56

Fate has a much more narrative approach, less GM authority, and player-based plot control mechanisms. This can make for trouble transitioning from a more adversarial GMing environment. Fate Core (and other recent Fate games such as Dresden) actually do a pretty good job of providing a suggested "menu" of powers and stunts for players to take; show them to ...


42

Consider it a self-compel Although concession does give you greater control over your fate, you're still losing--and you're choosing to lose when you still have a chance of winning. you can interrupt any action at any time before the roll is made to declare that you concede the conflict. (Fate Core 167) That means if the dice are rolled and you're taken ...


35

First off, DFRPG is full of "the group should agree" (YS92), "keep in mind the intended play style" (YS31), "make sure your players are okay this" (YS338), "make sure you're on the same page as your players" (341), and "when in doubt, talk it through with your group" (YS99). In many places throughout this book, the phrase “the GM decides” is often used ...


34

Well, the systems are really in different paradigms, but I'll boil some of the differences down for you. First the concepts you have to throw away. Attributes. There aren't any. There is no way to say that character a has a strength of 18 and character b has a strength of 15. Levels. Again, there aren't any. There is a way to judge power level, but it ...


34

"Doctor! It hurts when I move my arm like this!" "So don't do that, then…" On page 168, the rules discuss what it means to be "Taken Out" — and, in particular, what the circumstances are like in groups where Taken Out equates to "dead": So, if you think about it, there’s not a whole lot keeping someone from saying, after taking you out, that your ...


34

Yes, the rules do offer a way to steer things on track when people are using an inappropriate skill choice. Your primary source is the Golden Rule: Decide what you’re trying to accomplish first, then consult the rules to help you do it. What are they trying to do? Reel in a fish. What mechanics are going to help them do that? Physique or Athletics. ...


32

The specifics are going to depend on your implementation of Fate, but in Standard Fate (and Fate Core), when you Create an Advantage (or create a temporary aspect), you get a free invocation. I'm going to quote the rule from Fate Core: Free invocations work like normal ones except in two ways: no fate points are exchanged, and you can stack them with a ...


32

Aspects determine what is important in the scene. Those scene aspects defined when the scene is framed are the ones that the GM deemed to be important in the scene; the ones that add flavor to the narrative. However, narrative games like fate share the narrative direction with the players. In this particular case, though the GM didn't deem the fact that ...


32

You can run dark gritty games in Fate Accelerated, and light games in Fate Core. Fate Accelerated is Fate Core in a lot of ways—it's built out of that engine—it just shows you how to run the game with less mechanical detail. But mechanical detail is not an equivalence for grit, despite what other games in the RPG field have tried to teach us on that point. ...


31

Players working together like this is normal and expected. It's all fine as long as the player with the present PC is not bothered by the input from the other players and has the final say. Fate Core, page 4 Both players and gamemasters also have a secondary job: make everyone around you look awesome. Fate is best as a collaborative endeavor, with ...


30

Yes, each player has the right to refuse a compel. But you already knew that, really. It's not a "group compel" at all, there's no such thing. Since every player in the group has the aspect, you're making multiple individual event compels. The issue is wrapping our heads around what that means for the narrative, which turns out to be kinda cool. Refusing ...


29

Brute forcing is going to be solved by application of two principles. Neither of them are totally rules-oriented. The rules aren't interested in stopping brute-forcing, because sometimes it's fun: you're in a contest, you need to get through that door before someone finds you, and it might be fun to just kick it in several times until it smashes into ...


28

So far, we have two answers, which appear to contradict each other. I tend to think in practice they're not that far apart from each other, tho. When you're taken out, you cede control over your fate to the attacker. That means the attacker can assert all sorts of things about what happens to you. Like: you're dead. And because total destruction of the ...


28

There's a distinct demarcation in games between the Player and the Character. And in most games when such things come up, it's relegating the player to the same position as the character- and trying to force the player to solve problems is if he is the character. There is nothing wrong with that approach, in any game. And there's also nothing wrong with ...


28

Fate characters are proactive, competent and dramatic It may seem like that's a given for just about any game: who wouldn't want competent, proactive, dramatic characters in their games? But some genres don't work that way. Horror is a notable example. Most horror games turn on characters feeling powerless, which is not what Fate does - horror in Fate ...


