Hot answers tagged

104

Yes. There really isn’t anything more to say; you are playing a game. The goal is to have fun. Being uncomfortable isn’t fun, so why would you agree to spend your playtime on that? This is simply the reality of any cooperative, voluntary activity: everyone has to agree to play. Everyone has to actually want to play the game. Or else you have no game.


48

Here are pitfalls that I would watch out for: Confusing Stress with Hit Points - Stress is not hit points. Stress is not damage. Stress is a measure of your ability to avoid lasting consequences from conflicts. Don't get hung up on the false equivalence of Stress and "damage". Looking to the mechanics to drive the fiction - In Fate, the fiction drives, and ...


31

So far, we have two answers, which appear to contradict each other. I tend to think in practice they're not that far apart from each other, tho. When you're taken out, you cede control over your fate to the attacker. That means the attacker can assert all sorts of things about what happens to you. Like: you're dead. And because total destruction of the ...


31

Players working together like this is normal and expected. It's all fine as long as the player with the present PC is not bothered by the input from the other players and has the final say. Fate Core, page 4 Both players and gamemasters also have a secondary job: make everyone around you look awesome. Fate is best as a collaborative endeavor, with ...


30

Yes, each player has the right to refuse a compel. But you already knew that, really. It's not a "group compel" at all, there's no such thing. Since every player in the group has the aspect, you're making multiple individual event compels. The issue is wrapping our heads around what that means for the narrative, which turns out to be kinda cool. Refusing ...


30

There's a distinct demarcation in games between the Player and the Character. And in most games when such things come up, it's relegating the player to the same position as the character- and trying to force the player to solve problems is if he is the character. There is nothing wrong with that approach, in any game. And there's also nothing wrong with ...


30

Brute forcing is going to be solved by application of two principles. Neither of them are totally rules-oriented. The rules aren't interested in stopping brute-forcing, because sometimes it's fun: you're in a contest, you need to get through that door before someone finds you, and it might be fun to just kick it in several times until it smashes into ...


25

It becomes part of the character when it's more important than the other aspects that they have. Something as ephemeral as the Create Advantage action probably won't change a character in such a fundamental way, and (probably) neither will getting an item. Hmm. Example time: We've got a character with a couple of aspects: "Always stand up against bullies"...


25

Summary: Negative aspects are easy "push button here" dispensers for Fate points, but spamming that button needlessly is boring at best. Two things need to be kept in mind: drama, and the Fate point economy. Being stymied or drained of Fate points by the same problem over and over isn't dramatic or interesting, so don't do it. But the Fate points must flow! ...


25

Fred Hicks (the dude who cofounded Evil Hat) talked about exactly this in an official blog post: One-Note Approaches in FAE. It's worth a read. The bottom line is this: there is nothing that is inherently a problem about people primarily using their +3 approach. That's fine. If everyone's having fun, then everything is working well. The real problem, as ...


25

I run Evil Hat and am one of the originators of Fate, so I've got some XP to spend on this one. :) In either case you can include the entire content of the SRDs available on the Fate licensing site (see link below). OGL isn't viral per se, it simply stipulates you cannot close off content which was made open to you (the stuff you're reusing). I have done ...


25

Attacks do not usually have Aspects. Casting a Fireball (or whatever) usually just means rolling your Magic skill (or whatever you're using) and you can tag the Troll's "Vulnerable to Fire" aspect. You could also tag your own "I am good at Fire Magic" aspects to double up on it, though. It will cost 2 Fate points to do both, but in this case you can indeed ...


25

Should You? "Should you" is a question we can't answer-- only you know your level of discomfort, the social consequences of saying no to your player, etc. Can You? "Can you" is a question we can answer: Generally, yes. Yes, you can. A lot of GMs find it easy to make this judgment on behalf of their players: "No, your edgy dwarf ...


24

This is going to take some deconstructing, because you're mixing up concepts that do exist with concepts that don't. Default difficulty: doesn't exist. Let's get something important straightened out: Fate doesn't have a 'default' difficulty. It's noteworthy those Core and Accelerated passages you're quoting from never use the word 'default' anywhere. That ...


24

My initial suggestion is to attack the problem from a different angle. You say that in the early part of the encounter/investigation/episode, the players will not invest resources or better yet, garner points by putting themselves in situations to fail. That essentially means that they find the decisions they're making in the beginning of these sessions ...


