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45

If a Wraith reduces your maximum HP to zero, you die The explanation you've been given seems to be a little mixed up - it's not that necrotic damage inherently cannot be healed, but that the Wraith's attack deals necrotic damage and also has a secondary effect which can reduce your HP maximum until your next long rest: Life Drain. Melee Weapon Attack: +6 ...


40

According to Jeremy Crawford, yes Per a tweet from Jeremy Crawford, lead designer of the game, the answer is yes. The benefit of the Survivor feature happens at the start of each of your turns, whether those turns are inside or outside combat. #DnD - @JeremyECrawford However, whereas historically his tweets were considered to be official rulings ...


36

Non-disease illnesses are not modeled in the rules The mechanics of D&D are mainly focused around combat, exploration, and social interaction, not to mention magic. While infectious diseases are covered in the DMG Chapter 8, as far as I can tell there is no attempt in the rules to model any kind of illness other than that caused by disease or magical ...


19

No As an action, you can spend one use of a healer’s kit to tend to a creature and restore 1d6 + 4 hit points to it, plus additional hit points equal to the creature’s maximum number of Hit Dice. The creature can’t regain hit points from this feat again until it finishes a short or long rest. Nowhere does it mention that the target needs to be immobile ...


19

Yes, healing is unaffected by temporary hit points When you have Temporary Hit Points nothing prevents you from healing your actual hit points. The rules for temporary hit points say (emphasis mine): Healing can't restore temporary hit points, and they can't be added together. [...] If you have 0 hit points, receiving temporary hit points doesn't ...


19

Regenerate for this DM I took a few minutes to learn about strokes here, and the general gist is that due to a combination of ruptured/blocked blood vessels a bunch of brain cells die. This progressing to full death depends on how far it gets, but regardless the creature in question effectively has severed body parts by virtue of brain cells being dead and ...


17

No Change Shape: ... In a new form, the deva retains its game Statistics and ability to speak, but its [things that are not hp] are replaced by those of the new form, ... Hit points are retained.


16

Necrotic damage does not reduce your max HP You are confusing things. Necrotic damage is just a type of damage. An axe deals slashing damage, a fireball deals fire damage and some things deal necrotic damage. None of these damage types do anything other than determine vulnerabilities, immunities and resistances. What's special here is that your character ...


10

You could treat the stroke symptoms as a custom lingering injury The DMG Chapter 9 includes a variant rule called Lingering Injuries, which includes a table of several such injuries. Most of the injuries have some mechanical detriment based on the nature of the injury. In addition, each injury specifies a custom condition for healing it. Examples include: ...


9

The patient doesn't need to be immobile Rules do what they say they do. As an action, you can spend one use of a healer’s kit to tend to a creature and restore 1d6 + 4 hit points to it, plus additional hit points equal to the creature’s maximum number of Hit Dice. The creature can’t regain hit points from this feat again until it finishes a short or ...


8

We need to determine what can target and/or interact with plants. Spells and equipment/objects in DnD usually target either creatures or objects. To what category do plants belong has already been discussed here: Are plants creatures or objects. The answer argues that "ordinary" plants are objects. There are competing answers that argue otherwise (Can ...


7

Yes Unless the potion explicitly says that that it requires humanoids, then it doesn't. Here is the text for Potion of Healing: You regain hit points when you drink this potion. The number of hit points depends on the potion’s rarity, as shown in the Potions of Healing table. Whatever its potency, the potion’s red liquid glimmers when agitated. As you ...


7

Temporary hit points do not prevent you from recovering regular hit points The section on "Hit Points" under "Damage and Healing" states: [...] A creature's current hit points (usually just called hit points) can be any number from the creature's hit point maximum down to 0. This number changes frequently as a creature takes damage or receives healing [.....


6

Temporary Hit Points are separate from your normal Hit Points. You can be healed while you possess them. To quote the PHB section on Temporary Hit Points: Temporary hit points aren’t actual hit points; they are a buffer against damage, a pool of hit points that protect you from injury. As a result, when you gain Temporary Hit Points, you're not actually ...


