16

A Hacker gathers and distributes information by illegitimately posing as an authorized source. This is all a hacker does. Sometimes the hacker impersonates a person of authority in a system, like an admin or a regular user or some such. Often a hacker impersonates routine parts of the system's own processes. Sometimes they do other things. A society is ...


5

I have not tested these within the context of RPGs, but here are a couple suggestions based on a American historical fiction writing class that was focused on class inequalities: Focus on the larger aspect of the inequality in the environment While dialogue is an effective means of conveying the attitudes of the characters, the lower class NPCs are likely ...


5

No, there are no specific supplements for Chronicle of Darkness that deal with the mechanical minutiae of each Dark Eras setting. A list of books in the COFD and NWOD series can be found here: http://www.wodcodex.com/wiki/Books . Happy hunting!


5

The core text of the WW:WW book has been lifted in a huge part, but not wholly (naturally) from the WW:The Apocalypse book. If you have access to that, you'll find a lot of extra information there. You'll also want to check out The Rite of the Opened Caern on p.169 of the WW:WW book (and in WW:TA as well, if you can.) It explains a lot about how Caerns work....


4

An Anecdotal Response I had this same concern when I ran a "Pulp Hero" Hero system game along the same basic principles. One of my players was Jewish and his grandmother was in an internment camp so naturally I wanted to stay as far away from that aspect of WWII as much as possible. I focused on the occult side and the beginning time frame of WWII, ...


4

What you are trying to do is called a "Planspiel" in German. An educational role playing game that involves a conflict. The Planspiel has derived from military simulations, i.e. maneuvers at the green table with decision-making involving also the problem of having to act on incomplete information. The educational Planspiel is focused on decision-making and - ...


3

On achieving immersion: If you can find a movie that mirrors your setting, show a 10–30 minute excerpt of it at character creation to "set the tone". Allow players to specify that things are being done IC or OOC — and allow as many OOC questions as needed. Make it clear that nonsensical actions will be disallowed but not punished. Incentivise ...


3

I've run a great number of political larps. For one-shots, you have to strike a very important balance: giving people enough leads where they never feel they're lost for something to do, and not overwhelming them with too much information. Given your examples were all very short - you could give way more than that. About half a page of total background ...


3

A game suitable for that age level, designed explicitly for educational purposes, is Dangerous Parallel. See if your school can get a copy of that game and use it as a template for how deep to go. I recall that the game went a little deeper than your third level. There is both open information and secret information that only certain players got. The game ...


3

The simplest way to handle it is to consider that yes, all the kingdoms have learned a common tongue as a trade language. This makes sense, especially in a world of magic. It does not, however, make learning the primary languages of each nation unimportant. Think of the modern world: in any given country, you will almost certainly be able to find people with ...


3

It's worth mentioning how two existing D&D campaigns explained the seemingly unlikely scenario of nearly everyone speaking Common. Eberron In the Eberron setting, the majority of the continent of Khorvaire was, at one point within the last few centuries, conquered by a single ruler and dominated by a powerful group of merchant families. This spread the ...


2

Now we have a colorful group in which no one can speak with the others (why waste a skill to learn a language, when your squishy starting-level character could learn to swing an axe or cast spells better). This seems to be your main problem. Your players didn't invest enough to make a well rounded character when it comes to speaking the language. If your ...


2

"Secret History" is your friend here. The public history of WWII is the way things actually came out, and the campaign deals with things that can never be made public, because they're too weird, frightening or unbelievable. I've been playing an occult WWII campaign like this for a decade, and it works really well. The campaign log is here (warning: ...


1

A hacker works mainly uses (theoretic) knowledge in his role, so I would think of a learned character which would generally be clergy at medieval times, perhaps a specialist as a mason. A for his role in the team. He would probably be the only one who can read and write (which would make forgery perhaps also a possibility). Might have knowledge about ...


1

Here's what worked really well for me during a rather long and involved historically-based campaign where the two of us both had our respective areas of expertise: Treat the historical setting as part of an ongoing knowledge-sharing conversation. Accept that you're creating fiction informed by history, not exploring history directly. What this looks like, ...


1

We've done this a lot, with the same goal as you: to explore historical settings. In my experience the problem with doing this (and also a main benefit) is that people don't make the same ideological shortcuts as normal. When we play medieval fantasy or sci-fi or whatever new people tend to apply all of the racist, sexist, anti-religious, ethnocentric ...


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