Hot answers tagged

20

RAW: No, "The old feat can’t be one you used as a prerequisite..." Here, 'used' is past tense, and in the example given you did indeed use the feat as a prerequisite in the past. This could be flavored as the feat was the base knowledge upon which you built for the later feat and as such, losing the base knowledge would require you relearn the ...


17

It is one step; you add them at the same time (but that's OK) There are a number of Feats with Skill Point requirements and you do gain them simultaneously, but fortunately, Feats has this information about Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Some feats have prerequisites. Your character must have the indicated ability score, class feature, feat, skill, base ...


12

You may reroll any single damage die. Piercer states: Once per turn, when you hit a creature with an attack that deals piercing damage, you can reroll one of the attack's damage dice, and you must use the new roll. This is unambiguous - the feat does not discriminate between dice that may be rerolled. If a die is part of the attack's damage dice, it may be ...


12

A melee spell attack is considered a melee attack, even if it is done via a spell. The PHB/basic rules describe melee attacks as follows (emphasis mine): Used in hand-to-hand combat, a melee attack allows you to attack a foe within your reach. A melee attack typically uses a handheld weapon such as a sword, a warhammer, or an axe. A typical monster makes a ...


8

A melee spell attack is a melee attack The Player's Handbook and Basic Rules have the following description in the Combat section on melee attacks (emphasis mine): Used in hand-to-hand combat, a melee attack allows you to attack a foe within your reach. A melee attack typically uses a handheld weapon such as a sword, a warhammer, or an ax. A typical monster ...


8

Option (1) has a potential problem, that you can spam Greater Restoration as a ritual. The DC to avoid exhaustion is 15; but a bard higher enough level to cast Greater Restoration will almost certainly succeed on that save considerably more than 50% of the time - so the cost of casting a normally-non-ritual spell ("I might take a level of exhaustion!&...


7

Yes, Multispell is preposterously powerful.¹ Between all the pre-epic options for making metamagic cheaper, and the new epic options like Improved Spell Capacity, there is no real reason not to just cast all the spells you need every turn. Well before epic levels, the most important constraint on a character’s ability to accomplish their goals is not spell ...


7

Yes, each gauntlet is an individual melee weapon. The Thunder Gauntlets state: Each of the armor's gauntlets counts as a simple melee weapon This indicates that each gauntlet is individually a simple melee weapon, each wielded in one hand. The rules for two weapon fighting state: When you take the Attack action and attack with a light melee weapon that ...


7

The actual vowing is written in the description of the feat, before the prerequisites or benefit of the feat. Effectively, then, you make the vow “as” you get the feat. Vows don’t necessarily have to be attached to feats—you don’t need Sacred Vow to make one and you don’t have to take another feat to vow specific things. For that matter, it’s not as though ...


7

As noted in the comments, I don't see any benefit to having the spell copied multiple times in the same book (please correct me if I'm wrong). So long as the correct amount of resources are spent for each copying (or GM could rule reduced resources based on available experience, knowledge etc.) there is nothing stopping you from making multiple copies in the ...


6

You can copy the same spell in the ritual book multiple times. But you can already cast a ritual spell multiple times when you have inscribed it once. Nothing in the feat and no other mechanic prevents you from copying the same spell into your ritual book multiple times. But most of the time, doing so is a waste of resources because when you have one copy of ...


6

Some Touch spells always 'hit' The range of touch has been altered since the rules from Pathfinder 1st edition. A spell with a range of touch requires you to physically touch the target. You use your unarmed reach to determine whether you can touch the creature. You can usually touch the target automatically, though the spell might specify that the target ...


5

Option 1&3 Unlimited Non-combat spells for merely a Cha Save? I could go into great detail on specific spells that would be problematic (Wish is now a ritual spell!)...but ultimately the issue here is that the only restriction that prevents players from spamming these rituals (assuming they have 10 minutes to do it which, in my experience, is not at all ...


5

Misty step learned through the Fey Touched feat does not have to be prepared. The relevant part of the description of the Fey Touched feat says (TCoE, p. 179): You can also cast these spells using spell slots you have of the appropriate level. The spells’ spellcasting ability is the ability increased by this feat. We expect this feature to work the same ...


5

As written, yes it does. The “that deals piercing damage” qualifier applies to the “attack,” not to the individual “one of the attack’s damage dice” that you choose to reroll, so you can choose a die that represents non-piercing damage. (Extra damage dice due to a critical hit would generally be the same type of damage as the initial hit, so those should be ...


5

In addition to what KRyan points out in his fine answer, Exalted Feats have certain restrictions that should bar you from swapping out vows using the Chameleon’s Bonus Feat ability. Only intelligent characters of good alignment and the highest moral standards can acquire exalted feats, and only as a gift from powerful agents of good—deities, celestials, or ...


5

Nothing about Deadly Agility says anything about applying only to melee attacks, so yes, ranged attacks with a light weapon, e.g. by throwing it, would still benefit. You’re wielding a light weapon, you make a successful (ranged, in this case) attack with it, you get to use Dexterity instead of Strength on the damage roll.


4

Ultimately, the errata clarifies Snap Kick so we don’t have to worry about this any more. With the errata, the feat’s benefit reads: Whenever you initiate a strike or use the attack or full attack action, you may take a −2 penalty to attacks made this round gain an additional attack at your highest attack bonus (the −2 applies to this attack as well). This ...


3

No, it does not (unless it requires concentration). Spells do what they do -- or in this case, feats do what they do. The Mage Slayer feat lets you make a melee attack against a triggering creature. It does not specify whether you do it after or before the spell resolves (general rules on reactions, to which shield is an explicit exception*, say the reaction ...


2

No, the situation you propose isn't possible. Flensing Slice says: When you hit with both attacks with Double Slice, you flense the target, making it bleed and creating a weak spot. The target takes 1d8 persistent bleed damage per weapon damage die of whichever of the weapons you used that has the most weapon damage dice (maximum 4d8 for a major striking ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible