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39

No, you can't see the creature's aura, but you can detect if there's magic within 30 feet of you, including magic items he might be carrying, though you can't determine the nature of the items. From the text of Detect Magic: For the duration, you sense the presence of magic within 30 feet of you. If you sense magic in this way, you can use your action ...


37

No, they don't get opportunity attacks. From PHB, page 195: You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature that you can see moves out of your reach.


36

The Sorcerer can discriminate between invisible targets provided that they know the invisible targets are there Once you are aware of an invisible creature, provided they are not hidden, you know where it is (because they are still making noise, kicking up dust, etc.) but you cannot, in general, see them. If a spell specifies that you have to be able to ...


35

Yes. PHB p. 291 description of the Invisible condition states in part: An invisible creature is impossible to see without the aid of magic or a special sense. Blindsight is such a "special sense". (Other special senses that work against invisible creatures are Tremorsense and Truesight.)


34

These types of questions are pretty common. The rules are often unclear, IMO not necessarily because of inadequacies of the developers/writers, but because (as we see from the variety of answers/discussions) these are tough, complex questions. I don't have a definitive answer, but I have a recommendation that I believe warrants more than a comment, so I'll ...


34

Yes The beneficiary of a nondetection spell: Can’t be targeted by any divination magic, and Can't be perceived through magical scrying sensors. There are only two spells in the PHB that create magical scrying sensors: clairvoyance and scrying. These are obviously covered by Item 2. It's reasonable to assume that the remaining 28 spells from the ...


33

This was addressed in Sage Advice. It does beat True Seeing: The nondetection spell hides you from divination magic. True seeing is a divination spell. — Jeremy Crawford (@JeremyECrawford) October 13, 2016


32

A random roll for location is the best solution when an Out of Character player knows the location but has to "guess" in-game without that knowledge. Given that, I'd like to discuss the times when there is and isn't a known location of a creature. The RAW regarding unseen attackers and hidden attackers is fairly clear, although it is also somewhat ...


32

The Special Sense Blindsense bypasses the mechanics of being Invisible The Invisible condition states (emphasis mine): An invisible creature is impossible to see without the aid of magic or a special sense. Blindsight is a special type of sense, along with senses like True Sight and Tremorsense. The condition explicitly calls out that there are ...


31

You can ready one attack without breaking invisibility, but not a spell. Readying an action allows you to use your action to act outside of your turn. This allows you to ready an attack action which you will execute later. Once you do execute it, you will have made an attack and will break invisibility. Note that it doesn't matter if you make your attack ...


31

The additional end condition affects creatures separately This is what The spell ends for a target that attacks or casts a spell. means. If this addendum was not there, it would mean that the spell, as a whole, ends. This limits the effect. Also, you can concentrate on spells that do not target or affect you, this case is no different.


30

Ok, crazy thing about the difference between hidden and invisible...there isn't much of one. The big difference between the two is the ability to be attacked directly. If you are hidden, your enemy doesn't know your location, and thus cannot target you directly. They have to guess (DM should use some kind of randomization here), and may or may not actually ...


30

According to Jeremy Crawford, lead designer of D&D 5e, attacks have advantage against invisible creatures affected by Faerie Fire. So your first interpretation aligns best with the intention of the spell.


28

"items picked up disappear if tucked into the clothing or pouches worn by the creature." – Invisibility, d20srd Based on the above, I'd say stuff put into the box arguably becomes invisible. A pouch is a container. A box is a container. Stuff put into an invisible container disappear. Sure, the RAW says in the quote above that the container is "worn by ...


26

You can, as being invisible imposes no penalties per Paizo's FAQ. Invisibility: Can you see yourself when you're invisible? The spell doesn't say one way or the other. Because being invisible doesn't give you penalties on actions that require you to be able to see exactly what you're doing (such as picking a lock), you can assume that you can at ...


25

Yes, advantage applies Why? The you in the unseen attackers sections is referring to whatever creature is invisible / can't be seen. In this case it is your familiar, and it would have advantage even though it uses your attack modifier.


