New answers tagged

0

Far Realm was initially created for the AD&D 2e module The Gates of Firestorm Peak. So there used to be a gate as implied by the name of the module. However, the 3e Manual of Planes states: There are no known portals to the Far Realm, or at least none that are still viable. Ancient elves once pierced the boundary of eons with a vast portal to the Far ...


2

The relevant book is the 3.x sourcebook The Grand History of the Realms, but unfortunately it doesn't go into much detail on the how, merely that it happened and when. Their original enslavement comes from the Grand History on page 19: –8100 DR to –8080 DR The Mindstalker Wars: The illithids of Oryndoll attack the eastern subkingdoms of Shanatar, ...


4

The Rrakkma adventure module includes a portal to the Far Realm This adventure module for Adventurer's League includes a portal to the Far Realm, although it's up to you how "canon" you consider this. In "Area 11. The Cathedral" of "Section 2. Temple of Madness", which is on the plane of Pandemonium: Section 3 is then set in the Far Realm, although it's ...


38

It changes between Editions But the standard idea of "Opposed Schools of Magic" only exists in 2E. Let's walk through them... First Edition In 1E, there were no restrictions on schools of magic. There was a sub-type of "Magic User" called an "Illusionist" that had access to a slightly different battery of spells, but beyond that the idea of specialization ...


4

AD&D 2e, where this started1: eight schools and opposition schools While there are technically nine schools of magic in AD&D 2e, it boils down to the eight that we have in 5e since Lesser Divination is / was usable by all wizards with no restrictions. (Read Magic, Detect Magic, etc). (PHB, AD&D 2e, Magic, and The Complete Wizard's Handbook). ...


4

Fixed opposition schools only existed in 2e; prior to that, there was no school specialization, 3e had the specialist choose their opposition school(s), and 4e and 5e simply give unique class features to specialists. Per this forum post, even in 2e, schools didn’t necessarily have precisely one opposition. The schools were arranged in a ring, so directly ...


3

Death of Lashimire This was a psionics based adventure published in Dungeon Magazine issue 116, with the description of: The infamous psion Lashimire is dead, leaving an undefended fortress ripe for looting. But the PC's soon discover that they aren't the only ones after Lashimire's treasure when they begin to encounter bands of githyanki in search of a ...


12

Kobolds do lay eggs, which mature for 2-3 months before hatching Volo's Guide to Monsters features an entire Monster Lore section about kobolds, including a brief examination of their biological life-cycle. Of their birth and ageing, it says that: Kobolds grow and mature much more swiftly than members of other humanoid races. At 6 years old a kobold is ...


12

Unlike half-elves, half-orcs don’t generally live apart from their parent races so much, so it would be somewhat surprising for them to focus so strongly on the distinction. Most half-orcs are from the Shadow Marches, which is a pretty well-mixed population of human, orc, and half-orc—and considering the mixing, it’s quite likely that even those who are ...


6

The answer by Karan Shishoo is probably more in line with what you have asked for, but since you asked for generic lore, let me add the following: There is an entire 2e campaign setting called the Council of Wryms, initially published as a boxed set and later as a hardcover book. The setting is located in its own crystal sphere, and the main location is a ...


1

As an alternative to all the conflict-resolution advice being given, how would you feel if, the next time, it was a different player being robbed by their "teammates"? What would happen if, in the next session, you propose to 3 players that you gang up and rob the 4th? If this kind of thing happens in almost every session, it would lead to a very different ...


6

While not from 5e, the 2000-2002 Dragonlance novel trilogy The War of Souls contains an instance of 'friendliness' between Mirror (Solomirathnius), a silver dragon and Razor, a blue dragon. They work together for a while since they have common goals and do not attempt to outright kill each other.


2

Is your character in the right party? One of the questions I would ask the OP is: how out of alignment is the OP's character compared to the rest of the party? If OP is playing a Good Ranger, and everyone else is playing as Neutral or Evil, the party make up is ... hinky. (And maybe a sign that the expectations are out of alignment, too.) Are you in the ...


2

To me it depends. The feeling of playing alone against all others is not a very fun experience. And if this happens more than once, I agree with the other answers. You should talk to them about it or find a different group. I will not go deeper into this point there are enough answers about this. However if this is the only instance where this happened, ...


