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4

Dragons being able to breathe elements is an innate magical ability Dragons are inherently magical creatures, which is why their bodyparts are so sought-after for alchemy and magic item crafting. Being able to breathe fire is only one of the things that is magical about a dragon, most Red Dragons who can breathe fire will also be able to control fire in ...


21

Dragons have a special gland which generates the breath weapon According to the D&D 3rd edition sourcebook Draconomicon (2003), chapter 1, a true dragon's breath weapon is produced by an organ in the chest known as the draconis fundamentum. The draconis fundamentum (7) is a gland possessed only by true dragons. Attached to the heart, it is the ...


0

Some adventure gamebooks used to contain random number tables. The Lone Wolf series mimic a d10, e.g.: https://www.projectaon.org/en/xhtml/lw/01fftd/random.htm. The instructions were: To do this take a pencil and, with your eyes closed, point with the blunt end of it onto the Random Number Table. I believe TSR's 1 on 1 Adventure Gamebooks contained a ...


1

You cannot answer this based on RAW. As described in the other answers the petrified condition by rules, neither prevents nor requires a person to sleep. What happens if we try to apply real world physiology? Since the person can awake again if a spell breaks the petrification, I think assuming the person is in deep sleep while petrified is acceptable. ...


6

In general, this is not possible (RAW) Dream only works on a creature that is asleep. Nothing in the petrified condition says that the petrified creature falls asleep - in fact, it is not even unconscious (the game condition). However, there are a few nuances to this: The target of Dream does not have to be asleep - it only has to be a creature that can ...


2

It does appear to be RAW. Dream states If the target is asleep, the messenger appears in the target's dreams and can converse with the target as long as it remains asleep [...] If the target is awake when you cast the spell, the messenger knows it, and can either end the trance (and the spell) or wait for the target to fall asleep, at which point ...


24

Dragon #93 (1985) includes the article "Ay pronunseeAYshun gyd", written by Frank Mentzer, which has guidance on how to pronounce the names of a vast array of monsters from 1e AD&D, including Slaad (the article has notable errors regarding how to pronounce some genuine English words, but can probably taken to be authoritative on its made up ones). The ...


4

Chips/tokens When I first started in 1975, we used plastic poker chips, but that's already been answered here. We had five bowls: 1d4(4 chips), 1d8(8 chips), 1d10(10 chips), 1d12(12 chips), 1d20(20 chips). The six-sided dice were from the old Monopoly(TM) game in the closet(a sixth bowl for d6(6 chips) also works). A d100 was rolled by taking a d10 and ...


3

In support of other answers, here are some additional historical notes about D&D's tabletop scaling factor (which may be related but necessarily the same as standard map squares). In 1974, Original D&D was printed with the specification that 1" = 10 feet in dungeons (and 1" = 10 yards outside). Articles from Dragon magazine assert this was a ...


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D&D 3rd edition (2000-2003) The five-foot square was not standardized on until D&D 3rd edition, which made it a standard part of the rules in the original core rulebooks published in the year 2000. However, 10ft and hybrid 10ft/5ft squares still appeared in some dungeon maps until the D&D v3.5 revision (2003), which encouraged the designed ...


9

According to some basic searches, it seems the battle grid of 5 feet seems to have been used a lot during 2nd edition, but it was made the standard during 3rd. And deeply codified by the time of release of D20 SRD. Keep in mind that the grid is a variant rule in 5e, and isn't technically required for a Rules as Written game. The grid is what you make it ...


10

It comes from the druid's connection to nature, and was originally a druid spell. Flame blade actually first appeared in Dragon #71 (March 1983), in the article New druid spells... naturally!, by Gary Gygax. In that article, it was originally a druid-only spell. The material components were mistletoe and a leaf of sumac, and the blade was wielded as a ...


6

3e Answer from the Dragon Magazine There is a canon (semi)answer in the Dragon issue 351 (January 2007, 3.5e), under the article "Athas and the World Serpent Inn". Some details from that article can be found in this post about entering and exiting Athas. As a part of the article a new feat is described, aptly named "Defiler", for those casters that arrive ...


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