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91

There are ways to prevent easy flight -- Strong Wind (DMG p.110) is the most obvious -- but maybe the more important response to your question is to ask: Why does flying need to be countered or prevented? Early-access flight isn't unique to aarakocra. Many spellcasters can cast Levitate at 3rd level and Fly by 5th, and Druids can wildshape into birds at ...


46

You do not have to land to avoid falling under most circumstances There is no mention of this in the SRD entry about flying movement, which only states the following about flight and falling: If a flying creature is knocked prone, has its speed reduced to 0, or is otherwise deprived of the ability to move, the creature falls, unless it has the ability to ...


39

Yes, so long as you can see it The description of misty step (PHB, pg. 260) says: Briefly surrounded by silvery mist, you teleport up to 30 feet to an unoccupied space that you can see. So long as you can see the point in the air that you wish to teleport to (and it's no more than 30 feet away from you) you should be able to teleport up to it, and your ...


38

Anyone can Misty Step into midair. Misty step just says: Briefly surrounded by silvery mist, you teleport up to 30 feet to an unoccupied space that you can see. Nothing in the spell says that space has to be on the ground.


36

I would say no. The PHB on page 195 specifically states: you don't provoke attacks of opportunity when someone or something moves you without using your movement, action, or reaction. Under the Beast Master archetype on page 93 it says: You can command the beast where to move on your turn (no action required). Since the beast counts as something ...


34

While it may not be "game breaking", it is unbalancing enough that it is disallowed for Adventurers League play (same as the Aarakocra PC race, which also grants flight): All sidebars and optional rules in the Sword Coast Adventurer’s Guide are legal for D&D Adventurers League play with the exceptions noted below. The following rules options are ...


32

Such an effect is both too powerful in terms of usual problems with flying characters, and too vulnerable to easy loss. Both of these things make it a headache to DM for, and not worth considering The problems with early at-will flight in terms of power are spelled out elsewhere, but in brief: Easy way to avoid melee combat for ranged characters. Most ...


31

Yes Yes, a familiar can carry loads if it can properly grip or support them, including a willing creature if they fall within this weight limit. However, a hawk can only carry 37.5 pounds, as it is a Tiny creature, and thus its carry capacity is halved (PHB 176 'Size and Strength').


30

Yes, it can First of all, a carpet that is animated by animate objects can, in fact, fly: Its speed is 30 feet, if the objects lack legs or other appendages it can use for locomotion, it instead has a flying speed of 30 feet and can hover. A carpet has no appendages to use for locomotion, so it gets a flying speed of 30 feet. Next, how much it can ...


30

Swimming is not flying As far as I am aware, flying is never defined as a game term, which means the word takes its normal English meaning: moving through the air under one's own power. I don't think most people would describe underwater movement as flying (except metaphorically). You can probably "fly" at half speed underwater The rules for swimming ...


29

Your player is correct in that maintaining the wings does not require concentration. If it did, it would say so in the effect description. Once triggered, the wings will exist for 1 minute. Period. Your player is incorrrect in claiming that the wings give him a Hover effect. If a creature has a Fly (Hover) speed, it is explicitly called out in their Stats. ...


29

Flying is a game-changing ability. Game-changers are abilities that drastically expand the character's capabilities, often allowing them to bypass certain types of obstacles completely, like walls, cliffs, traps, and even melee encounters. These are described in the Gamemastery Guide (page 46): Invisibility; Flying (Fly); Teleportation (Teleport); Lie/Evil ...


29

Not everyone in the party can fly. Sure, aarakocra can fly at will, but the rest of the party can't. It might be trivial for that arrakocra to get to the top of a castle via flight, but does that matter when they are leaving behind the four other members of their party? The aarakocra might be able to fly out of a 80 foot deep pit with smooth sides, but the ...


28

Yes, it would be a noticable nerf. Mechanically, having a familiar capable of flight - such as an owl - can indeed be rather useful, especially for scouting purposes - which is one of the main benefits of a familiar, barring RP purposes (RAW, familiars should be unable to carry anything noteworthy, so that won't be an issue). Hence, disallowing flight for ...


27

Here is what flight does: it makes the player character immune to certain types of monsters. For example if the party gets attacked by bears, or wolves, or lions, or tyrannosaurs, your tiefling variant can fly into the air and now the monsters can't hurt him. Usually this is not a huge problem, because the monsters can still hurt the rest of the party, so ...