3

I will try to provide a somewhat subjective answer from 2e. The outsiders (as they got to be collectively called later in 3e) are beings that are the embodiments of their respective planes and everything in the Outer Planes is about belief. As such, the way we played 2e, we used to assume that the destruction of an outsider's material form should not be ...


3

You could roleplay your character. Start with honestly not knowing who robbed you, trying to figure out, telling your comrades about it and seeing what their reactions are. If they manage to keep your PC in the dark that they robbed him, roleplay your PCs limited knowledge until he figures it out. The longer that goes on, the more those with a waking ...


1

First, I think talking this out with them is the best way. But if you don't want to, here is an alternative: Accept what happened but play it out such that they feel ashamed in the end and recognize that this was a bad move, maybe even apologize in character. For example, I would ask, that before going on the main quest, you really first need to find your ...


-7

It is just a game - you need to relax, and enjoy. There is no need to lose friends over this small incident. Once I played Star Wars, as a Jedi. My friend played a wookie. After some quarrel, he said that he hit me in a face. He made maximum high hit, and my Jedi fumbled, and died. The DM killed the party very shortly - they couldn't handle the challenge ...


17

This situation Emphasize the need for a session 0. A session were no one plays but everyone explains their expectations from the game. At the end of session 0 you should all agree on what is allowed or not in your game. What happened to you is a major point and should have been answered at this session 0. Example of questions I like to ask in session 0: ...


0

An eye for an eye! ...aye?! The previous answers are great and I think all their votes are well-deserved. As an alternative though, I might propose this... If you still want to play in that group, you could think of turning what has been happening into something fun and fantastic (with the help of your DM). Since you are a one-eyed Ranger, ask your DM to ...


45

Communicate and then find a better group or activity. tl;dr You can communicate how you feel and what you would like in a non-accusatory way, but it sounds like it's best to plan to leave that group. State what bothers you using I statements. Use a variation of the structure "When X happened, I felt Y". Avoid the word "you" or calling anyone else out. ...


124

Short answer: stop playing with people who abuse you What could I do if most people are just going to keep on stealing what I earn and making the game not fun to play? You are being picked on. Sometimes, when something bad happens to us, we go into denial. We don't want to believe that bad things are happening to us. We don't want to believe that ...


-1

No The general rule is that creatures die when they reach 0hp; PCs being an exception. The Monster Manual (p. 6) says: Certain spells, magic items, class features, and other effects in the game interact in special ways with creatures of a particular type. ... The game includes the following monster types, which have no rules of their own. ...


19

It was retconned during D&D 3rd edition. D&D 5e's Volo's Guide to Monsters, p. 120, states: Purebloods mature at the same rate as humans and have lifespans similar in length to theirs. This was already the case in D&D 3rd edition. Races of Faerûn (2003), p. 151, specifies: On average, yuan-ti live to be about 80 years old, although ...


5

Yes; it's different in 5e The yuan-ti first appeared in Dwellers of the Forbidden City which didn't mention their lifespans. However, they were given a comprehensive "Ecology of ..." article in Dragon #151 which says: Pureblood yuan-ti age as do gray elves (AD&D 1st Edition Dungeon Masters Guide, page 13). Halfbreeds live twice as long as purebloods, ...


23

Celestial, Mortal Variant You can find the full planescape mailing list archive at archive.org. In it, there is an email from author Galen, dated 16 Nov 1999. It goes: It is proposed that the Eladrin and the Guardinals are subgroupings of a single race, herein termed CMVs. The next day, author Doug Meerschaert comments: CMV? Wow... an acronym that ...


12

Other than the well-known drow, some races which are predominantly matriarchal include: Beholders (I, Tyrant; worship a female deity and are led by "hive mothers", though according to Lords of Madness beholders are gender neutral, though they do lay eggs) Bhuka (Sandstorm, p.40) Blackspawn raiders (Monster Manual IV, p.132) Dune reapers (Dark Sun Creature ...


1

From 3.5 or earlier, as I do not deal with 5, Abeils are a bee-like monstrous humanoid race with a Queen leader (MMII). Giant Ants (MM3.5) have a Queen leader. Hags and possibly nagas (MM3.5) seem to be solely female. Stheins (Bastards&Bloodlines) are exclusively female. Amazons (I do not remember the name of the Slayer’s Handbook) are exclusively ...