26

Because it discourages zero-sum exchanges. Someone just asked this of Fred Hicks in the Fate Core Kickstarter comments. He replied that if Fate points are exchanged immediately after the action in which they were used, the flow of Fate points would become zero-sum. I have an aspect you're invoking, to my detriment, so I'm gonna be getting that fate point....


26

Yes, you're reading it wrong. Each stress box can absorb a number of shifts of its ordinal or less, and you can only use one at a time. Not just mooks. From p.160: When you take stress, check off a stress box with a value equal to the shift value of the hit. If that box is already checked, check off a higher value box. If there is no higher available box, ...


25

Summary: Negative aspects are easy "push button here" dispensers for Fate points, but spamming that button needlessly is boring at best. Two things need to be kept in mind: drama, and the Fate point economy. Being stymied or drained of Fate points by the same problem over and over isn't dramatic or interesting, so don't do it. But the Fate points must flow! ...


25

You can download the official Fate Core font from Evil Hat's licensing page, as well as the "Powered by Fate" logo. This font contains a small number of glyphs, supporting Fudge Dice faces (0, +, -), the Four Actions (A, D, C, O), and some stress track boxes. They ask that you credit them in the works where you use it. Side note: Since you're looking to ...


24

Their Sample Problems Blind Sniper exists due to not putting scope limits and/or not saying No; some versions have a scope limit on aspects, as in, "No more than one scene aspect, no more than one personal aspect, no more than one gear aspect, and no more than one campaign aspect per roll." This makes it a bit harder for players to use aspects creatively, ...


24

This is going to take some deconstructing, because you're mixing up concepts that do exist with concepts that don't. Default difficulty: doesn't exist. Let's get something important straightened out: Fate doesn't have a 'default' difficulty. It's noteworthy those Core and Accelerated passages you're quoting from never use the word 'default' anywhere. That ...


24

I'm going to dodge the main question, because it's a situation that shouldn't come up. Here's why: The situation you've outlined there involves at least two compels, not one. The first compel is the one already mentioned, which results in the transformation if the player accepts. The second compel, which you've skipped in the example, is compelling Ravenous ...


24

Fiction First Hi Marc. You are running into one of the differences between rules-first systems and fiction-first systems. Fiction-first means that the rules serve the story unfolding between the players: When something happens in the story that matches a trigger condition in the rules, the mechanics engage and the results feed back into the story. Outside ...


23

I wouldn't call FAE a "lite" version of Fate because it is a complete game. There aren't any gaps in the ruleset where you have to graduate to the "full" version. FAE does let new players get started quickly, but you could also use FAE to transition a group of habitual Dungeons and Dragons players to Fate. Differences As RPG systems go, Fate Core is on the ...


23

It is available as a pay-what-you-like (including free) download. Since Evil Hat recently made the Toolkit available under OGL, you can download the pdf from rpgnow.com or drivethrustuff.com. It's also online! You can access the Toolkit online as part of the Fate Core System Reference Document.


23

Yes, a character can choose to be taken out. Your stress and consequences are buffers against you being taken out. If any points of harm from an attack do not get absorbed by one of those two (or an equivalent), you're taken out. If you get hit by an attack, one of two things happen: either you absorb the hit and stay in the fight, or you’re taken out. ...


23

My initial suggestion is to attack the problem from a different angle. You say that in the early part of the encounter/investigation/episode, the players will not invest resources or better yet, garner points by putting themselves in situations to fail. That essentially means that they find the decisions they're making in the beginning of these sessions ...


23

What is your player trying to accomplish? Skills have trappings unique to themselves, and that's important: you can attack with Shoot but not with Athletics, barring a particular stunt or what-have-you. So before you choose your skill, determine what mechanical action the player's narrative act is best modelled by (attack, defend, create advantage, overcome)...


22

I don't have my books handy, so I can't quote rules for you, but here's my recollection based on several years of playing Fate: Players can narrate their own actions. And they can answer questions that you ask them - filling in blanks and taking a portion of the burden of narration from you. But when they want to create facts to their own advantage, they ...


22

Now there are two sides to that coin. The good part is that Fate is an awesome system when it comes to player-vs-player games. Sometimes the narrative leads to a situation when two player characters find themselves in the opposite sides of the fence. The typical fate mechanisms like invoking and compelling, coupled with the fate point economy, lends itself ...


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