57

A few folks have mentioned to me that Mike Mearls has stated elsewhere that it's an oversight in the text, and the intent is that a level 1 character should recover 1 hit die. Seems likely errata-fodder. @MrMattFree : Hit dice question! Basic rules say you get half your HD back at a long rest but doesn't say round up. What does a 1st lvl do? @mikemearls : ...


44

Hit dice have no impact on attacks Your Hit-Dice have nothing to do with your attacks, and are related to your HP max and HP recovery while resting. They're "hit dice" as in "hit points", not as in "hitting enemies". Two Weapon Fighting attack sequence (At level 1) Attack with first dagger (Main action) Roll 1d20 + 3 (dex mod) + 2 (proficiency) If this ...


38

After multiple Long Rests To my knowledge, there are no effects which reliably recover all spent Hit Dice all at once. The primary way to recover Hit Dice is through taking a Long Rest—but you can only recover up to half your total Hit Dice per Long Rest. At the end of a long rest, a character regains all lost hit points. The character also regains spent ...


31

Number 3. From page 163 of the PHB: You add together the Hit Dice granted by all your classes to form your pool of Hit Dice. [...] If your classes give you Hit Dice of different types, keep track of them separately. If you are a paladin 5/cleric 5, for example, you have five d10 Hit Dice and five d8 Hit Dice.


29

No, it's either-or. Otherwise, the rule would say that you always roll and then take whichever is best. As they are instead alternatives to each other, you have to pick first. This is like all other rolls that provide for taking the average as an alternative, such as monster damage rolls. (Mathematically, the fixed value is a better choice because it's a ...


28

The size of the die is determined by monster size, and the number of die is determined by CR. According to AngryGM's very useful monster building series, the size of the hit die is determined by the size of the creature: The die you roll is determined entirely by the creature’s size. Small creatures ALWAYS use a d6. Large creatures ALWAYS use a d10. ...


28

Hit Dice are not required to be spent during a Short Rest to otherwise benefit from it A short rest is a period of downtime, at least 1 hour long, during which a character does nothing more strenuous than eating, drinking, reading, and tending to wounds. A character can spend one or more Hit Dice at the end of a short rest, up to the character's maximum ...


27

A little D&D history will help with the terminology. In the Chainmail miniature wargame circa the early 70s, 1 hit killed 1 veteran warrior in man to man combat. A hero took 4 hits to kill, and a superhero 8 hits to kill. With the initial 1974 release of Dungeons & Dragons this concept was expanded. One hit to kill became roughly 1d6 hit points. So ...


26

You regain zero hit points. Jeremy Crawford said on Twitter: You regain no hit points if you spend a Hit Die and your Constitution modifier reduces the total to 0 or lower. This ruling was made official in the 2017 Errata to the PHB: Short Rest (p. 186). After applying your Constitution modifier to a Hit Die roll, you regain a minimum of 0 hit points ...


25

Per the rules on resting: When you take a short rest, you may spend hit dice in order to regain hit points. A 1st level character will only have 1 hit die, so that's all they can spend - you would roll that die and add your Constitution modifier. Once it's spent, you cannot spend it again until you get it back, which leads us to... You only get hit dice ...


25

This cannot be done If you review the section of using Hit Dice, you will not find any text that shows that roll conferring Temporary Hit Points(THP) on a creature. That would need to be included for those die rolls to do that. Some Spells and sp⁠ecial abi⁠lities confer Temporary Hit Points to a creature. - Player's Handbook (Chapter 9: Combat). The ...


23

No, it's not a thing: hit dice don't do damage Hit dice are used to calculate hit points and healing. Hit Points and Hit Dice Your character’s hit points define how tough your character is in combat and other dangerous situations. Your hit points are determined by your Hit Dice (short for Hit Point Dice). (Basic Rules, (p. 8)) Damage comes from ...


20

There is no method specified. The PHB indicates you should track them separately in Multiclassing, under "Hit Points and Hit Dice" (p163). It has no detail on an order you must spend them, nor the order in which you recover them.


20

Hit dice don't actually affect your hits Hit dice do affect your ability to survive hits. The name originally referred to the dice you might roll to determine your hit point maximum, and in 5th edition it also describes a healing mechanic. Here's the lore on why it's called that. In the miniature wargames that inspired D&D, when two squads or units ...


