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2

For over a year I have been the DM for a weekly in-person D&D 5e game with up to 13 players (other than me). Most weeks we have 7-10 players running PCs at the table. With that background, here is how I attempt to keep the game fun for everyone involved: Know Your Audience The DM should facilitate a Session 0 (and probably re-facilitate one every few ...


13

Change the game D&D 5e isn't built to support 8 players (or 7, if that includes the DM). You can shoehorn it for a session here or there, but getting a consensus on how to play is going to be nigh impossible, and even if everyone agrees, it's very likely that someone's expectations aren't going to be met. In my experience: 4-5 players is the sweet ...


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You've indicated that most of the problem comes from players arguing over what to do next. I have a technique I use for this: I ask them to vote. We do one round around the table and let everyone say what they think the group should do, and then we do a second round around the table and I ask everyone to vote. If there's a tie, I break the tie myself. ...


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Talk to your DM about re-running Session Zero The good news is that you all understand more what you want out of the game, the bad news is that there are some differences causing issues. The best thing to do at this point is to try and all get on the same page. Talk to the DM about your concerns and recommend running a session zero. Make sure everyone is ...


3

The stated question: The problem with the situation you describe is that the two characters were operating in a non-combat context, where issues like Initiative, turns, and simultaneous activity in a span of time don't apply. There is no way to ready an Action in a context where Actions and Reactions aren't operative. A DM can try to shoehorn in some ...


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Out of character discussion Sadly enough, this kind of thing can realistically only be resolved by talking about it out of character with the players, because the realistic in-character resolution simply isn't possible. It'll result in an escalating train of readied actions until one of the two players gets their way. The realistic in-character way of ...


0

You've given the answer to some extend yourself: The Cleric can announce that she's readying an action to perform if the Warlock acts. The Cleric's player could do this semi-covertly by passing a note to the GM. However, it should be noted that both as players and GM, you are moving onto thin ice there, because it basically amounts to PvP. Based on the ...


3

Regarding the DM's motives (just or unjust). Maybe DM expects to be but wasn't consulted that it was an evil campaign. Possibly some plot is wasted if the party simply wants to kill guards and rob people. To each their own and sounds like you were doing interesting evil stuff. If the difference in alignment is not enjoyed, it matters who caused this. Maybe ...


2

character has [the power to] silence a player for 15 minutes of talking in real-time. That role-play is very broken. It is unfortunate that the concept of silencing a character would silence the player - the player is not the character. My point is: How do I tell the DM and Hannah that ... and how to fix the favoritism issue so everyone is treated ...


2

It seems like three conversations should take place. A Conversation Between the Group and the DM (Minus Hannah) This conversation should be a reflection on the items that have been dropped, found, or added to the game and the fairness of them. It's possible that in the case of the sword, the DM made a mistake when creating the item or implementing it if ...


1

As others here commented you could try to solve this meta-game: point it out on the spot. However, I have two suggestions to solve in-game: Exchange the characters: Sometimes, it is possible to exchange the players on each character. I mean, rotate the characters in the same group, showing that it's a bit overpowered. Rotate the strategies on the adventure:...


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Edit: In light of the info added to the Q, there may be hope for the group yet. Other answers cover that angle enough so I won't edit the answer below. I don't think this is the answer you want to hear, but in my opinion there is no way to fix this. Those darts are such a bad, horrifying idea, that it shows the DM is simply out of their league trying to be ...


62

This problem must be solved out-of-game The DM showing favouritism towards a specific player and the expense of everyone else's fun is not a problem with the narrative, it's a problem with the social contract. I would recommend not plotting to kill her character as this would likely just provoke massive social fallout. Instead, there are a few things I'd ...


90

I would honestly just leave What you're describing sounds like not just favoritism but bullying. The GM has granted Hannah the power to literally tell you to shut up for fifteen minutes --- that's a blatant abuse of their position. Being a GM is about running the game in an enjoyable manner to those present (including themselves), not about being a power-...


3

I would encourage you to talk to your DM about creating space for player skill to be separated from character skill. Ability scores and character skills are in place to help facilitate all of this. The approach I use as a DM is imagining what players say and do as the things their characters think they are saying and doing. So if the player of the 8 ...


-2

There are already some great answers here. Here's something I use when I build any sort of team, or group. Ask each person to tell you their Myers-Briggs (if they know it)(if they don't know it, have them go to this link for a free Myers-Briggs test. Basically the first letter tells you right away what someone tends to be as far as an extrovert/introvert. ...


5

One approach that worked at my table was to roll the dice first, then role play the outcome. So the Paladin player (who was less of a role-player / ham) would perhaps roll well, and say "I make a rousing speech, like Churchill / Buzz Lightear, about how we will fight on, never surrender nor give up." The less than charismatic fighter played by the ...


4

If you feel you're caught off guard when the DM asks you to deliver an inspirational, intimidating, or persuasive speech, one option is to prepare vocabulary and/or canned speeches prior to the game session. Write up short blurbs on note cards, filled with flowery language straight out of Tolkien or Shakespeare. You can leave out specific names of ...


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Point 1: Talk to your group Largely, this is an issue that ought to be brought up with your GM and group, the other answers touch on this well. Point 2: Try to change your approach to the way you describe what your character does As a fellow introvert, I understand not feeling entirely comfortable with speaking in character. That said, there is ...


16

Talk with your group about passive and active role-play. Enforce dice checks and award bonuses (like D&D's Inspiration) for good role-play, not only for good acting. Role-playing isn't acting. Your friend is a good actor (active role-play) in a poorly-social character. His PC imagines in his head grand speeches and the sort, but his PC should roll his ...


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I ran into this when playing Exalted My PC was the "Socialite" (Merchant-Prince), with maxed Charisma and plenty of Social Skills. I am not that Social, and wished to play a Charismatic PC. Another PC was a Warrior, with minimal Social Skills (not a complete klutz, but just not in my league, numbers-wise). The player is well-known as a good Talker. I ...


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