81

They answer the question of “where did you put your arrows such that they’re easily accessible?” If you tell me, as DM, that you have 20 arrows but no quiver, then I’m wondering where the arrows are and how you’re grabbing them to shoot your bow. Some alternative answers might be fine, but if they’re just stowed in your pack somewhere, then I will probably ...


59

D&D is a rules set, not a setting. Therefore details like this are never RAW, but they may be described in a setting. For example, if you play in the Forgotten Realms, there may be some canon as to the availability of banking there. If it's your/your GM's own world, then it is completely up to you. In most fantasy worlds there's not widely available ...


54

I'm going to challenge the frame. You've said your group finds it boring to compute encumbrance. So to solve that you've... created another system for encumbrance? That just calculates things differently? That doesn't seem to solve your actual problem. If your group doesn't want to deal with encumbrance, have you considered just ignoring it? You're ...


53

Yes, those're the rules. That's really all there is to it. Except here's a bit more. PS: I know D&D isn't meant to be a realistic sumulation, but still. There are times in the history of D&D when it's tried to be a more-realistic simulation. For your purpose I'd recommend taking a look at racial bonuses/decrements to stats; perhaps the PHB1e? Many ...


44

So, ultimately, we're looking at a way to maximize a PC's strength score, and multiply their carry capacity as many times as possible. This is easy enough. You need a Goliath, Orc, Bugbear, or Firbolg (all from Volo's Guide) who is an 18th Level Druid. They should be wearing a Belt of Frost Giant Strength and carrying a pile of Potions of Growth. Those 4 ...


44

Storm Giants are Huge creatures, not Medium. The encumbrance rules neglect the size of a creature when calculating if it is encumbered or heavily encumbered. While this is true, the maximum capacity of a Storm Giant is not the same that a human would have given it a Strength score of 29. Quoting the rules on lifting and carrying (Player's Handbook, page 176):...


40

Yes Yes, a familiar can carry loads if it can properly grip or support them, including a willing creature if they fall within this weight limit. However, a hawk can only carry 37.5 pounds, as it is a Tiny creature, and thus its carry capacity is halved (PHB 176 'Size and Strength').


35

Yes, but so can a halfling AFAIK, this is the only use of the word “animal” as opposed to “beast” anywhere in the rules. Assuming this was a deliberate choice (rather than a mistake) then the authors intended it to mean something different. As such, it should be given a broad reading as encompassing anything in the animal kingdom - beasts, humanoids, ...


30

This is a slightly foggy area...but thankfully, Jeremy Crawford (official voice of rules for WotC) has weighed in on this in several (indirect) ways... Q: what are the rules for creatures carrying friendly PCs? e.g mage polymorphed into giant eagle carrying allies? (5e) A: See "Lifting and Carrying" in the Player's Handbook (p. 176) for rules on ...


28

I found no mention of this issue in the books or sage advice, so you should make your own ruling. We can see that both wearing heavy armor with low strength by the default rules and being encumbered by the optional rules reduces your speed by 10ft. If we treat these as equivalents, dwarves should never become encumbered because they wear armor. This leads ...


28

Quivers have the same point as a suitcase when you fly on an airplane. When you check in your baggage at the airport, your suitcase (which has an empty weight of a few pounds) is also filled with clothes and other things that each have their own weight. On the scale at the airport, the result is the total weight of container and its contents. The person at ...


26

While Pathfinder is great at letting the player know what's on his character's body and how much all of that weighs, it's not so good at measuring freight or determining weight and value of household goods. These are better off abstracted into just gp values and raw weights instead of individual fruits and vegetables. That is, if the players want to spend ...


26

Nowhere in the books does it say that there are any special rules for a flying creature's carrying capacity so it's calculated the same as every other PC; Strength score multiplied by 15. This is also unofficially backed by Jeremy Crawford, one of the lead designers for 5e, in a pair of tweets from May 2016: Q: What are the rules for creatures carrying ...


26

As you know, Powerful Build and the Bear totem ability stack. For the same reasons, Brawny and the Bear totem ability also stack. However, Brawny and Powerful Build won't stack. You count as if you were one size larger for the purpose of determining your carrying capacity. Your size is Medium. When you get Powerful Build, you count as Large for the ...


25

No. The game doesn't get that fiddly Characters and their carrying capacity, and lifting capacity, is as granular1 and simulationist as the game gets. The Encumbrance rules are a variant/optional rule. (The campaigns I am in use them, but not all tables do). Adding the problem of volume/cube for characters creates a significant bookkeeping and ...


