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3

In support of other answers, here are some additional historical notes about D&D's tabletop scaling factor (which may be related but necessarily the same as standard map squares). In 1974, Original D&D was printed with the specification that 1" = 10 feet in dungeons (and 1" = 10 yards outside). Articles from Dragon magazine assert this was a ...


34

D&D 3rd edition (2000-2003) The five-foot square was not standardized on until D&D 3rd edition, which made it a standard part of the rules in the original core rulebooks published in the year 2000. However, 10ft and hybrid 10ft/5ft squares still appeared in some dungeon maps until the D&D v3.5 revision (2003), which encouraged the designed ...


10

According to some basic searches, it seems the battle grid of 5 feet seems to have been used a lot during 2nd edition, but it was made the standard during 3rd. And deeply codified by the time of release of D20 SRD. Keep in mind that the grid is a variant rule in 5e, and isn't technically required for a Rules as Written game. The grid is what you make it ...


10

No, it wasn't an actual charm. It's a meme/out-of-game jargon. I suspect that the origin of this phrase was a thread on the old White Wolf forums that have now been deleted, since I can't find the original post with Google. In essence, the idea of the Air-Breathing Mermaid Problem is a criticism of a mechanical widget (spell, power, piece of gear, etc) ...


8

The earliest one I have been able to find is RPGMP3.com, with their "World's Largest Dungeon" series that started on Sep. 24, 2004. Not too long after the podcast term was coined. And they're still uploading recordings! In researching this I found some runner-ups: All Games Considered started May 17, 2005 Dragon's Landing Inn started July, 2005 Have Games,...


-1

The 1995 Kaze to Honō no Majin (or Demons of Wind and Flame) was an adaptation of the second novelization in the Record of Lodoss War series (itself based on a D&D campaign), if we're counting audio drama based on novels based on "replay".


2

Origin When you have an idea for a part of an RPG, how do you get that idea in front of people? It may seem a strange question in these days when there's no barrier between 200 words about a mechanical oryx and the entire Internet, but it hasn't always been so simple. Especially if you wanted people to pay to use your idea, and thus "letter to the editor of ...


46

Wizards of the Coast made numerous attempts to errata the unbalanced polymorph spell family in D&D 3.0 and 3.5, before eventually accepting that the spell was inherently broken due to its unbounded versatility. In 2006, Wizards decisively addressed the issue by sidelining polymorph, removing dependencies on the spell throughout the entire game, and ...


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