New answers tagged

-1

D&D is a game of choices; tradeoffs and gambles. Your players are gambling that they can sacrifice their ability to observe their surroundings to have an edge in combat. That's a valid gamble. If you make torches stronger in combat, then you reduce the disparity between these two choices. Similarly, if you make dungeons well lit, you again reduce the ...


-2

My problem with this whole argument is that you are assuming they (wizard) would be having to make calculations in order to know exactly where to place the fireball as to not hit themselves/allies when they are danger close. Does a quarterback have to do calculations when avoiding the defense to know exactly how to throw the ball get to the receiver? Does a ...


3

Mechanic-focused and roleplay-focused are often at odds Combat is generally the most mechanical and least roleplay focused part of a D&D game in my experience. As a result, fiddling with combat mechanics for a character is a relatively ineffective way to encourage roleplaying. A player who already wants to RP heavily will probably do so either way, but a ...


-1

Make it a level adjusted ability. Fireball is too strong at level 1, and too weak at level 20. This would be my suggested ability track by level, with you only having the level appropriate ability. 1- burning hands 3- scorching ray 5- fireball 7 - wall of fire 9 - immolation 11 - sunbeam 13 delayed blast fireball 15 sunburst 17 meteor swarm. That ensures the ...


10

Step 1: prepare answers to "obvious" questions. Note that these aren't questions that we need answered in order to answer your question, but that probably need to be answered within your game world. Note also that the answers to these questions may be "I don't know yet" - or, potentially more interestingly, "the characters don't know ...


0

Treat it like Wild Magic It sounds like you want to make this more of a role-play quirk and avoid abuse; somewhat like wild magic. Since this happens on a spell attack, perhaps you could change a targeted effect into an area effect but keeping the same theme or damage type. Examples: Cold/Slashing: Ice Knife transforms into a small Ice Storm or Cloud of ...


1

I thought I would have a go at trying to make something as this seems like a fairly interesting problem. I looked into it and if you only want to roll 2d20 it is impossible to get a distribution perfectly between no advantage and advantage but you can at least in theory make something really close, even if the dice are indistinguishable. I originally made ...


2

TLDR: Roll regular advantage, then also roll a d4, if d4 rolls 1 then flip the value (20->1, 1->20, 19->2, 11->10, etc) Inpired by the answers I saw... So after I posted the question I continued experimenting and did manage to come to the realization that to get the distribution I was looking for, the simplest way was probably just to modify the ...


26

Advantage when the dice Match I like Eric's answer, and agree that "The most straightforward way to add "half Advantage" is to only make it work half of the time." However, that particular solution involves the addition of a third die. Granted, a pretty low increase in complexity, but strictly speaking unnecessary. An even simpler 'half ...


10

I would suggest rolling one or two d12 and a d20 for partial advantage. Here are the odds for "at least" results using Anydice. a straight d20 (black) highest of a d12 and a d20 (orange) highest of two d12 and a d20 (blue) normal advantage, highest of two d20 (green) Analysis: Likelyhood of getting 13 or more is exactly same as with straight ...


18

Erik's suggestion of effectively flipping a coin to choose between a normal roll and a roll with advantage is pretty much the ideal "half advantage" roll, as it produces a distribution exactly halfway between normal and advantage. Its only down side is that you end up having to roll an extra die (or flip an actual coin, I guess). If you'd instead ...


45

The most straightforward way to add "half Advantage" is to only make it work half of the time. You can do this by using different colored D20s and throw in another d6 to decide whether you're allowed to choose or not. For example, a red D20, a green D20, and a green d6. If you roll 4-6 on the d6 you pick the highest die, if you roll 1-3 on the d6 ...


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