New answers tagged

0

Seems like you get the damage increase: meaning a bowling/juggling pin would do d8 instead of d6 (as a club). Then you'd increase the size by thee steps, 2d6, 3d6, 4d6. Alternately you'd do 8d6? with a 2H item. Of course, you COULD already do this with a large table and a decent carry capacity (fullback cords+heavy load belt), or say an anvil. Then ...


1

Go ahead and use your guisarme with Defensive Throw On Making a Trip Attack says, in part, "Make an unarmed melee touch attack against your target" (Player's Handbook 158). Further, on Tripping with a Weapon, in part, says, "Some weapons can be used to make trip attacks[, and if you do] you make a melee touch attack with the weapon instead of an unarmed ...


3

It is often said that the knight has five good levels: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 20th. Basically nothing in the class from 5th to 19th is very good. Loyal beyond death is amazing, but you are going to spend 16 class levels getting it, so keep that in mind. Ultimately, because fighter and knight are so similar, this question about a fighter tank is very good ...


11

You need to find a written source As per the Ritual Caster feat's description (PHB, p. 169; emphasis mine): If you come across a spell in written form, such as a magical spell scroll or a wizard’s spellbook, you might be able to add it to your ritual book. The spell must be on the spell list for the class you chose, the spell’s level can be no higher ...


3

It’s ambiguous, and unfortunately, I would say the stronger case can be made for “no.” First, some rules quotes: Touch spells in combat In the same round that you cast the spell [that has a range of touch], you may also touch (or attempt to touch) the target. You may take your move before casting the spell, after touching the target, or between casting ...


2

Probably not, no. Metamagic feats frequently say “you can” do something special with a spell, whether that’s change its type of energy damage, change its range, or increase its area. Saying “you can” typically means “you don’t have to,” however in the case of metamagic feats, the choice whether or not to do so happens when you choose to use the metamagic ...


3

There are no feats that I'm aware of in official or officially licensed products that specifically allow one or more tentacles to be treated like hands for the purposes of wielding weapons. In fact, only a (ahem) handful of feats broach the topic of tentacles—the most interesting likely being the feat Extended Reach (Savage Species 34). In short, feats are ...


-1

The other answers offer some options, but I'd like to offer another option. Bear in mind that the below uses content from Fiendish Codex I and is to some considered cheese.... Dark Chaos Shuffle This is considered a pretty simple way of getting rid of feats gained from class features or other sources that are unwanted. The first is to find someone who can ...


0

The are several methods of changing feats after the fact. The Retraining rules from Players Handbook II allow you to replace feats after the fact. The general Retraining rules start on p.191, the feat retraining rules are found on p.193. The psionic power Psychic Reformation allows one to retroactively select anew feats, spells, skills, and powers taken ...


13

You cannot perform somatic components if you are restrained, if your hands are full, or if your armor gets in the way. Without somatic components, you can keep your hands full and ignore any arcane spell failure on your armor, and restraining you will not prevent your magic. Plus, you don’t have to move your arms or hands around to cast your mysteries—even ...


1

You can cast spell even if tied or otherwise restrained.


4

You may not have to if the DM'll let you retcon just a little Unearthed Arcana on Monk Variant: Fighting Styles, in part, says A monk can abandon her fighting style by selecting a different bonus feat at 2nd or 6th level; however, if she does so, she loses the bonus on skill checks gained at 1st level and never gains the bonus ability of the fighting ...


5

You cannot. From the Player's Handbook (Page 195): When you take the Attack action and attack with a light melee weapon that you’re holding in one hand, you can use a bonus action to attack with a different light melee weapon that you’re holding in the other hand. Emphasis mine. You cannot wield a two-handed weapon in one hand, therefore you do not meet ...


25

You need to be holding both weapons when you Attack in order to use Two-Weapon Fighting - and attacking with a greatsword requires both hands. You have the Dual Wielder feat, so it doesn't matter that neither weapon is light. So far so good, however: The Two-Weapon Fighting rules state: When you take the Attack action and attack with a light melee ...


2

You have to make a trip attempt unarmed, or with a trip weapon, but the follow up attack from Improved Trip states If you trip an opponent in melee combat, you immediately get a melee attack against that opponent as if you hadn’t used your attack for the trip attempt. Ultimately, it's up to your DM, since it's a bit unclear, but the language seems to ...