25

Since nothing about weight is mentioned and the boots give you flying speed equal to your walking speed, I would assume that the regular carrying capacity rules are in effect (page 176 of PHB). You can carry 15 times your strength (including your equipment etc), or push, drag or lift 30 times your own weight. If doing the latter and the thing you move is ...


24

In the 5e Monster Manual, you will notice that some creatures, like air elementals, have the (Hover) attribute. Hover allows a creature to remain in the air while it has a speed of 0. Additionally, as stated in the PHB pg.191: If a flying creature is knocked prone, has its speed reduced to 0, or is otherwise deprived of the ability to move, the creature ...


23

Note: This answer was accurate when originally posted in Feb. 2015. In Dec. 2015, the Pathfinder FAQ was updated with this exchange that says, in part, "Magical flight doesn’t act any differently [from mundane winged flight], even for paralysis, as it [i.e. magical flight] isn’t a purely mental action." Also see this answer. A paralyzed druid in air ...


23

If I were to cast levitate on a prone orc and float him 20 feet into the air - would he still be prone? - Yes Jeremy Crawford has clarified: You can almost always be knocked prone. About the only time it's physically impossible for you to be knocked prone is when you're affixed to something that keeps you upright. and further: Being underwater doesn'...


23

You fall all the way to the ground immediately with no chance to cast anything else You start falling as soon as you start casting levitate You start falling as soon as fly ends, which is the same instant you start casting levitate. Starting to cast one concentration spell instantly ends any other concentration spell you have going. As soon as you ...


22

You can move your normal rate during your turn because you always can and this can be broken up before and after the casting of the spell. This flying movement is additional movement using your bonus action (which implies that you must use your action to cast the spell). It must be taken as a block before or after the spell casting; it can't be split like ...


22

This feature is unbalanced for many campaigns and problematically unconventional Assessing the balance of this feature is difficult as the situational value of flight, the main selling point of this feature, depends heavily on the type of campaign you have. If you have frequent rests, a character with this feature can spend almost all their combat time ...


21

So, first up, let's define exactly what triggers Feather Fall: 1 reaction, which you take when you or a creature within 60 feet of you falls Situation 1: You can't cast Feather Fall as a reaction to being hit - it's a reaction to falling. If damage caused you to go unconscious, causing you to fall, then you can't use Feather ...


20

From http://www.d20pfsrd.com/skills/fly You generally need only make a Fly check when you are attempting a complex maneuver. Without making a check, a flying creature can remain flying at the end of its turn so long as it moves a distance greater than half its speed. It can also turn up to 45 degrees by sacrificing 5 feet of movement, can rise at half ...


20

As written, your player is correct. The rules do not state that he needs an initial foothold. Are you concerned that a level 14 Barbarian has found a way to replicate part of the effects of a level one spell (Feather Fall)? Feather Fall is gained extremely early for Wizards, Sorcerers, and Bards, can be cast several times a day, and affects up to five ...


20

Gliding is not a thing in 5e And in fact, Gliding is just a form of flying (just with less effort). Colloquially, we envision gliding to not take movement, but in 5e Movement is simplified and generalized to mean distance traveled. From the Basic Rules: Your speed determines how far you can move when traveling (“Adventuring”) and fighting (“Combat”) ...


19

can I cast Fly on my horse? It's a creature and so is a valid target. Can it be considered a willing creature? Probably; its willing to let you climb on its back, however, your DM has the final call on this. See Can you make an unwilling creature willing? In other words, what defines “willing”? If so, will I be able to ride it while flying? Sure, ...


19

Do not try to get rid of flight as option. many spells, racial or class abilities can grant flying. If you start doing it you'll basically never be able to stop placing one restriction after another. What you should look into is what type of hazards, enemies there might be in the skies above? What kind of monsters, enemies might notice a single flying ...


18

Xanather's Guide to Everything now clarifies this in two ways. Firstly, it provides an explicit explanation of the RAW and provides an optional rule for long falls. RAW - Immediate fall & immediate damage The rule for falling assumes that a creature immediately drops the entire distance when it falls. (XGtE) So by standard rules the answer to your ...


18

While not explicitly given as an example by the RAW, I see no reason why this wouldn't work. That's the whole point of the 'Ready' Action (PHB 193). First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your speed in response to ...


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