Hot answers tagged

160

You need not change anything about the default setting in order to have people "left out" of the benefits of clerical magic. I don't think that clerical spellcasting is as easy to come by as you make it out to be. In other words: you can easily have your harsh and gritty world. In what follows I'll always lean toward the more-utopian interpretation ...


97

Does the Medicine skill have hidden uses you don't know about? Doesn't every skill? Remember that skills are abstractions of both knowledge, expertise and ability. So in addition to the mechanical benefits (that of stabilizing a character when a healing kit isn't available), it also has other benefits. Things that would require a medicine check: ...


71

Hit points are a poor abstraction for blood loss Here's the full description of hit points in the Basic Rules, with the most relevant phrases highlighted in bold face: Hit points represent a combination of physical and mental durability, the will to live, and luck. Creatures with more hit points are more difficult to kill. Those with fewer hit points are ...


66

In the several years since 5E has been out, I've played at a lot of tables which often do not have a cleric — or any dedicated healer. From this, I think that you really want the healing role covered, but it doesn't have to be by a cleric or paladin. Without healing magic, fights are a lot more dangerous, and bad luck can really compound without any ...


57

A few folks have mentioned to me that Mike Mearls has stated elsewhere that it's an oversight in the text, and the intent is that a level 1 character should recover 1 hit die. Seems likely errata-fodder. @MrMattFree : Hit dice question! Basic rules say you get half your HD back at a long rest but doesn't say round up. What does a 1st lvl do? @mikemearls : ...


56

There is no visible effect upon casting Healing Word Healing word has no language in the spell description that would suggest a visible effect upon casting. In contrast, a spell like Fireball (PHB, 241) states: A bright streak flashes from your pointing finger to a point you choose within range... Audio recognition However, there is a Verbal Component ...


50

You cannot choose to abstain from a potion effect Potion of Healing states: You regain hit points when you drink this potion. In that language, there is no choice. Just cause and effect. You drink the potion, you regain hitpoints. If you had a choice about potion effects, then the Potion of Poison would hold no threat. This concoction[potion of poison] ...


48

If the Cleric casts Mass Healing Word, targeting each of the 4 party members, how many times would the Cleric gain HP equal to 2 + Spell Level? I would argue only once because the trigger for Blessed Healer is "When you cast a spell...". You only cast one spell, so you'd only get healed once. Taken further, would the Blessed Healer effect be prevented if ...


45

If a Wraith reduces your maximum HP to zero, you die The explanation you've been given seems to be a little mixed up - it's not that necrotic damage inherently cannot be healed, but that the Wraith's attack deals necrotic damage and also has a secondary effect which can reduce your HP maximum until your next long rest: Life Drain. Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to ...


45

Nope, this is no longer the case! Spells (and all features etc) do only what they say they do. Cure wounds very specifically says: This spell has no effect on undead or constructs So in fact it does nothing to undead at all. Neither heal nor harm. Specifically, there is no concept of healing "positive energy" and harmful "negative energy", and so no ...


44

Contextually, Bob's correct If the campaign is a series of tombs of horrors, then that ring of cure light wounds is an item beyond price. If the party can't leave the dungeon to resupply and can't get down to one encounter per day (i.e. the so-called 15-minute workday) via spells1, that ring of cure light wounds is a literal lifesaver. In other words, if ...


43

The Cure Wounds spell would have restored hit points and consciousness to the Rogue. A dying creature isn't prevented from regaining hit points in any way. In fact, on page 197 of the PHB, under the Falling Unconscious section: This unconsciousness ends if you regain any hit points. Stabilizing is an entirely different process, which does not immediately ...


43

So the loss of body parts is awkward at best in 3.5, since the rules never describe any process by which it might happen or what it means when it does. Because the system doesn’t get into it, it doesn’t give a whole lot of options for dealing with it. The regenerate spell can definitely fix a lost body part. It is one of only two references to the idea that ...


42

According to Jeremy Crawford, yes Per a tweet from Jeremy Crawford, lead designer of the game, the answer is yes. The benefit of the Survivor feature happens at the start of each of your turns, whether those turns are inside or outside combat. #DnD - @JeremyECrawford However, whereas historically his tweets were considered to be official rulings according ...


41

You can't be insane.... if you don't have a brain! One of the methods I prefer to utilize to curing madness involves the following steps: Attack party member until rendering them unconscious. Restrain party member on sturdy table with chains, shackles and ropes. Have Igor fetch THE CAGE. Release Intellect Devourer (it's very important to have this step ...