18

This will not make the chain you're looking for. While the movement from Dissonant Whispers does provoke opportunity attacks, and War Caster permits Dissonant Whispers to be cast in lieu of an opportunity attack, all of this is limited by the target's action economy: On a failed save, it takes 3d6 psychic damage and must immediately use its reaction, if ...


3

A creature with Eldritch Heritage gains bloodline abilities from other sources normally In context, the benefit of the feat Eldritch Heritage, in part, says, "You gain the first-level bloodline power for the selected bloodline. For purposes of using that power, treat your sorcerer level as equal to your character level –2, even if you have levels in ...


1

About a year ago my group went down a similar road and have been using our solution since then. We started from the same point as this question with thoughts of house ruling changes to the Shield Master feat but eventually settled on adding a new "small shield" item as a solution. So far it seems to be well balanced but it really hasn't been tested as much ...


10

Your modification actually changes two things I'd be careful about changing more than one feature at a time. By also changing two weapon fighting, you are not just changing this feat but also a core game feature. By removing the light restriction, you are offering the benefit of two feats for the price of one. (Or one and a half, since your shield's ...


2

It reduces player choice by diminishing the attractiveness of other options As NautArch points out, making the changes you specify essentially allows a player to have her cake and eat it, too. It creates a clearly optimal character build choice that diminishes the choices for players. That is, Even if you believe that the benefit is minimal, melee ...


14

It's probably overpowered The thing with shields is that they add a big boost to AC at the expense of increased damage. Usually the shield prevents you from holding two-handed weapons which have the bigger damage die - or prevent you from holding a second weapon for two weapon fighting. Turning that into another attack option skews this to something ...


24

No, probably not unbalanced The rule on Improvised Weapons states in part: Often, an improvised weapon is similar to an actual weapon and can be treated as such. For example, a table leg is akin to a club. At the DM's option, a character proficient with a weapon can use a similar object as if it were that weapon and use his or her proficiency bonus. ...


7

This would lead to extra min-maxing, and can be slightly overpowered. The balance of "half" feats assumes that if one feat grants a special ability and +1 to an ability score, and that this costs the same as +1 to two ability scores, that we can mathematically reduce the value of special ability to +1 to an ability score, or half a feat. However, this ...


12

Generally, this should be fine, but is strong. You're speeding up the rate at which characters can get certain features and allow them to really spread out their utility. A Warlock could get up to heavy armor at level 4 (level 1 with a variant human) by taking the half feats for moderately armored and heavily armored (which could be countered by not ...


2

It depends on the campaign and the feats Many campaigns are very much combat focused, so combining half-feats like this for roleplay focused feats seems like a reasonable house rule. Merging the non-ASI bits of Actor and Keen Mind seem like a very cool and fun pairing to increase the non-combat utility of a character. However, if your campaign is heavy on ...


2

The Dual Strike option of the Weapon Trick combat feat says: Additional Prerequisite(s): Double Slice, Improved Vital Strike As a standard action, you can make two attacks, one with each weapon you’re wielding, applying the normal penalties for two-weapon fighting to each. If you're considering options other than feats, the Two-Weapon Warrior ...


26

A spell's verbal, somatic, and material components are necessary but not sufficient The rules have this to say on spell components (emphasis added): A spell's components are the physical requirements you must meet in order to cast it. Each spell's description indicates whether it requires verbal (V), somatic (S), or material (M) components. If you can't ...


12

No. The components you supply at the time of casting are but a fraction of what it takes to produce a spell effect—most of what’s needed occurs during preparation. The actual casting is just the finishing touches necessary to trigger the spell. (Classes that always know certain spells, without preparation, such as the sorcerer, basically have the spell ...


7

No As the the Sage Advice Compendium ruling states: If you have spell slots, can you use them to cast the 1st-level spell you learn with the Magic Initiate feat? Yes, but only if the class you pick for the feat is one of your classes. The fact that the same spell appears on your druid spell list doesn't change that. You can still prepare and cast ...


4

Normally, yes, because they have to unroll the scroll. To cast a spell from a scroll, you must read it. A scroll is usually stored rolled up to protect it from damage, so you would first need to unroll it (after taking it out of the scroll case if it's in one). Normally this would require using your hand, though there are alternatives, such as having ...


