New answers tagged

4

You fall if you end your turn in the air and nothing else is holding you aloft If something is defined in terms of rounds, the DM switches to round based time scale when it becomes relevant. They might not ask everyone to roll initiative, but instead do it in their head. The intent here clearly is that a barbarian can not stay in the air for longer than 6 ...


0

Feather Tokens Rather than using Scrolls of Featherfall which, as you mentioned, would only work for Wizards, Bards and Sorcerers, instead consider using Feather Tokens: This small metal disk is inscribed with the image of a feather. When you fall at least 20 feet while the token is on your person, you descend 60 feet per round and take no damage from ...


1

Narrative, not gameplay Since you are starting the campaing that way, whatever happens should not relate to your characters capabilities: their survival should be part of the narrative, not of the gameplay. There are various real examples of dramatic freefalls, almost always involving deep snow and hitting a slope with some angle. This way physics alone ...


10

Actually it's Not That Big a Deal 5e fall damage explicitly caps out at 20d6. That's, on average, 70 damage (p. 183 PHB). A character falls 500 feet/round (XGTE, p. 77). Falling 3000 feet would take 6 turns. A level 16 Wizard or Sorcerer will have, at minimum, 6+Con + 15d6 + 15*Con HP. With a 14 Con, that's 90.5 HP average (more using fixed values). 20d6 ...


2

You have control over where they fall--make sure they land on something soft enough to make the fall survivable. This isn't that hard a task--back in WWII Russia actually conducted experiments with paratroopers jumping without a chute. The landing was deep snow--still dangerous but the question was whether it was safer than hanging under a chute while ...


6

Let the players figure out a solution When this event occurs, be open to their solutions. Do not dismiss them, but don't let them automatically work either. You need to facilitate both the problem and the solution. Let the party figure out their own creative solutions. Don't just give them scrolls of featherfall. For example, Foo the Rogue immediately ...


6

So many ways So, first, the ways that involve people not actually dying: Be a half-orc or (Amonkhetian) minotaur, have enough hp. In order to die from a fall as a 16th-level half-orc or minotaur, you need to take twice your max hp in damage. Your max hp as a wizard with a measly d6 HD and probable +1 CON mod is probably 80. 20d6 (terminal velocity) ...


12

Destiny, AKA however the players describe the outcome Given that, if they don't survive, there is no campaign, the right way to handle this is to cut to after the fall and let each player describe, in flashback, how they survived. They don't have to roll skill checks or anything because you already know they succeeded, by whatever powers or cleverness or ...


72

In short: Don't do this. I would suggest that starting your game with a challenge or scenario that has the potential to immediately kill one or more characters is setting a poor tone for the game. I'm not saying "go easy on your players"; but I am saying that you need to have a non-fatal outcome planned for what happens when the dice just decide they'd ...


19

Use a skill challenge The skill challenge lets a party of 16th level characters fall in a successful manner without the need for the DM to know the means of success. Moreover, prompting the party with a skill challenge lets them know "now is the time to get creative", you might even take this opportunity to tell them outright. Start the skill challenge ...


13

Backgrounds aren't built to provide mechanical combat features Should I simply give him advantage on the attack roll, ignore fall damage, and call it a day? If you did that, your PC is doing something like "Slow Fall" which is a class feature (4th level) of a Monk and, when you offer advantage, is getting part of the Assassin (Rogue) archetype from 3rd ...


14

The trick here is he is trying to get a mechanic, (a class feature) for free. There are ways to mitigate falling damage so you could do this. Slow Fall Beginning at 4th level, you can use your Reaction when you fall to reduce any Falling damage you take by an amount equal to five times your monk level. (PHB, Monk, p. 78) Monks get a class feature ...


33

The problem is this part of the falling rules: The creature lands prone, unless it avoids taking damage from the fall. You are suggesting you give the PC advantage on the attack and no damage when they really should be landing prone after taking damage. The question then is whether negating the damage is fair or not. The problem with the falling rules ...


Top 50 recent answers are included