41

No, because the Ready Action requires you to cast the spell as normal and then hold it, releasing it with your reaction later. You are using your action to cast the spell on your turn. PHB pg. 193 under Ready, emphasis mine: When you ready a spell, you cast it as normal but hold its energy, which you release with your reaction when the trigger occurs. ...


39

Spells such as Regenerate and Heroes' Feast (and probably others that I've missed, too) can heal undead, however I don't think that that's the real answer here. The first answer is that undead can rest, just like anyone else. Crawford tweeted on this: https://www.sageadvice.eu/2014/09/19/undead-short-rest/ It doesn't mention long rests, but I think it's ...


39

From the DMG 260: A calm emotions spell can suppress the effects of madness, while a lesser restoration spell can rid a character of a short-term or long-term madness. Depending on the source of the madness, remove curse or dispel evil might also prove effective. A greater restoration spell or more powerful magic is required to rid a character of ...


38

True Clerics are rare The Player's Handbook points out that not all a deity's clergy are "clerics" who have magical healing powers. Not every acolyte or officiant at a temple or shrine is a cleric...True clerics are rare in most hierarchies. (Divine Agents, PH, p. 56) "Magic and strength of arms" (also PH 56) are not available to every devotee of a ...


37

The Fighter must wait until round 3 During round two in your scenario, when the Cleric heals the Fighter, the Fighter's turn has already ended for that round, so they would need to wait until the next round to take another turn. The rules for death saving throws state the the saving throw is made at the start of the dying creature's turn (the Fighter, in ...


36

Non-disease illnesses are not modeled in the rules The mechanics of D&D are mainly focused around combat, exploration, and social interaction, not to mention magic. While infectious diseases are covered in the DMG Chapter 8, as far as I can tell there is no attempt in the rules to model any kind of illness other than that caused by disease or magical ...


35

Sadly the rules on curing disease do not seem to be organized in a single section of any of the rule books. Here are all the options I can find: Spells Lesser Restoration (2nd level) can end 1 disease afflicting the target Raise Dead (5th level, 500gp consumed material component) cures non-magical diseases that afflicted the deceased at the time of its death....


35

No, this way you just save yourself Your idea only works if NPCS and players are only fighting because...well... they're fighting. Realistically, there's something both sides are trying to accomplish, else they wouldn't be fighting in the first place. Now your plan is to cast a spell, run away, then return later to bring the party back up to their feet to ...


34

Erin - Kind Of This part of what Erin said is right: Erin thinks that the DMG guidelines are flexible and we should consider the cost of the Ring of Cure Light Wounds in context of other, existing magic items. DMG p. 282 says something pretty similar in the bottom right corner (SRD version): Not all items adhere to these formulas directly. The reasons for ...


34

By RAW, you may not be able to administer a goodberry - by RAI, you most certainly can A very strict RAW reading would conclude that in order to gain the benefit of a goodberry, the consuming character must be able to use their action to consume it. However, as it happens, this question has been asked of Jeremy Crawford via twitter (whose tweets were, at the ...


33

There are two techniques that can go 90% of the way to making playing-initiated retreats like this not boring or tedious. "Time passes" Use your role as DM to control the passage of time. Skip the uneventful parts. Do you know that nothing will inconvenience them on the way out of the dungeon? Narrate to skip ahead then. You backtrack through the halls ...


33

The problem you have encountered was once known as the 15-minute workday. Since health, spells, etc are all things that are regained over time, the safest strategy is usually to do one fight, then back off to a safe distance and regenerate to full power before tackling the next challenge. SevenSidedDie wisely suggests ensuring that the world does not wait ...


33

There is nearly-zero return on investment in Heal This answer is all about cost–benefit analysis. That is, how much good does Heal do you, compared to what costs you have to pay to get those benefits. For the most part, Heal costs skill points, which are not very valuable, but they are strictly limited and almost every character wishes they had substantially ...


33

The rules read When an article of magic clothing or jewelry is discovered, most of the time size shouldn’t be an issue. Many magic garments are made to be easily adjustable, or they adjust themselves magically to the wearer. Size should not keep characters of various kinds from using magic items. There may be rare exceptions, especially with racial specific ...


33

Take a look at the full detail of what it actually says (my emphasis): This spell closes all mortal wounds, but it doesn’t restore missing body parts. If the creature is lacking body parts or organs integral for its survival—its head, for instance—the spell automatically fails. It doesn't matter if the organs are shattered, splattered or ground to ...


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