56

Fate has a much more narrative approach, less GM authority, and player-based plot control mechanisms. This can make for trouble transitioning from a more adversarial GMing environment. Fate Core (and other recent Fate games such as Dresden) actually do a pretty good job of providing a suggested "menu" of powers and stunts for players to take; show them to ...


32

You can run dark gritty games in Fate Accelerated, and light games in Fate Core. Fate Accelerated is Fate Core in a lot of ways—it's built out of that engine—it just shows you how to run the game with less mechanical detail. But mechanical detail is not an equivalence for grit, despite what other games in the RPG field have tried to teach us on that point. ...


31

Players working together like this is normal and expected. It's all fine as long as the player with the present PC is not bothered by the input from the other players and has the final say. Fate Core, page 4 Both players and gamemasters also have a secondary job: make everyone around you look awesome. Fate is best as a collaborative endeavor, with ...


28

Use the approach which makes sense for how you're shooting at the time. Approaches were a little difficult to wrap my head around at first. Unlike skills, they aren't about what I'm doing: they're about how I'm doing it. Any approach could be appropriate for shooting a gun, depending on the context of the action. Lining up a sniper shot? I'll Carefully ...


28

There's a distinct demarcation in games between the Player and the Character. And in most games when such things come up, it's relegating the player to the same position as the character- and trying to force the player to solve problems is if he is the character. There is nothing wrong with that approach, in any game. And there's also nothing wrong with ...


25

Fred Hicks (the dude who cofounded Evil Hat) talked about exactly this in an official blog post: One-Note Approaches in FAE. It's worth a read. The bottom line is this: there is nothing that is inherently a problem about people primarily using their +3 approach. That's fine. If everyone's having fun, then everything is working well. The real problem, as ...


24

Their Sample Problems Blind Sniper exists due to not putting scope limits and/or not saying No; some versions have a scope limit on aspects, as in, "No more than one scene aspect, no more than one personal aspect, no more than one gear aspect, and no more than one campaign aspect per roll." This makes it a bit harder for players to use aspects creatively, ...


24

This is going to take some deconstructing, because you're mixing up concepts that do exist with concepts that don't. Default difficulty: doesn't exist. Let's get something important straightened out: Fate doesn't have a 'default' difficulty. It's noteworthy those Core and Accelerated passages you're quoting from never use the word 'default' anywhere. That ...


24

Economies of scale. From Fred Hicks of Evil Hat, publishers of FAE: We printed like 13,000 copies of those. Because we hit that economy of scale, our actual cost (not counting up front costs of writing — minimal — and art — reasonable) came in at less than 40 cents per copy (close to 35). To make a MSRP $5, 40-page book work for distribution our costs ...


23

I wouldn't call FAE a "lite" version of Fate because it is a complete game. There aren't any gaps in the ruleset where you have to graduate to the "full" version. FAE does let new players get started quickly, but you could also use FAE to transition a group of habitual Dungeons and Dragons players to Fate. Differences As RPG systems go, Fate Core is on the ...


23

You do appear to be missing some stuff here. Here's how I'd handle your situation. (As a foreword: bear in mind your players and the player characters being unaware of an aspect are two very different things, so you should make sure you distinguish between them.) Entering the Scene You said you entered a Forest with a River in it. The forest itself is ...


22

I don't have my books handy, so I can't quote rules for you, but here's my recollection based on several years of playing Fate: Players can narrate their own actions. And they can answer questions that you ask them - filling in blanks and taking a portion of the burden of narration from you. But when they want to create facts to their own advantage, they ...


20

Normally I don't answer questions after the answered sign has been given, but I do believe that there is still much to say. So without much farther ado, let's dive in. Questions Yeah, it has been written before, but it still worth mentioning. If your players didn't give you a clear description, ask them for more input. While some of the answerers did ...


20

Sharing some responsibility over the world is an essential part of Fate. The players have far more agency over the nature of the world than in other games, and part of that comes with a more 60/40 distribution of responsibility over the game compared to many others. That leads to what can feel like a lighter workload for the GM, and might be pretty alarming ...


19

Fate is all about creating interesting stories. Progressive stress box values are designed to do exactly that. The rules say that to absorb Stress, you have to mark off a box that has equal or bigger value than the number of shifts received. If you can't, you have to take a Consequence to reduce those shifts to a more manageable number. This implies a ...


