42

Consider it a self-compel Although concession does give you greater control over your fate, you're still losing--and you're choosing to lose when you still have a chance of winning. you can interrupt any action at any time before the roll is made to declare that you concede the conflict. (Fate Core 167) That means if the dice are rolled and you're taken ...


29

Because it discourages zero-sum exchanges. Someone just asked this of Fred Hicks in the Fate Core Kickstarter comments. He replied that if Fate points were exchanged immediately after the action in which they were used, the flow of Fate points would become zero-sum: Let's imagine we're doing it your way. I have an aspect you're invoking, to my detriment, so ...


18

Someone trying to declare an out-of-scope story detail with a Fate point is handled pretty simply: justification is needed, and the GM can veto. Summarising the relevant parts of the Fate Core section on fate points: The player should be able to justify the story details by relating them to existing aspects. (Usually this is a no-brainer; of course ...


18

When you pay to propose a compel, the point you paid returns to the GM's infinite pool of fate points. The proposed compel is then negotiated with the target of the compel. Once the compel is agreed, a fate point is paid from the infinite pool of fate points to the target player. If the target player rejects the compel, their fate point is also paid to ...


17

Yes, GMs can spend Fate points without an NPC active in the scene. Fate points represent a game participant's agency to influence the scene, NOT the agency of the character that participant is playing. I feel free to spend Fate points to make things harder at dramatically appropriate times, because that's one of my jobs as the GM. This is what the Bronze ...


16

Compel Situation Aspects Fate and the Fate point economy is all about Aspects. Short of houseruling something, you're stuck with that, sorry. The character's aspects are not the only ones in existence, though. The SRD states Just like with every other kind of aspect use, you can use situation aspects (and by extension, game aspects) for compels. ...


16

The Fate Freeport Companion is a modern mechanical update for a setting from 2003; the Fate SRD is the newest version of the Fate engine, released in 2013. You will find discrepancies in the implementation of each system's ethos. Additionally: until last year's release of the Fate Core System book (the Fate SRD is this book in SRD form), there was no ...


13

I think that this is caused by several factors. We've used FATE points and aspects grafted onto Pathfinder, and also aspectless hero points (Infamy Points, in my current pirate game) that similarly can be used for successes or for declarations, and I've found the same behavior is common. Combat in D&D variants is usually life and death. In FATE and ...


13

Canonically, a player can probably demand a Fate Point for it not being a full moon, darn the luck. When faced with a lycanthrope PC, a GM will have to consider how often she's willing to stage stories near the time of the full moon - and, if she is willing, how much of a restriction the Human Form (Involuntary Change) really represents. (However, deciding ...


12

First off, what are you willing to count as a fair declaration for a fate point? In my group, a free aspect on the scene is always fair, the arrival of a missing PC is always fair, and that plus a semi-plausible story/excuse in exchange for the player's otherwise unimpeded concession is always fair. These are not all that declarations can do, but they form ...


12

You can find those rules in the Aspects & Fate Points chapter, under The Fate Point Economy. Page 82 of the book mentions the GM and Fate Points. You can read it here on the Fate SRD. In short: the GM starts with one fate point per PC in the encounter. As the GM, all your NPCs collectively tap into that (small) fate point pool.


11

rules based opinion: Since Fate Core is explicit about earning them, and having your compel rejected is not on that list, unlike prior fate, and barring errata to the contrary, I'd rule it goes away. You only earn Fate for 3 things per page 81: accepting a compel having your aspect invoked against you conceding in a conflict. Note that the GM can only use ...


11

Mechanically, it's a compel: Everyone taking part cites a reason why they’re getting involved by compelling one of their aspects. (ARRPG 132) I see three major reasons for handing out Fate points at the start of a brainstorming session. First, brainstorming is most dramatic (and thus most encouraged) when it takes place mid-combat. By joining the ...


10

There is no set "rule" on how serious it should be. Being a narrative component to the game, the severity is also hand-wavy. The compel should be severe enough that your players stop to think about it, maybe even give the GM—or whoever is offering the compel—an eyebrow raise, but not so severe that they pay it off without thinking. It's an art, to be sure, ...


8

Yes There is nothing the GM cannot do with their NPCs which players can do with their PCs, as far as gameplay actions go, so, declaring details in the middle of the action isn't off the table. And there's no reason the GM wouldn't spend the Fate point for it. To quote Declare a Story Detail on FC p. 13: "To do this, you’ll spend a fate point." However, ...


8

Fate Core's basic mechanics base the fate points you receive on the "Refresh" value of the character, which is in turn based on the number of stunts the character has. So it makes sense to assume that the fate points, according to the rules as written, belong to the character. Many Fate games do follow this pattern. That being said, I have been running my ...


8

You don't have to pay a fate point to use the Create an Advantage action. I'm afraid you misread wherever you think you read that, as the Fate Core System rules say no such thing.


6

Rules as written: No. The closest FAE comes is on page 12: Your character’s own aspects provide a good guide for what you can do. If you have an aspect that suggests you can perform magic, then cast that spell. If your aspects describe you as a swordsman, draw that blade and have at it. These story details don’t have additional mechanical impact. ...


6

Based on this meta question, I'm writing a new answer based on my improved understanding of the question. It seems like the PCs are spending their points, which is good. You're having trouble awarding points, so let's take a look at the specifics there. According to the book, there are only three ways PCs can earn Fate points (p.89): • Accept a Compel: You ...


6

You don't have to alter the (already fair and balanced) core mechanics in order to get more Fate points as GM: There are existing mechanics you can use to get more of them the "normal ways". Way 1: Like players, you get Fate points for conceding in Conflicts (Fate Core page 167). Way 2: Unlike players, you get Fate points at the beginning of every scene (...


6

You get Fate Points from adverse invokes at the end of the scene. Here, under invoking aspects: If the aspect you invoke is on someone else’s character sheet, including situation aspects attached to them, and the invoke is to their disadvantage, you give them the fate point you spent. (Invoking a third party’s aspect is treated just like invoking an ...


5

Because fiction. Realistically, it doesn't make sense that losing makes you more likely to win in the future. It doesn't make sense. But Fate couldn't care less about realism. It doesn't work on the rules of the real world. It works on the rules of fiction. And, in books, movies, and TV shows, there's a rhythm of highs and lows. You have a successful ...


5

All Fate Points spent to propose or refuse a compel are lost. Just spend them and they're gone. The GM doesn't pay to compel, ever, and players don't pay to compel their own character. If the GM pays to refuse a compel on one of their characters, it comes out of the scene pool. Informally speaking, if you think a compel would apply to someone else's ...


5

This question is a well deserved one, and I will answer it with a mixture of whatever I can find/remember in the book and my suggestions for house rules. I will endeavor to make it clear where the book starts and ends and what is simply an "educated guess" I have made. First an easy one, you didn't specifically ask it but as an easy first step I will ...


5

Tagging is described in the SRD. It means to make use of an aspect that isn't associated with your character (e.g. an aspect on another character, or on the scene). All the normal rules of aspect use apply. e.g. Using an aspect costs a fate point (with the exception that if you have invested some effort to create or introduce the aspect, you can tag it ...


5

You're right, you conflated two different mechanics. One of the cool things about Fate is that it often offers more than one mechanical tool for achieving similar story results, and this is such a case. Declaring a story detail is a negotiation with the group whereby you spend a fate point to just have something be true. The only way it can fail is if the ...


5

The Fate SRD answers this question immediately above the quoted section: When you award players fate points for compels or concession, they come out of an unlimited pool you have for doing so—you don’t have to worry about running out of fate points to award, and you always get to compel for free. My understanding is that the NPC Fate pool is only used ...


4

You've got a lot of separate questions rolled into one here. I'll try to answer 'em all. Typically, something as basic as summoning light I'd treat as a mundane effect (a 'free' spell). It's easily done via glowsticks, flashlights, switching on the lights... dozens of things other than magic. Unless there is specifically an aspect against there being ...


4

The severity of a compel depends on your game group. Compelling is a trade and if you find your players always paying to avoid your compels (or each other's) then the severity is too high. A timid group of players new to role-playing might not want surprises in the same way a group of seasoned and gonzo players might take any compel you give them just for ...


4

A compel should be severe enough for the compelling player to justify the fate point expenditure, and plausible enough for the compelled player so that they may consider accepting it. What that means depends so much on your story…


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