New answers tagged

-1

I know I'm a little late to the party here (18 months since OP) but I was searching for this answer also. Carcer pointed to directions in the DMG, and following them I built a formula that calculates a creature's CR (More or less. It's not an exact science) from their AC, HP, Attack Bonus, Damage per Round, and whether they have significant resistances. I ...


3

It's up to the DM Unfortunately, your answer is predicated on picking a wyrmring and having it age appropriately. Neither of which are fully supported by the rules. While you can True Polymorph (PHB, 283) into a new form that: ... can be any kind you choose whose challenge rating is equal to or less than the target's... It doesn't actually state that you ...


5

This is entirely up to the DM. No rules are covering such transformation. Indeed how long they have to spend in the shadow or even how much of their original personality survives such a transformation is entirely up to the DM. As a DM I would be fine with it because the time involved takes it well out of the scope of a normal game, and weird stuff happens in ...


11

The feature is ambiguous. You should ask your DM. The Draconic Ancestry feature (PHB, 102) states At 1st level, you choose one type of dragon as your ancestor. The damage type associated with each dragon is used by features you gain later. A table is then included that lists the chromatic and metallic dragon types from the monster manual. Notably the text ...


6

RAW: You can only select one of the listed options. Mechanically the problem of selecting some unknown dragon should be evident in the fact your class features wouldn't have a table to refer to for Elemental Affinity. You can always ask your DM for leniency or adjustments for the subclass though.


3

Consider using optional DMG actions In the Dungeon Master's Guide there is a section for extra action options one could include in a game and one of them is Climb onto a bigger creature (DMG p. 271) (emphasis mine). As an alternative, a suitably large opponent can be treated as terrain for the purpose of jumping onto its back or clinging to a limb. This is ...


2

This is Improvising an Action, so the DM decides But a Strength (Athletics) contest is most appropriate, although probably only as an action on subsequent turns The first half of the plan, where the dragon grapples, lifts and drops characters from a height, is a valid tactic, covered by NautArch's answer and this question. Using solely the rules as written, ...


0

The dragon action of picking up and dropping is a very cool one, but it isn't necessarily the best move always for the dragon. If you'd like to play the dragon like this so it's 'easier', it's all good! So, let's start with the mechanics. For general purpose information, you can see the grappling rules which cover most of what I say below. The Grapple To ...


-2

Assuming the player is holding on, there are at least two possible actions that the dragon can take on the following turn to break free from the player's grasp: Shove action (a reasonable interpretation of the shove action in this case is that the player would not be holding on anymore after a successful shove and would fall from the height) Using the ...


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