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6

One From the rules for Grab - Using Grab extends the duration of the monster's Grab until the end of its next turn for all creatures grabbed by it.


2

A character […] can use its reaction to make an opportunity attack against it or try to grapple the fish So you can either make an opportunity attack, or grapple. Two separate options. As NautArch notes, this is also a case of "specific beats general", since the rules don't normally allow you to initiate grapple as a reaction. But even in this ...


2

I prefer asking my players what they plan to do I believe Thomas' answer is correct from a RAW standpoint, but it is not how I play. At my tables, I do prefer the players to provide a clear description of both their trigger and their intended action/movement. I've always seen and played Ready to be specific reaction to a specific trigger. It allows everyone ...


0

You have to describe your action as if you were performing it at that time. The only difference between a readied action and an immediately-taken action is when it occurs. The former occurs at a defined trigger, while the latter occurs immediately. The rules for the Ready action state: you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you ...


7

You only have to state which action you intend to take. The rules for the Ready action state: you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your speed in response to it. So if you intend to make an attack, you need only state, "I will take the Attack action in response to the trigger." You do not ...


38

These rules are for that encounter, not general. This is a great example of specific over general! The rules around that encounter for knuckleheads are specific and only relevant for that activity. They don't state anywhere that you can use this option in normal combat or outside of that encounter. So slap a knucklehead and have some good eats.


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