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8

Sort of, within product lines, but not in any reliable way. White Wolf released a variety of core games organized around a common setting and metaplot, along with splats to fill in more details for specific in-game groups, settings, and events. The release schedule was largely focused on releasing new games at intervals (such as Werewolf: the Apocalypse ...


8

It's better to think of the different splats as different games, sharing the same setting and rules structure. D&D doesn't have a joint setting, just setting books, which means the game itself is the core book and then the setting books are supplements. WoD is its setting, which means each splatbook is the corebook for that game, and supplements would be ...


2

vicky_molokh- unsilence Monica has an excellent answer. I second everything said there. However, it is incomplete in context because you also ask which are compatible. Vicky's answer touches on that, but I think the answer in that area is incomplete. In a sense, none of them are. In another sense, all of them are. Summary and a bit of history Chronicles ...


0

The scenarios Core posits for Will aren't exactly proactive either. I mean, okay, locking particle effects with an enemy mage and screaming "WIZARD BATTLE!" is pretty proactive, but that's an optional extra for extra settings. What's everything else? "Perducci's transactions must have left a trail somewhere in this assayer's archive! INVESTIGUESQUE!" ...


5

According to this May 26 tweet by Fred Hicks: Skills (or whatever you care to call your rated attributes) are a cosmetic feature and should not be taken as canon from any source including Core. You should be clear about and define your scope for each skill specific to the implementation you create.


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