Hot answers tagged

60

There's a third option - and it's potentially much better The other answers have dealt capably with your 1 vs. 2 scenario already. To recap what's been established elsewhere: Dodge every round - every attack against you has disadvantage Dash every round - suffer half as many attacks against you Which is better? It depends on the enemy's likelihood 'to hit'...


59

1. Yes Of course it is; we are playing a tabletop role-playing game and the players can only make intelligent choices if the meta-constructs of the mechanics have some perceptible in-world difference from one another. To think otherwise makes the game impossible to play. 2. No Of course it isn't; we are playing a tabletop role-playing game and the ...


44

In D&D 5E, a player cannot roll to actively dodge an attack. This happens in such systems as Warhammer Fantasy, Dark Heresy and potentially a lot of other RPG systems. But not D&D 5E. In D&D 5E the dodge action can only be taken on your own turn as per page 192 of the Player's Handbook described under the (aptly named) Dodge action: When you ...


43

Depends on the probability of your enemies hitting you with an attack. If you Dodge, the damage you take, on average, is given by the probability p of hitting you (squared because of disadvantage) multiplied by the average damage d they deal times 10 rounds times the amount of attackers a: $$\text{AvgDamage}_{\text{Dodge}} = p^2 \times d \times 10 \times a.$...


35

A Prone Creature can Dodge Nothing in the rules specifies that a creature cannot take the Dodge action while under the effects of the Prone condition. The Prone condition (PHB, p. 292) states: A prone creature's only movement is to crawl, unless it stands up and thereby ends the condition. The creature has disadvantage on attack rolls. An attack ...


17

You can Dodge when Prone The rules for the Dodge action simply state: When you take the Dodge action, you focus entirely on avoiding attacks. Until the start of your next turn, any attack roll made against you has disadvantage if you can see the attacker, and you make Dexterity saving throws with advantage. You lose this benefit if you are incapacitated ...


14

No The D&D combat system assumes that you are running around, jumping pit traps, casting spells, and hitting people all while trying not to be hit yourself. The Dexterity component to AC already includes normal attempts at not being hit by expedient of being somewhere else. From PHB page 14: Your Armor Class (AC) represents how well your character ...


13

If the attacks are likely to hit you, it's better to Dash. The chance of a single attack roll hitting is \$x\$. The chance of getting hit with disadvantage on the roll is \$x^2\$. If you take 2 attacks with disadvantage, the expected number of hits you'll take is \$2x^2\$. So Dashing is better than Dodging when \$2x^2 > x\$, or \$x > \frac{1}{2}\$. ...


10

The character did dodge. The HP loss reflects this. The Basic Rules defines Hit Points like this, on page 77: Hit points represent a combination of physical and mental durability, the will to live, and luck. Creatures with more hit points are more difficult to kill. Those with fewer hit points are more fragile. It expands on this with an aside at ...


9

Sometimes. Narrate it. I disagree with some other answers saying that focusing on avoiding attacks is not perceptibly different than, say, readying an action to hit someone with a hammer. Those actions are likely to look very different. How the Dodge action looks depends on the characteristics of the NPC and the situation: The orc lowers into an athletic ...


8

Pathfinder abstracts much of what we imagine combat involves While it may seem to the player that when it's not his character's turn that his PC's doing nothing, that's an abstraction that Pathfinder makes for the sake of simultaneity. A round is 6 seconds, and during those six seconds typically everyone involved in the encounter gets a turn. When it's not ...


5

Dodge is both a passive part of your AC as well as a standard action (with a 3rd party feat for a reactive version). You are right, your dodge bonus is added to your AC, which can come from various sources including the feat 'Dodge' You can also take the 'Total Defense' standard action: You can defend yourself as a standard action. You get a +4 dodge ...


5

Yes The character can take the Dodge action because Dodge is one of the listed actions all creatures can take. The mount can take the Dodge action because a) if it is controlled, Dodge is one of the permitted actions and b) if it is independent, Dodge is one of the actions all creatures can take.


4

There is no Dodge action in the game world When a character "focuses entirely on avoiding attacks", we simulate this via the Dodge action. Actions and turns are the part of the mechanics, they are subject of players' discretion. The Dodge action is not a spell, that magically hinders enemies when they are trying to attack you. Its is a part of the game ...


3

You can dodge by Readying an Action to move out of reach from your enemy's attack using the Acrobatics skill. This requires that the character actually spend his Standard Action and not do much for that round until the triggering situation happens. It could even not happen and he lost his standard action for that round. Ready The ready action lets ...


2

The dodge action is defined as: When you take the Dodge action, you focus entirely on avoiding attacks. Until the start of your next turn, any Attack roll made against you has disadvantage if you can see the attacker, and you make Dexterity Saving Throws with advantage. You lose this benefit if you are Incapacitated (as explained in ...


2

No, it doesn't. Dodge is not a valid specialization for gymnastics (page 133): Specializations: Balance, Climbing, Dance, Leaping, Parkour, Rolling Parrying on the other hand, since it uses a specific weapon from a group of weapons, uses the specialization bonus from the armed skill being used (blades, clubs, etc). Blocking is similar, but that is ...


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