19

Does a good Aspect say one thing? Or more than one thing? We see in much Fate material the advice that a good Aspect says more than one thing. OK: sort of. It should say one thing and then say more about that one thing. It shouldn't say many things which aren't directly related to each other. Many wordy drafts of Aspects contain information which don't ...


18

I run away and hide. "Where do you run away to? How do you hide?" I steal the wrench from him. "Just run up and snatch it?" If the above seems like too much effort, you probably shouldn't be GMing. Players often blurt out the gist of their actions and need a little prodding or time to get them to fully describe what they want to do. Give them a chance. ...


18

Stress is a pacing mechanic. It's a way to control how fast and intense your conflicts are. Messing with this changes the kind of stories Fate tells, by changing how seriously PCs take conflicts. Increasing the speed at which you can use stress boxes shifts the pace of conflict. Characters with multiple stress boxes become much less squishy against large ...


18

Someone trying to declare an out-of-scope story detail with a Fate point is handled pretty simply: justification is needed, and the GM can veto. Summarising the relevant parts of the Fate Core section on fate points: The player should be able to justify the story details by relating them to existing aspects. (Usually this is a no-brainer; of course ...


17

In-fiction awesomeness is more appropriate as a reward than mechanical advantages. Players love to see their characters being awesome. Doing this leverages Fate's essential design, which is to move in a regular oscillation from narration to mechanics and back again. There are mechanical rewards possible, but Fate doesn't provide any guidance for what ...


17

Fractal is the way to go here. Try this on for size, some trimming may be needed for it to fit perfectly. I'm going to be assuming she speaks Latin fluently, and the rest of the party speaks modern English where assumptions need to be made. High Concept: Language Barrier Aspects: Romance Language Family, Ancient Tongue, Seeming Similarity ...


17

From the perspective of someone just entering the world of RPG, and using FAE as my first attempt. FAE makes frequent references to the Fate manual, particularly in the aspect of being a GM, and to a lessor degree in world creation and other similar facts. It seems to me that the Fate system is complete, and while FAE is mostly complete, it still lacks a ...


17

The most useful way to create a Fate Accelerated pregen character is: just barely, and then jump into the game immediately and let people fill in the blanks when they need to. Aeon Wave (which is pay what you want, including free) does this to great success, and is a sci-fi game based on six premade characters. It's for Fate Core, but you may want to adapt ...


16

Point by point comparison Fate Core skill driven - characters competency is in specific fields of endeavor. Stress track increases from base with certain skills and certain stunts, thus not all are equally able to take stress Separate Physical and Mental stress tracks, plus optionally, Wealth, Magic, and Karma stress tracks. PC's by default start with one ...


16

Let's see what the SRD has to say on the matter 1. Players pay up, the GM compels for free if a player wants to compel another character, it costs a fate point to propose the complication. The GM can always compel for free, and any player can propose a compel on his or her own character for free (ref). What this means for you : if the GM compels an NPC, ...


16

No, you don't. Anyway, even if that was the case, their SRD contain the complete rules of both games. heatenJesus informs me that sometimes the FAE rules points at the Fate Core rules "for more detail".


15

You're gonna have to go to the Fate Core book for the full explanation. Although they don't mention it for this particular case, FAE makes a habit of expecting players to refer to Core for more details on a host of subjects. This is because Fate Accelerated, in order to stay svelte, doesn't talk much about corner cases. Since multiple free invokes on one ...


15

So, yes, that stunt is awesome and very strong, given the right circumstances in which it can be used. Yes, it might even be a little bit broken. But yes there's things you can do about it to not have that be a problem, and I think there's a number of things you missed in how it gets leveraged. I also don't think we need to play wording trickery to find ...


15

The original player keeps it The fate point was offered, not given. It doesn't go anywhere if the offer is rejected, so it stays right where it is, in the original player's pool of fate points.


14

It All Depends on Your Narration Careful defense actions are difficult in combat, you are correct, and is more useful for active action Clever defense actions can include calculating the trajectory of an attack, noticing the hesitation before the attack, or even using a feint Flashy defense actions are all about style! Acrobatic leaps off of walls, slinging ...


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