4

It's a mystery, but the contradiction is noted in D&D canon. Beholders were originally chaotic in the Greyhawk supplement (1975), but many creature alignments changed when AD&D introduced the two-axis system in 1977. They are lawful evil in the 1st edition Monster Manual, the 2nd edition Monstrous Compendium Volume 1, the D&D 3.0 and 3.5 Monster ...


12

Great Wheel—1e kinda, 2e, 3e, 5e You are correct that the Great Wheel cosmology was used in at least 2e, 3e, and 5e. It was codified, and most thoroughly detailed, in 2e’s Planescape setting. Prior to Planescape, the cosmology wasn’t named, but nonetheless something sort of like the Great Wheel had been gradually developing and emerging from the various ...


2

You can raise them Every edition of D&D has spells for raising the dead. You might not be able to do anything in particular with bits of god corpse as materials, but you could also raise dead (or, more likely, appropriate other spell that raises ancient dead deities instead of peasant victims of local sawmill accidents) and then you have a live god. ...


14

They can be mined for resources According to A Guide to the Astral Plane, p.38, a dead god's corpse can be mined for a variety of things, including: Mineral resources, including gemstones, adamantine, mithral, rare magical ores, and other metals Unique plants, fungi, and grubs which grow on the corpse Godsblood, a rare curative substance Strange forms of ...


14

A potential use? Creating an entire world To the extent that Norse mythology has been included in DnD (at least the pantheon is part of the PHB), you could consider the Norse story of creation, particularly what happened when the mighty Ymir [1] died: Odin and his brothers slew Ymir and set about constructing the world from his corpse. They fashioned ...


24

There's a little bit Dungeon 100 gives us an adventure to the Lich-Queen's palace in Tu'narath, built on a dead god known only as The One In The Void. Caverns beneath the palace lead to the petrified heart of the faded god, which contains chambers perfused with emotion, ectoplasmic residues, and in one place the "breath" of the dead god, which provides a ...


43

One example is the morkoth, as described in Volo's Guide to Monsters. Spawned by a God. Long ago, a deity of greed and strife perished in the battles among the immortals. Its body drifted through the Astral Plane, eventually becoming a petrified husk. This corpse floated up against a pearlescent remnant of celestial matter imbued with life and life-giving ...


21

It was described in Book of Vile Darkness (2002) Dark Speech is described in greater detail in the D&D 3rd edition product Book of Vile Darkness (2002), p.32-33: There exists a langauge so dire, so inherently full of spite, malice, corruption, and hatred that it is simply called the Dark Speech. This is the secret language of evil gods, so foul and ...


-1

Magic Item / Spell Creation Tables AD&D (2e) has some very exact tables/processes for crafting your own magic items and spells. For instance, if you wanted to make an item that combined Boots of Elvenkind and Slippers of Spider Climbing, you just looked it up on a table and you knew about how much down time it'd take and what it'd cost. Want to make ...


9

Devils are immortal In 5E, the Monster Manual entry on Devils has this to say: Dark Dealers and Soul Mongers. Devils are confined to the Lower Planes, but they can travel beyond those planes by way of portals or powerful summoning magic. They love to strike bargains with mortals seeking to gain some benefit or prize, but a mortal making such a bargain ...


10

Yes, several. Most sourcebooks prior to D&D 5th edition make no mention of the invulnerability property of a phylactery, implying that they can be destroyed normally. Most lich phylacteries in D&D 3rd edition for example are merely extremely tough, and can be destroyed with sufficient force. However, special methods for destroying a lich's ...


19

There are several examples from 5th Edition, most of which are from the Waterdeep Campaign Dungeon of the Mad Mage. Beware: Spoilers abound 1 2 3 4 Another, somewhat simpler example, is found in Curse of Strahd


6

Apparently, one can be destroyed merely by damaging it This is a rather lackluster example, and I hope anyone can come up with a better example than this, but technically, there is an example in the D&D 5e adventure Curse of Strahd: However, this seems to be thrown in as an afterthought, and doesn't really go along with the premise of a "quest in and ...


Top 50 recent answers are included