5

The character would die when they hit max HP 0. According to the Monster Manual entry for the Wraith, under its Life Drain action: The target must succeed on a DC 14 Constitution saving throw or its hit point maximum is reduced by an amount equal to the damage taken. This reduction lasts until the target finishes a long rest. The target dies if this ...


5

It's unbalanced The difference between a concious and an unconcious ally during combat is huge. So much so that bringing a creature at 0 HP back to conciousness during combat is an unbalanced effect for a cantrip. Your cantrip can do so an indefinite number of times, which is especially problematic at low levels. In addition to that big problem, there are ...


4

My original answer contained an exploit that no longer exist in the edited question (healing for more than damage dealt), so I am updating my answer to highlight other issues Even if a single casting cannot heal more than the damage dealt, what about multiple castings? Say the paladin takes 4 points of damage this round. Since the spell can only heal for ...


4

Four Aasimar walk into a tavern... Because the use of spells are out, there isn't too much going on. I'll quickly go through each of the classes, all of whom get a feat which I'll cover afterwards. I'll also assume everyone have a Charisma modifier of +3 and that noone other than party members are available or relevant to heal. Paladin: All get a pool of ...


4

With all of these, bear in mind that all of the spells mentioned in the question are very weak. Heal is the one really strong healing spell (well, and mass heal), the restoration spells are necessary but not stellar, and the cure spells are just bad. Investing resources for access to them is probably a poor idea, particularly since all of these (heal, again, ...


3

Combining the Arcane Disciple feat ( Complete Divine, p. 79) with a Cleric Domain that grants access to Restoration, like the Renewal domain ( Spell Compendium, p. 279), should do it. You can use the Healing domain for Cure X and Regenerate ( Players Handbook, p. 187 ). Now your greatest problem is finding a deity that supports both domains.


3

There aren't many ways to cure a stroke A stroke, at least usually, would not be cured simply by removing its conditions as strokes have lasting physical effects such as clotting and ruptured blood vessels, which would need to be healed, unless it's a transient ischemic stroke. Additionally a stroke may be caused by a disease but the stroke itself is not a ...


3

In general, access to infinite healing is very rare in D&D 5.0. The problem of infinite healing is that it may trivialize encounters against low-level critters. Normally, a high-level fighter should still be afraid of a horde of 100 rats. Many rats will fail to hit, however little by little they may wear him down and even if he succeeds, force him to ...


2

Lay on Hands can work - as DM, first decide what fits the narrative Technically, the afflictions caused by a stroke can be classified as a disease, so a class ability can be the way to cure this. (Or a spell can, up to you). RL observation: some of the people who I know who have had strokes still have some permanent loss of function, and while others ...


2

This would be the only spell able to bypass Chilling Touch (which shuts down all healing); I can't say I like that. It also brings people up from 0, but since 0 is as low as HP goes, now you have a cantrip which restores people to fighting condition? Or not. because it only undoes damage? I am confused with how this would interact with a downed PC.


2

The Sublime Chord prestige class (Complete arcane, page 60), is pretty much designed explicitly to turn bards into full casters. The classic progression is Bard 10/Sublime Chord 10. This will leave you with 9th level spells by level 19, access to the full bard list, and access to the wizard/sorcerer list for everything about 4th-level spells. It won't ...


2

While ordinary healing spells don't explicitly target plants, it would be on you and the DM to figure something out. What about a restauration spell or an alternative wizard spell? Restauration could remove sicknesses of the plant or mold, a wizard spell could transmute or mend plants. But I suppose something like plant growth makes the most sense. It ...


1

Any undead Cleric can do this. In fact, you can’t not know how to do this as a Cleric. This is actually completely possible. The 3rd level Cleric spell rejuvenative corpse (SpC 172) targets a humanoid that died in the past week and charges their corpse with negative energy. On eating a full meal from that corpse, an undead creature gains fast healing 1 ...


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