16

Talk to your DM about re-running Session Zero The good news is that you all understand more what you want out of the game, the bad news is that there are some differences causing issues. The best thing to do at this point is to try and all get on the same page. Talk to the DM about your concerns and recommend running a session zero. Make sure everyone is ...


14

It's probably okay to leave the encounter as it is There's a couple of ways to approach this question, I'll start with a crude estimation and then dial in from there. In terms of CR Goblins are CR ¼ creatures, worth 25XP each. Four of them add together to 100XP total, which we then multiply using the guide in the Dungeon Master's Guide (pages 82-83) by ...


13

Change the game D&D 5e isn't built to support 8 players (or 7, if that includes the DM). You can shoehorn it for a session here or there, but getting a consensus on how to play is going to be nigh impossible, and even if everyone agrees, it's very likely that someone's expectations aren't going to be met. In my experience: 4-5 players is the sweet ...


9

You've indicated that most of the problem comes from players arguing over what to do next. I have a technique I use for this: I ask them to vote. We do one round around the table and let everyone say what they think the group should do, and then we do a second round around the table and I ask everyone to vote. If there's a tie, I break the tie myself. ...


7

Ideas to not massacre a small party. Without knowing the full details (such as if the players will change between sessions) there are a few options: As the DM you can give opponents a "handicap" for their attack and damages, or scale the numbers of opponents, to make things a bit easier until the characters are a bit more skilled or others join the party. ...


6

There are a few techniques that I've tried myself which have been effective for scaling combat challenges up or down, and they should apply to series of encounters just as well. 1. Adjust the number of enemies in combat The action economy is a big deal, especially when enemy groups mix types of enemy to allow more possible combinations of actions the enemy ...


6

While not stated explicitly, the norm still appears to be 5 players. However there are useful suggestions on the internet for balancing the module for different numbers of players. One such example is by a reddit poster who seems to have prepared explicit adjustments for various encounters. With two players, you can also consider letting each player run a ...


5

My Party of Three Saw Phandelver and Returned Victorious I have nothing but respect for the other answers, but the specific question seems to be at least partly about the ease or necessity of adjusting not a basic adventure but the basic adventure from the starter set, namely the Lost Mine of Phandelver. The particular advantage of this module is that it ...


3

Playtest your players' party in the encounters you plan, develop variants on enemy stats and tactics, and give your players access to appropriate consumables. There is no perfect way to design balanced encounters (at least, not that I've encountered)-- things like calculating CR are imprecise at best, and rely on many assumptions which you may not be aware ...


3

This question was asked on the Subreddit, and apparently it breaks the Stress economy. Each PC gets 9 stress before they have to leave the score (trauma -out). So at 5 PCs that 45 stress for the table. With 45 stress to spend on one score most things that cost stress only cost 1-3 stress (aside from a bad resistance roll or a few other odds and ends). ...


2

For over a year I have been the DM for a weekly in-person D&D 5e game with up to 13 players (other than me). Most weeks we have 7-10 players running PCs at the table. With that background, here is how I attempt to keep the game fun for everyone involved: Know Your Audience The DM should facilitate a Session 0 (and probably re-facilitate one every few ...


2

Dungeon Master's Guide (DMG) It offers a section dedicated to Creating A Combat Encounter, pg. 81. The process is simple: Determine each character's XP treshold from the table in the book. Higher level means more XP treshold. Calculate the party's XP treshold. Total up the all the monsters' XP in an encounter. Adjust the total with the multiplier from the ...


1

Warning to players - this answer is spoiler-y. I just went through White Plume Mountain as a player. We had a party of four, and we nearly got TPKed several times. Honestly, it's going to be difficult. You're going to want to be very clear when they are in a room where it is safe for them to have a short rest, because they're going to have to burn through ...


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