17

Hit Dice can be "spent" at the end of a Short Rest to recover HP. You have a Maximum number of Hit Dice equal to your total level, with the size of the dice based on your class (As Detailed in the "Hit Points" section of every class description). Because you can expend Hit Dice to heal, you may presently have fewer Hit Dice available to spend than your ...


17

Finding the Rules You might think this would be under Healing in the Combat section of the freely-available Basic Rules, but actually it's under Resting in the Adventuring section. Specifically, under Short Rest, there is: A character can spend one or more Hit Dice at the end of a short rest, up to the character's maximum number of Hit Dice, which is ...


17

The relevant quote is this on page 15 of the PHB, or here in the basic rules: When your character gains a level, his or her class often grants additional features, as detailed in the class description. Nowhere does it mention that it takes any time to gain these features when you level. The only exception is that it explicitly states that leveling ...


17

You can see the relevant information in the Basic Rules and in the Player's Handbook, specifically: Hit Points and Hit Dice (PHB page 12) At 1st level, your character has 1 Hit Die, and the die type is determined by your class. You start with hit points equal to the highest roll of that die, as indicated in your class description. (You also add your ...


17

You would heal at least the minimum amount that Durable grants while using Dwarven Fortitude. The Durable feat says (PHB, p. 166): When you roll a Hit Die to regain hit points, the minimum number of hit points you regain from the roll equals twice your Constitution modifier (minimum of 2). While the Dwarven Fortitude racial feat says (XGtE, p. 74; emphasis ...


16

Monsters have various numbers of Hit Dice. This is information that in general the GM knows and it's listed in the Bestiary (and the SRD). In general, class levels are 1 HD each, so your level 8 buddy has 8 HD. Things like orcs and zombies just have one or two HD; devils and demons and stuff you are likely to banish will usually have 8 or more. In the ...


15

You heal 10+2d10. Part of your emphasis on the feat description: "...if a creature spends a Hit Die during this rest..." Singular. Last sentence of the Medic feature: A creature can do so only once per rest, regardless of how many Hit Dice it spends. RAW on using hit dice to heal after a short rest (emphasis mine): (PHB Chapter 8, Page 186) A ...


15

A monster's hit points are derived from their hit dice From the introduction to the Monster Manual on Hit Points (p. 7): A monster's hit points are presented both as a die expression and as an average number. [...] A monster's Constitution modifier also affects the number of hit points it has. Its Constitution modifier is multiplied by the number of Hit ...


14

Your hit dice has absolutely nothing to do with your attacks Hit dice is a representation of your maximum Hit Points (HP) that are gained every time you level up, as well as HP recovered every time you do short rest (if you choose to use your hit dice(s) to heal damage taken). You gain one hit dice every time you level up. That dice gained is the ...


14

You are correct, it's the dice in parentheses The dice component of the Hit Points line represent the monster's hit dice. This is implied, but not made explicit in the Introduction to the Monster Manual or in Chapter 12 of the Basic Rules under Hit Points. For example, if a monster has a Constitution of 12 (+1 modifier) and 2d8 Hit Dice, it has 2d8 + 2 ...


14

The first row of the table means that if you are affecting creatures with exactly one hit die or less (kobolds, for example, had only half a standard hit die) then you roll 4d4 to determine the number affected. The second row of the table means that if you are affecting creatures with anything more than one hit die (technically, "one hit die plus one hit ...


14

The designers likely wanted 80 Hit Points Because they were consistent in saying the Demilich has 80 Hit Points and they didn't contradict the Undead Nature trait in the errata it seems likely that the change to Demilich hit dice was a mistake and that they intended for the Demilich to have 80 Hit Points. That being said the DM can freely adjust the Hit ...


13

It appears that there is no minimum result for a die roll. However, in this case, you are rolling for the number of hit points that the character will regain. I think with this wording that any result lower than 0 would be treated as a 0. You can't regain a negative number.


13

10+2d10 This line reveals how it works (recall that the feature references a single die): A creature can do so only once per rest, regardless of how many Hit Dice it spends. You will gain the maximum roll from only 1 die meaning that you must roll the other two. It is worth noting that you don't restore 3d10 without the medic feat but instead restore ...


12

The rules are no different than for PCs. Though the rules for Resting on PHB p. 186 say character, not creature, these are the only rules in the game for how resting works, so all creatures with effects from resting (such as healing) have to use them. The normal rule is that on a short rest, a character may spend any number of their unspent hit dice to roll ...


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