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Some locales have a card shop or or game shop with space available, or even expressly devoted for the purpose. They might already have active gaming groups; you might be expected to rent out the space especially if your group is invite only. Rental goes to help support the business in any case. Example places that I have been to: Bigger Better Games Fremont,...


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Game stores are good because you usually have other people around playing games too, it just makes a fun atmosphere, and you can do some shopping before or after your game! I've seen people reserve conference rooms in the local library to play as well, but you will have to be relatively quiet with your celebrations, as well as things like dice rolls. ...


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Since the question seems to be more about HOW to choose, not what the possible choices are, let me take a stab: Usually, in my experience, your choices are limited to about 2... if you're lucky, so this doesn't usually come up very often. But, if you miraculously have a cornucopia of choices, here's my proposed priorities: Like any party venue, pick a ...


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To Cubic's excellent answer, I would also add: I know a few different locations that fit those criteria: An office – If any of the players works at an office, the owner may be fine allowing you to use the space after hours as long as you don't leave a mess. For quite a while I ran Friday night games out of the meeting room in the office where I worked. A ...


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Tabletop games tend to take quite a long time (several hours per session usually), can be quite noisy (it's quite hard to be quiet with 4-6 people talking, play-acting and throwing dice) and often involve the use of small, light objects (character sheets, dice, sometimes playing cards etc). Most of the time, several of these things are made of paper. ...


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