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14

Spell selection Some of the best cleric spells don't require an attack roll or saving throw. I played a Tempest cleric from level 1-20 with an "optimal" progression (20 Wis by level 8) and still used most of these. I'll divide the spells into proactive and reactive. Proactive spells are what you cast when no one's injured or debilitated. Reactive ...


13

You're already competitive. One of the things 5e introduced to D&D was the concept of "bounded accuracy", meaning it's just not really possible for a player to min-max their way into being vastly better than anyone else. You could of course badly nerf yourself (say, if you put 8 in your Dexterity and then insist on playing an archer), but with ...


16

Focus on what you DO have. Using standard array and without Tasha's reassignment rules (or a house-rule equivalent), there's not an easy way to "stay competitive" with other characters who are built to maximize the utility of their ability score bonuses...so let's maximize the utility of the bonuses you do have. You could lean into the advantage ...


34

You can't, and it's not that bad. As you've noted, you aren't playing to optimize while others are. But in the end, that difference is going to be minimal. They will start with a higher modifier by about 1 - which really isn't much of a difference. Your die rolls will much more heavily influence the outcome, minimizing that mechanical issue. We roll stats at ...


10

Play a half-drow cleric instead. While a drow cleric is (and always will be) suboptimal without using the rules in Tasha's Cauldron of Everything to move a stat bonus into Wisdom, there is a potential solution that would allow you to play a male cleric of a drow god: play a half-elf with a drow parent. (Sword Coast Adventurers Guide). Half-elves, after all, ...


14

You cannot. Mechanically, the choice of the drow race for this cleric will always be purely a downside. There is nothing prior to Tasha’s that makes it anything else. And that is why Tasha’s was written in the first place, so that you could play a drow cleric without it being a strict negative for you, mechanically. Of course, no one needed Tasha’s to fix ...


19

The Underdark originated in Greyhawk, not the Forgotten Realms The modules D1 and D2 which followed the original three Giants modules, came out in 1978 and were the introduction of the Underdark via module (and given that the author was E. Gary Gygax, it was set in Greyhawk). It's where the drow originate (in terms of game play; the first ever encounter ...


22

Greyhawk: Descent into the Depths of the Earth The Underdark concept originated in Greyhawk with the in the AD&D adventure module Descent into the Depths of the Earth, published first as two different modules in 1978, and republished in a compilation module in 1981. See Korvin's answer for more details about this one. Exandria Matthew Mercer's world ...


6

Yes, other worlds often have subterranean regions, and drow often live in them. They are even, often, called the Underdark. For instance, the world of Oerth, for the Greyhawk setting, had its own Underdark (though also called Underoerth or Deep Oerth). Other worlds can do different things, though—Eberron’s subterranean region is called Khyber, and drow don’t ...


0

The racial feature rule states: disadvantage to attack rolls and Perception checks whenever you, your target, or what you're trying to perceive are in direct sunlight One way to change the impact of this as a DM would be to vary how strictly you define and rule what "direct sunlight" means. Is full cloud cover direct sunlight for instance? If you ...


6

Wear a knave's eye patch. There is a rare magic item in Waterdeep: Dragon Heist that mitigates light sensitivity called the knave's eye patch. Its second benefit states: If you have the Sunlight Sensitivity trait, you are unaffected by the trait.


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