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48

Your best bet is the Ersatz Eye, a common magic item listed on page 137 of Xanathar's Guide to everything: Wondrous item, common (requires attunement) This artificial eye replaces a real one that was lost or removed. While the ersatz eye is embedded in your eye socket, it can’t be removed by anyone other than you, and you can see through the ...


31

Health Status Generally I follow a health status report system (when asked how each creature looks) like this: 100% - Uninjured or in perfect condition >75% - Minor injuries, doesn't show any signs of slowing, just a few minor inconveniencing injuries >50% - Injured, visibly wounded with some nondebilitating injuries, but still fighting strong <50% - ...


28

The What As far as I know, there are 2 basic ways to regrow a limb: Regenerate, a 7th level Cleric/Bard/Druid spell Ring of Regeneration (DMG p 191) - note that in order to regrow a limb, the user must be attuned to the ring for 1d6 + 1 days and have at least 1 hp for the entire peirod (meaning that if you die, the time period restarts) Alternatively, you ...


26

Optional rules for Lingering Injuries can be found on page 272 of the DMG and be used at the DM's discretion. Healing can remove the injury as written, but a DM could always rule otherwise.


26

Magic items that let you see The classic official eye replacement is the Eye of Vecna, though it's an artifact, and a nasty one at that (DMG 224): To attune to the eye, you must gouge out your own eye and press the artifact into the empty socket. The eye grafts itself to your head and remains there until you die. Once in place, the eye transforms into a ...


21

Yes, it's a very good trade-off. Every level-up, you will gain additional hitpoints. However, +1 AC is hard to get once you maxed out your armour options (which you most likely already have at level 7). Especially as a STR-based fighter and considering the way lower AC totals high-level 5e characters can achieve. The +1 will put you above other fighters, ...


21

Roll for Shoes doesn't really have a "combat system" as such — unless you houserule one in, of course. Rather, combat in RfS is basically handled using the same general mechanics as everything else: the player rolls Nd6, where N is the level of the skill they're using, and tries to beat the GM's roll. The thing to keep in mind is that RfS is a rules-...


21

Your wild shape forms will have legs (if it is supposed to) Wild shape allows you to take the form of an animal. Starting at 2nd level, you can use your action to magically assume the shape of a beast that you have seen before. When you wild shape you take the complete form of whatever you are shaping into. The size, shape, and/or condition of your ...


21

Upcast spells (cast with a 6th level slot) count as 6th level spells, but it's unclear whether this would apply to the Horrible Scar rule In the PHB, p. 201, under Spell Slots: Casting a Spell at a Higher Level When a spellcaster casts a spell using a slot that is of a higher level than the spell, the spell assumes the higher level for that casting. ...


19

Creatures are not injured while they have at least one Hit Point This might sound confusing, but Hit Points are not health. Player's Handbook describes Hit Points as an abstraction of character's possibilities to avoid death: Hit Points Hit points represent a combination of physical and mental durability, the will to live, and luck. Creatures with ...


18

The rules simply didn't take the flying case into account. You'll notice there is no reference in any of the entries in the table to losing a wing instead of an arm. I think it was simply written before these flying races became playable. The highlighted text makes perfect sense if you are restricted to using your legs to move around but makes no sense if ...


16

Healing is constantly referred to in the rules as regaining hit points. The Lingering Injuries table says magical healing so that's exactly what it means; hit points regained through magical means. The PHB says: magical methods such as a cure wounds spell or a potion of healing can remove damage in an instant. So yes, potions count. In the case of a ...


16

There's a few points here. First off, even on a critical hit, it's up to DM fiat as to whether the NPC just dies outright, or takes HP damage, or whatever. If this is an important, named NPC, you probably want to have them take damage rather than just declaring them dead or dying. If you decide to have the attack deal critical damage against HP, then do ...


16

I'm still not convinced that my answer here doesn't duplicate this question, but I digress. There are no "limb regrowth" options readily available at level 3 Your options, as I see them: Retcon it. Take it back. It feels bad, but we've all done it. No one is satisfied by it, but sometimes we, as DMs, get ourselves into situations that we're not prepared ...


15

Here's how to figure this out. First, let's think about monster attack bonuses at your level. I looked at three example CR7 monsters. The giant ape has +9 to hit. The oni has +7 to hit. The shield guardian has +7 to hit. So let's say that the average monster has a +8 to hit you. With an 18 AC, you'll be hit 55% of the time; with a 19 AC, you would be ...


