New answers tagged

-6

They can't be No Civilization In Real Life has magic. All FR Nations and Civilizations include magic. Take a good hard look at your assumptions. Arthur C Clarke had a nice quote for cases like this. Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. FR isn't based on advanced technology, it's based on magic. Real world civilizations ...


19

It's your story, it doesn't matter After seeing your comment that this question is directed towards developing your own storyline, I realized that you are looking for existing stories to provide confirmation that your idea is viable. But you don't need to! This is your story that you're writing. Just go ahead and write it. It doesn't have to have similar ...


17

It really is going to depend on the setting, and what you as DM want to do with it. As far as official settings go, Eberron comes to mind: From Eberron: Rising From the Last War, page 193, under "Dragons": The dragons of Eberron aren't restricted in alignment — good red dragons and evil gold dragons are equally common. Most dragons tend toward ...


-4

Well, depending on how far out in the lore your allowed to branch, in 3.x there was a dragon lance book, so if the dragon lance novels are allowed to be considered, than there was a short story. It was years ago and I do not know which book it was in. From what I remember a chromatic dragon never felt like who they should be and after some even where they ...


1

It is likely that they can use it elsewhere, subject to DM's approval! The 2e version of defiling and preserving is mechanically complex and hence during the 3e period, WotC's official Dragon magazine provided updated defiling rules in the issue 315, published in January 2004. On page 35, we read: You can easily use the defiler magic system in a game that ...


3

They can only use Defiler Magic on Athas, however... They could still possibly use magic, but it will be from an alternate source, as they will find themselves unable to harness the same energy from the environment as they did on their homeworld. It's possible they might need to 'attune' themselves to the way magic functions in their host realm, and relearn ...


4

1978, possibly 1975 My own research into the two oldest modules I own (both AD&D modules published by TSR in 1978) revealed two cases of variant monsters under the revised definition. Since Tomb of Horrors was first designed and played at the 1975 Origins Convention, it is possible that it was published in a limited run that year. I know there were ...


3

The other answers excellently address the potential cost of ordinary clockwork, but I have an alternate proposal: In 5th edition, a magical pocket watch may be cheaper than the mundane variety... if you can get one. Xanathar's Guide to Everything introduces a Common magic item, the "Clockwork Amulet", which is described as containing "tiny ...


11

1976 The earliest published standalone adventure for Dungeons & Dragons was Palace of the Vampire Queen. That adventure has several variant monsters. In particular, the Dwarf Children all have 1 hp (technically 1 'Max. Damage') (excepting the Princess, but she is labeled 'dwarf princess', not 'dwarf children'), and none of them have levels in fighter, ...


1

Chwinga are based on the Mmoatia, who are forest fairies of Medieval Ghana and Ashanti mythology. Mmoatia (singular, Aboatia), are said to be forest dwellers of Ghana. A subclass of Abosom (intermediary spirits, or the enlightened dead). They are believed to be very short in stature, standing not more than one foot high. They have curved noses and yellowish ...


10

During the 2e era, there was a sourcebook titled Aurora's Whole Realms Catalogue. This is a very interesting accessory as it is essentially an in-world catalog of mostly nonmagical items that could be found in a certain buy-through-mail store in the Forgotten Realms. In that book, we have (pages 43, 99, 147): Hour/Minute Glass: ... various sizes of time ...


5

Well, the only official item I know of that has a listed price and is also some sort of intricate internal mechanical stuff would be the Gold Music Box Found on page 135 of the DMG for 5e. this item is a treasure so it unfortunately doesn't have a listed weight, but we do know the price which is a hefty 2,500gp. The price for gold as a trade good in 5e is ...


21

The AD&D 2nd Edition Monstrous Manual gives more examples of oozes, from which we can draw some inferences. Oozes, slimes, and jellies are listed together (pg. 276-280.) Puddings have their own separate listing (pg. 297.) Slimes are largely immobile and plantlike As in 5th edition, green slime is a dungeon hazard, but here it appears with the more ...


2

There are some fantastic answers here that address your first point but I will just add my thoughts You say he is playing the character poorly, I will ask is he, or has he got something in his characters backstory that leads to this approach to combat. I had a player who played a similar way with his rogue, but, he had a clear understandable backstory that ...


-5

Reroll the game Intro One day the party came to city and suddently is encircled by many armed guards. They does not look unfriendly, just carefully doing their work. There is imposant man between them, in impressive armor and he address the party: "Worry not my friends. As you may know, I am the baron and ruler of this land and my dauther is medium. ...


42

Give 'em enough rope, lose the safety net This character is being enabled to fail by the DM, you, even with the best of intentions. You'd like for the player to enjoy a character concept that he's come up with. The problem is that his play style is suicidal, and as you note (1) his PC dies frequently, and (2) the rest of the players "get" team ...


24

Ask him what he wants Bardic Wizard has a pretty good answer, but I want to zoom out a bit: something about this situation doesn't seem right. By that I don't mean that it's not ideal (if it were, you wouldn't be asking), but rather, I'm having trouble reconciling your description of a player who 1) doesn't care about roleplaying and only cares about stats; ...


28

In short: Talk to him and work to find a build and a play style that works for both of you. It may also be symptomatic of a larger issue. I think you have three issues here. One, the constant death. The second is that the way the player wants to play in combat (henceforth the play style) and the mechanics of the character (the build) don’t match up, and that ...


1

You have a misconception an average peasant or a 1st-level fighter who drinks a healing potion will instantly heal from all their injuries and be brought back to full fighting strength. because they are not necessarily be healed up from their injuries. When they receive the HP healing, they regain 3.5e the ability to take physical punishment and keep ...


4

There is no official in-universe explanation for why more powerful adventurers require stronger magic to heal the same fraction of their total hit points. It is not explained because it cannot be explained - it simply makes no sense in the fiction. The reason why stronger magic is required to heal stronger characters is purely a game design decision: if the ...


2

Most adventures had either implied or explicit win conditions. While there is not an explicit "win condition" for the game per se in the earliest version of the game, most published adventures had either explicit or at least implied win conditions. As an example, in L1 The Assassin's Knot, locating and killing/capturing the murderer of Baron ...


0

Gangbusters I won't repeat what others have said about D&D being a bad fit for your needs. I can offer another alternative game... Back in the 1980s, TSR produced an RPG set in 1920s/30s (Prohibition era) America called Gangbusters. The rules allowed for you being a private detective, a police officer, a Federal agent, or a criminal. This system was ...


Top 50 recent answers are included