23

From the Player's Handbook, page 147, in the descriptions of weapon properties: Heavy. Small creatures have disadvantage on attack rolls with heavy weapons. A heavy weapon’s size and bulk make it too large for a Small creature to use effectively. Carrying capacity has no effect on your ability to use heavy weapons without disadvantage. That's determined ...


23

No, a character’s own body weight does not encumber them. The word “carry” refers to other objects, not yourself. (“To carry yourself” is a phrase in English, but it has little to do with body weight in most cases, and in any event is not used by the Player’s Handbook.) It may encumber other characters, if those characters attempt to carry them. This is ...


23

According to the rules, yes, a rat can carry 15 pounds. The Basic Rules section for Using Ability Scores describes how Strength and size affect carry capacity. Carrying Capacity. Your carrying capacity is your Strength score multiplied by 15. Push, Drag, or Lift. You can push, drag, or lift a weight in pounds up to twice your carrying capacity (or 30 times ...


23

You are carrying the clothes you are wearing. This is not spelled out explicitly in the PHB or DMG, but I think this is common sense. Anything on your person that is not on you when you are totally naked contributes to the weight you are carrying. If I weigh myself naked, I am going to weigh less than when I weigh myself when I put on my jeans, shirt, belt, ...


22

5e offers no guidance on the subject of equipment weight for differently sized creatures Unlike previous editions, nowhere in 5e's published rules is the question of equipment weight for larger or smaller creatures addressed. The DMG's section on designing new monsters briefly addresses weapons sized for larger creatures: Big monsters typically wield ...


21

Yes1 Medium and Small characters have the same carrying capacity. Large creatures get a boost, and Tiny creatures get a reduction. You've provided the only relevant quote yourself: Size and Strength. Larger creatures can bear more weight, whereas Tiny creatures can carry less. For each size category above Medium, double the creature's carrying capacity and ...


20

There are no special rules for a flying creature's carrying capacity, whether flying naturally or via a spell, so you just follow the normal rules found on page 176 of the PHB. This is also unofficially backed by Jeremy Crawford, one of the lead designers for 5e, in a pair of tweets from May 2016: Q: What are the rules for creatures carrying friendly PCs? e....


20

I think you're succumbing to the temptation to think of the DMG entry as describing an item, rather than describing an aspect of an item. It's really not so much Mariner's Armor as Mariner's Chainmail, Mariner's Plate Armor, Mariner's Studded Leather Armor, etc., and they're just listed as a single entry to save space. Check out the DMG p. 139: If a magic ...


20

Yes, these abilities should stack fully. While previous editions had rules around stacking multipliers, 5e doesn't, and even if it did, Powerful Build doesn't directly multiply your carrying capacity - it just makes you count as Large. Your carrying capacity as a Str 20 character = 20 × 15 = 300. Then being a Large creature (from Powerful Build) doubles ...


19

Quote from Christopher Perkins Christopher Perkins @ChrisPerkinsDnD: "Because that's how much they actually weigh." Source: Sage Advice Christopher Perkins is a game designer working for Wizards of the Coast. This quote was in response to a similar question about the weight of the maul and heavy crossbow. Wikipedia doesn't agree with him, but ...


19

In the vast majority of cases, you double their lift/push/drag/carrying capacity Size and Strength. Larger creatures can bear more weight, whereas Tiny creatures can carry less. For each size category above Medium, double the creature's carrying capacity and the amount it can push, drag, or lift. For a Tiny creature, halve these weights. —Lifting and ...


19

So in conclusion, Storm Giants must be about the weakest creatures in the Multi-verse on a pound for pound basis :P If you apply real-world physics of scaling as you attempted, this claim is generally right. That has to do with the square-cube law, which is summarized in the Science World article "What If Humans Were Giants?" as follows: The ...


19

To lift something is to elevate it from the ground. There's no reason this can't be an overhead lift, but you can't combine this with lateral movement. Lifting something upwards and moving it laterally is carrying, and these rules are for moving 'more than one can normally carry'. You can push, drag or lift more than you can normally carry, but the rules are ...


18

Generally speaking, Encumbrance rules do not apply in overland travel. There are rules for faster and slower travel overland, but they aren't affected by how much weight an individual character is carrying—because they aren't affected by a character's movement speed at all. For example, it's not uncommon to have a party who, through various means, has lots ...


17

Yes, armour counts towards encumbrance. If you're wearing 65lb plate armour, it doesn't count as weighing nothing because you're trained in its use. Weapons also count: lugging around a maul or pike weighs you down.


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