13

Real-world-damage is classified in several different ways in D&D 3.5 Hit point damage What are hit points? Hit points are your capability to not take the fatal blow, but are also how wounded you are. Are these two definitions a dycothomy? Well, as with every abstraction I'm prone say yes. Poisons that only get applied by harming you enemy and drawing ...


13

Yes, any part of the body broken off while stoned is still lost when restored The Flesh to Stone spell states: If the creature is physically broken while petrified, it suffers from similar deformities if it reverts to its original state. Likewise the Basilisk entry in the MM states: Unfortunately for [creatures turned to stone], any parts lost in ...


12

There is little or no RAW for in-depth injuries in D&D 5E, neither causing them nor healing them. Characters hurt in battle from hit point loss are assumed to be "worn down" in a generic fashion. There are a couple of special states (unconscious and dying), which also avoid dealing with the nature of wounds. I think your ruling that a lethal attack, ...


11

The comments on the original post have some interesting and useful commentary and ideas. Damage is one the issues addressed by the creator. For damage, we had this cartoony thing where you get busted up and humiliated in one scene, and then we don't really talk about the damage afterwards - unless you want to! Being badly beaten has effects in the fiction,...


11

1. RAW clarification: Doubly optional While the whole Lingering Injuries section describes an optional rule, the list of situations which inflict them is also just a suggestion: It's up to you to decide when to check for a lingering injury. A creature might sustain a lingering injury under the following circumstances: (DMG 272, emphasis mine) So the ...


10

Rules as written, there are no injuries like this. Literally nothing in the rules inflicts them, the rules don’t specify what effects they have on your stats or abilities, and so on. Injury is entirely abstracted to the realm of HP damage, and to a lesser extent, ability score damage. There are two references to the concept in the rules: regenerate, and ...


10

RAW yes, RAI probably not. RAW: Let's analyze Mending's description: This spell repairs a single break or tear in an object you touch, such as a broken chain link, two halves of a broken key, a torn cloak, or a leaking wineskin. As long as the break or tear is no larger than 1 foot in any dimension, you mend it, leaving no trace of the former damage. ...


9

If you want, sure The basic rule of D&D is on p. 6 of the PHB. The DM describes the environment. - "Here is a guy with arms." The players describe what they want to do. - "I want to rip his arms off!" The DM narrates the results of the adventurers’ actions. - "You rip his arms off." However, there is no mechanic in the rules that supports ...


9

From the Developer Answered Questions thread on the FFG Forums (found inside the General Combat Question collapse): Rules as written a character would not suffer a second Critical Injury if the character takes more damage and is already incapacitated. However, since the character is incapacitated and cannot defend himself, the GM would be perfectly ...


9

A missing wing is not easily replaced at lower levels. You’re right, magic can fix anything, but at lower levels limbs are not so easily regrown. To regrow a limb you’d need access to the Regenerate spell: The target's severed body members (fingers, legs, tails, and so on), if any, are restored after 2 minutes. However, this is a 7th level spell. Your ...


8

Regardless the perfectly correct rules-as-written answer given here, I find that approach highly unsatisfactory and uninspiring in the course of actual play; I am more likely to apply that line of reasoning to the players than to the monsters, because I find in straight up D&D, few players want to spend three or four rounds beating up on a boss monster ...


8

There are a few resources you can reference for examples of how to handle such specific injuries. Scars and Wounds from Skull and Shackles The Skull & Shackles Player's Guide includes a sidebar on permanent scars and wounds as an optional rule to support representing the harsh piratical lifestyle; it is reproduced alongside the Injury and Death section ...


8

No, the healing is not magical Only spells and things which are explicitly described as magic are considered magical. Monk effects mostly come from Ki, which is usually considered a non-dispellable form of innate magic. See this question about whether ki counts as magical for exceptions to the rule and a more in depth analysis of the Monk specifically. ...


7

RAW aren't really equipped to handle limb loss. Given that they even have a spell expressly for that purpose and that they place it at such a high level leaves me to assume limb loss was intended to be restricted to out of combat scenarios. Conversely, limb recovery was intended to be an extraordinary thing (apparently more incredible than resurrecting the ...


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