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3

Dispel Magic doesn't require you to see the target Unless the mage has spent its action Hiding, you know where it is. Cast dispel magic on it. Dispel magic has a range of 120ft, so if the mage is close enough to fireball then its close enough to be dispelled. Alternatively, Ready dispel magic for when the mage casts a spell. Neither does fireball :-) ...


5

Note: The following assumes that the core issue is that the location of the mage is unknown to the party, rather than simply that attacking someone that is invisible causes disadvantage. Knowledge of the mage's location makes these strategies less desirable, favoring things AoE attacks instead. During battle: Control the battlefield in ways that break the ...


12

Maybe killing isn't what the DM has in mind I see 2 issues, first is that Greater Invisibility only lasts a minute, if this mage is spending the first turn in combat casting it on themselves, then your team has chance to take them out or at least do damage. If they start invisible, then that sounds like your DM isn't 'playing fair' because a group of ...


22

When making a ranged spell attack, you follow the normal rules for making an attack, just as you would if trying to stab or shoot the target with a weapon. This also means you apply the normal rules for trying to target an invisible creature: When you attack a target that you can't see, you have disadvantage on the attack roll. This is true whether you'...


19

Prevent it from going unseen in the first place The most straightforward way of hurting something that is invisible is by preventing it from going invisible in the first place. If the mage is within 60 feet of you when it casts Greater Invisibility, both your Bard and the two Sorcerers can attempt to counterspell him. This is by far the best solution, ...


19

Remember that unless the hobgoblin takes an action to hide, you know which square it's in(PHB, 291) and also discussed in this question. Weapon attacks don't, in general, require a visible foe. A number of spells require you to see the target, but a few don't, like Guiding Bolt(PHB, 248), which I bet you have. "But those are rolled with disadvantage, Exal!...


9

First, about your scenario specifically: Do be aware that being invisible is not the same as hidden. Did your sorcerer take a hide action? To even lose the Wyvern's awareness he'll have to surpass its passive perception of 14. If he did roll at least a 15, did you consider using a turn on an action to roll the Wyvern's +4 perception against his stealth ...


19

The Wyvern is unable to pass through the Sorcerer's space and must move around them or attack them. It would seem there are no additional rules that come into play here, either from invisibility or movement, so unless your monster has a trample ability, it would not be able to move through the Sorcerer's space, as per your quoted movement rule. (It feels a ...


20

1. Invisible is not hidden While being invisible does make you able to attempt to hide anywhere, it does not make you automatically undetected. You still make sound for example. (See the sidebar on hiding on page 177 of the PHB.) Thus it is usually clear whether a character disappeared to another plane or not. Circumstances might affect this, so the DM ...


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