25

When you try to hide, make a Dexterity (Stealth) check. Until you are discovered or you stop hiding, that check's total is contested by the Wisdom (Perception) check of any creature that actively searches for signs of your presence. [..] An invisible creature can't be seen, s0 it can always try to hide. Signs of its passage might still be noticed, ...


25

Being invisible is not different You do not roll with advantage if you are invisible, you are simply allowed to roll (per the "Hiding" sidebar on PHB p. 177 or here in the basic rules): You can’t hide from a creature that can see you, and if you make noise (such as shouting a warning or knocking over a vase), you give away your position. An invisible ...


24

I can find no Sage Advice regarding the matter, but the rules about unseen attackers starts with this: Combatants often try to escape their foes' notice by hiding, casting the invisibility spell ...(PHB 195) This seems to suggest what I believe every table uses: If you are invisible, you attack someone who cannot see you with advantage, even if doing ...


24

Thievery Part of your answer is in the quoted text... as long as it starts and remains within the 30cm radius. Unlike other games' invisibility, this effect doesn't apply to things the character picks up after the spell goes into effect - they explicitly have to be on him (or within 30cm) when he casts the spell. Anything the character attempts to steal ...


24

It is not redundant There are many ways you could take damage on your turn, thus allowing you to use Misty Escape as a reaction on your turn in addition to (before) your Action and possible Bonus Action: An enemy was holding an attack or damaging spellcast that is triggered before you attack or cast a spell on your turn. Many ability/spell effects also ...


23

The wording for Invisibility is (PHB p.254): The spell ends for a target that attacks or casts a spell. And the Ring of Spell Storing is (DMG p.192): While wearing this ring, you can cast any spell stored in it. and ... but is otherwise treated as if you cast the spell. If you use the ring you "cast a spell". If you are under an Invisibility ...


22

No, you must see your target. The text of Sacred Flame states (emphasis added), Flame-like radiance descends on a creature that you can see within range. Likewise, stuff like Hold Person, Magic Missile, and Charm Person have similar wording: You attempt to charm a humanoid you can see within range. The wording is clear that a creature must be ...


21

Unfortunately, the rule about this is a little ambiguous. Anything the target is wearing or carrying is invisible as long as it is on the target’s person. This has 2 interpretations that are, as far as I can tell, equally valid. Anything the target is wearing or carrying at the time you cast the spell is invisible as long as it is on the target’s ...


21

Can you dispel a magic effect you can't perceive? Yes, as long as you can locate it somehow. If you can't find it somehow, then no. This reduces down to the related question: Can you target a target that you can't perceive? And the answer to that is a qualified yes. Yes, if you can land your dispel magic on the desired target somehow. As we'll see, your ...


21

Being invisible and being transparent are two different things. Air is not invisible, it refracts light (that is why the sky is blue). It is simply highly transparent. Thus this spell does not interact with the way you percieve air.


21

Yes, the attack is still at disadvantage Percival already pointed out the rules pertinent to that, on page 194 of the PHB: When you attack a target that you can't see, you have disadvantage on the attack roll. This is true whether you're guessing the target's location or you're targeting a creature you can hear but not see. But why? A few reasons why ...


21

Yes, the sensor can be seen with truesight I will briefly state what has already been pointed out in Dinomaster's answer: The clairvoyance spell specifies that it creates "an invisible sensor", and truesight it described as allowing a creature to "see invisible creatures and objects", so this implies that such a sensor can be seen via truesight, although ...


21

Movement breaks the invisibility of "One With Shadows". The Eldritch Invocation "One With Shadows" states: When you are in an area of dim light or darkness, you can use your action to become invisible until you move or take an action or a reaction. Emphasis mine. If you move, whether on your turn or outside of combat, the invisibility ends.


20

As per RAW: Accidentally Ending Movement in an Illegal Space: Sometimes a character ends its movement while moving through a space where it’s not allowed to stop. When that happens, put your miniature in the last legal position you occupied, or the closest legal position, if there’s a legal position that’s closer. Source: Special Movement Rules ...


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