2

Short answer: yes. The description for a Spell Scroll includes the following line: If the spell is on your class’s spell list, you can read the scroll and cast its spell without providing any material components. Note that it specifically mentions material components but does not mention verbal or somatic components. The entry on somatic components ...


8

Split Ray doesn't have a wait-and-see option The final part of the benefit of feat Split Ray says that "all rays must be aimed at targets within 30 feet of each other and fired simultaneously" (Complete Arcane 83 and emphasis mine). Thus a caster that casts a ray spell modified by the feat Split Ray picks the targets of his rays then launches all the rays ...


2

This feat is completely useless to warforged The prohibition on never adding proficiency more than once is absolute: Your proficiency bonus can’t be added to a single die roll or other number more than once.


16

RAW, they don't stack From the basic rules on proficiency bonus (emphasis mine): Your proficiency bonus can’t be added to a single die roll or other number more than once. In this case, the number would be your AC for this attack. So, a warforged benefiting from Integrated Protection and using one of the modes that already add your proficiency bonus to ...


-2

By rules as written, this is technically legit. A bow is a ranged weapon. Weapons do not change what they are just because they are used in new and more interesting ways. Indeed, even thrown weapons, when thrown, count as melee weapons being used to make ranged attacks. (Are weapons with the "Thrown" property considered a "Ranged Weapon&...


0

Polearm Master can use the monk damage die. The PHB states that the monk damage die can replace the damage die of an unarmed strike or a monk weapon - and with polearm master you are still using a monk weapon to make the bonus attack. It doesn't increase your damage in any shape or form. By the time your damage die increases you can either do 1d6+dex ...


30

The hostile creature’s movement doesn't provoke an opportunity attack from you, so your War Caster feat isn't triggered. The War Caster feat (PHB 170) says: When a hostile creature’s movement provokes an opportunity attack from you, you can use your reaction to cast a spell at the creature, rather than making an opportunity attack. The spell must ...


4

Based on the specific parameters you've given, you're better off with the -5/+10 attack, period. Since the -5/+10 attack option given by the Great Weapon Master feat requires the use of a heavy weapon, I ran the numbers with the highest-damaging and lowest-damaging heavy weapons as boundary conditions (greatsword/maul and glaive/halberd/pike, respectively). ...


8

Here's an example anydice program which calculates the difference between the two styles of attack for a combatant using a glaive: function: attack ATTACK:n AMOD:n AC:n DMG:d CRIT:d { if ATTACK = 20 { result: DMG + CRIT } if ATTACK + AMOD >= AC { result: DMG } result: 0 } output [attack 1@2d20 10 16 1d10+13 1d10] named "Glaive normal" output [...


5

The Ritual Caster feat gives you a ritual book, but a ritual book does not give you the feat You should note that the Ritual Caster spell specifically says When you choose this feat, you acquire a ritual book... In other words, the assumed rule is that taking the feat gives you the book. However, if your DM has decided that they don't want it to be that ...


4

Acquiring a ritual book does not mean anyone automatically receive the feat, just as acquiring a book about nuclear does not automatically make you a nuclear scientist. Choosing Ritual Caster feat means you acquire the ability to cast spells on a ritual book, even if you normally cannot cast spell as ritual, or even if you cannot cast spell at all. Of ...


3

The penalty from Combat Expertise applies to all attacks for 1 round starting when the standard attack action or full attack action is taken Because the benefit of the feat Combat Expertise (Player's Handbook 92) applies when the standard attack or full attack action is taken—not, in the latter case, when each iterative attack during the full attack is made—...


24

Flame Blade cannot be used with Booming Blade Although diegetically the Flame Blade spell gives you a flaming weapon, you cannot use it for ordinary weapon attacks like what Booming Blade requires. The Flame Blade spell only gives you the ability to make Melee Spell Attacks with your action, dealing the amount of damage specified by the spell. You evoke ...


1

Yes, Combat Expertise applies its penalty to all attacks Well, you are correct that the penalty applies to all attacks: The changes to attack rolls and Armor Class last until your next action.[1] (Combat Expertise, footnote mine) If you have a BAB of +6/−1, and no other bonuses,2 and you use Combat Expertise with a penalty of −3, you would gain +3 AC ...


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