24

Economies of scale. From Fred Hicks of Evil Hat, publishers of FAE: We printed like 13,000 copies of those. Because we hit that economy of scale, our actual cost (not counting up front costs of writing — minimal — and art — reasonable) came in at less than 40 cents per copy (close to 35). To make a MSRP $5, 40-page book work for distribution our costs ...


24

No, you're not missing anything, as far as the rule goes. Red Court vampires use the narcotic saliva to manipulate people, not to injure them. That's according to the rule you cited, and that's according to all fictional positioning from the source novels. The un-asked part of this question is about ways which a Red Court vampire could alter the flow and ...


24

Washed-out action in FATE Core often points to a problem with your table's agreement (or lack thereof) about what aspects mean. Let me start by saying I share your frustration. I confess a love/hate relationship with FATE. On paper, FATE Core should be the perfect story game. Aspects and the entire Fate point economy are essentially direct choices about what ...


23

You do appear to be missing some stuff here. Here's how I'd handle your situation. (As a foreword: bear in mind your players and the player characters being unaware of an aspect are two very different things, so you should make sure you distinguish between them.) Entering the Scene You said you entered a Forest with a River in it. The forest itself is ...


23

Yes, a character can choose to be taken out. Your stress and consequences are buffers against you being taken out. If any points of harm from an attack do not get absorbed by one of those two (or an equivalent), you're taken out. If you get hit by an attack, one of two things happen: either you absorb the hit and stay in the fight, or you’re taken out. ...


23

Scenes don't need dice. In fact, having scenes without dice is one indicator your group may be awesome. There are two basic reasons to use a mechanic in Fate: things aren't interesting, or you don't want to choose between two interesting things. Fate's mechanics are designed to make the story exciting: it's up to the group to decide what that means. If ...


23

Advantages shouldn't just be mechanical gatherings of numbers, they should meaningfully advance the story. Aspects, created by that move, are always true. which means they have narrative weight in the game. You should be using aspects not just to layer on debuffs to win, but to change the story in interesting ways. Think about the story first, not about the ...


22

None of these happen. They don't make sense or aren't using those mechanics properly, and ultimately, it's going to take a lot more than that to get this guy to join the war. A preliminary dip into basics. Since compels and invokes seem to be getting mishandled here, I'm going to take a brief dip into what they're for and how they work. Compelling characters ...


22

I'm going to create a completely system-agnostic answer here, but it will probably apply to you, especially considering the example of A Song of Ice and Fire. The reason that characters can drop like flies, even semi-randomly, in A Song of Ice and Fire without it detracting massively from the story, is because the story isn't about them. If someone whose ...


22

It's been my experience that the curve on 4dF is pretty much a sweet spot for "predictable unpredictability." Because most of the time the raw dice come in between -1 and +1, even a +1 on a skill will frequently mean the difference between failure and success against an easy difficulty. A +4 means your character will hardly ever fail if they're not being ...


21

Normally I don't answer questions after the answered sign has been given, but I do believe that there is still much to say. So without much farther ado, let's dive in. Questions Yeah, it has been written before, but it still worth mentioning. If your players didn't give you a clear description, ask them for more input. While some of the answerers did ...


21

You sure can! As per the "Affecting Multiple Targets" section of the SRD, you can either attach an Aspect to the scene (such as setting it On Fire): The easiest way to do this is to create an advantage on the scene, rather than on a specific target. A Gas-Filled Room has the potential to affect everyone in it, and it’s not too much of a stretch to ...


21

Gomad has a great list already. Here's a few more I've thought of. The first one, especially, is something I've both experienced, and heard of others experiencing: Understanding how aspects differ from traditional bonuses - Aspects may be "always true," but that doesn't mean they provide a constant mechanical effect, the way that a "+2 sword" might. They ...


20

When one is invested in failure, one takes the position that the goals of the player and the goals of the character are not always the same. Your character wants to succeed at everything they try, while you as a player want them to fail now and again -- not just because it makes things more interesting, but because doing so earns you Fate Points to guarantee ...


20

Lenny Balsera, one of the main system developers for Fate Core, has given an official answer as follows: So, first, the incongruity only comes up when you're talking about a Create Advantage action that piles invokes on an existing aspect. Making one from scratch, it all tracks: Creator succeeds with style, Defender fails, creator gets an aspect and two ...


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