't put the same weight on the ability scores as you appear to, so beware that adding an ability score advancement mechanic will redirect some of your players motivations away from looking for harder-to-achieve bonuses to their effectiveness. On the other hand, you don't have to worry much about breaking the balance of the game with this, because ...


10

Full damage = what's rolled on the dice. As written, the damage done to a non avoiding enemy is the full amount rolled, which isn't the same as "max damage" which could be inferred to mean "max possible score" on each die rolled. The saving throw for this attack is a "save or suck" type save, so there's no half damage on offer. A victim may choose to ...


9

I did some quick research: B4 - The Lost City. Was this it? It was published in '82. The lower tiers were to be a series of chambers showing the journey of the spirit after death. Each room was to have a painting of another stage in the journey. The final tier, where Zargon now lives, was to have a painting of the Cynidicean paradise. The painting was ...


6

It's possible it may have had some influence, but it's very unlikely to be a direct inspiration. To respond in order, while there are five colored rooms, only the red room really corresponds in any way with its flavor in Alpha. The Red Room is indeed fire-themed, but the Blue Room is empty, the White Room is ice-themed (while blue is the ice color in Alpha),...


5

Converting from BECMI movement stats to D&D 5e Speed stats starts with looking at what the numbers in each are like, and then making sure they're converted in a way that recognises that playability is the goal rather than something mathematically pure (though if we can have both, great). A comparison of movement rates in BECMI and D&D 5e If you ...


5

This rule seems to originate in Basic/Expert/Companion/Master/Immortals D&D. It's on p170 of the D&D Rules Cyclopedia, with exactly this phrasing, and the table on p169 makes it clear that Crush damage is the same as Bite damage. AD&D1e didn't have anything like this. The context makes it clear that if you fail the saving throw, or chose to ...


4

There are none, but it's possible that you don't actually need to increase scores. As far back as his proto-D&D Blackmoor campaign, Dave Arneson used a method where he would roll from two to five d6 (depending on the difficulty of the task) and roll under some relevant characteristic, plus 1 point for every two character levels. So if you were a 10th-...


4

I ran a couple of immortal level games back in the day. I relied heavily on the setting for narrative (I played in Mystara) and the players were generally against the clock on some-unknown-thing-from-elsewhere threatening to destroy the multiverse investigating which immortal was breaking the rules to destroy some mortal country or institution tying up ...


4

Age (and height and weight) weren't determined mechanically in any edition until AD&D, and even in AD&D it was only a suggested system rather than the default. Once AD&D introduced the idea, it was (as far as I know) never incorporated into the Basic D&D line.


3

In addition to all of the above plus the simple 1 per 4 levels of the d20 OGL you might look at a game called Chronicles of Ramalar. It had a system called Demeanor and Theme which each character had four circles with 12 dots around them. A goal was written in each circle and every time the character did something to advance to that goal a dot was colored ...


3

Ah hah! On a whim, I wandered through the becmi contents over at DriveThruRPG, and my heart leapt when I saw a piece of art. It's called "The Haunted Tower", and I now possess a PDF version. Let the nostalgia commence. Thanks for the help!


2

No, they have the same canon but many inconsistency (even inside the same edition). The 1000-1010DC is a very full decade and Karameikos become a Kingdom in 1006 DC (see Karameikos - Kingdom of Adventure pg 21. Before was already indipendent but was named Grand Duchy to count on political support see GAZ1 pg13). Alphatia sinks in 1009 DC. Read Wrath of ...


2

Often, groups I've played with used the "whenever the DM feels like it" house rule. Frequently this was done in conjunction with one of several guidelines: As part of a finished quest: This could be a major milestone for the party as a whole (much like an XP reward) or when a character completes a specific, personal undertaking. Such a personal quest may ...


1

Let's start with a baseline human PC. In 5e, a Human has a base walking speed of 30 feet per round (6 seconds in 5e), which corresponds to a brisk walking pace (5.5 km/h or 3.4 mph) in real life. According to the Rules Cyclopedia chapter 6, BECMI PCs (who are human by default, unless they pick dwarf, elf or halfling as their character class) have a ...


1

The Simple Answer: From level 2-10: Every even level: +1 to ability of player's choice. From level 11-30: Every 4th level (i.e. 16, 20, 24, 28) Given that you're avoiding magical-items, it might be advisable to have some extra ability bumps. Although I'm not familiar with 'Basic Fantasy', it might be best to increase monster-stats slightly to maintain the ...


1

"Classic" isn't a term until 1994: https://www.acaeum.com/ddindexes/setpages/basic.html I would define OD&D as D&D before the Basic & Advanced split where later Basic also is part of Basic & Expert, and Basic-Expert-Companion-Masters-Immortals, then the RC (levels 1-36) and big black box and CD&D (levels 1-5), "Original" as a term was ...


1

First there was the Basic Set, also known as the Holmes Rules, from its author. It was intended to be an introductory set of rules, based on what we now call Original D&D, leading players either to D&D proper (OD&D) or AD&D. Following that, the B/X rules were released. This consisted of the Basic Set and the Expert Set, also known as Moldvay/...


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