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29

Because it discourages zero-sum exchanges. Someone just asked this of Fred Hicks in the Fate Core Kickstarter comments. He replied that if Fate points were exchanged immediately after the action in which they were used, the flow of Fate points would become zero-sum: Let's imagine we're doing it your way. I have an aspect you're invoking, to my detriment, so ...


22

None of these happen. They don't make sense or aren't using those mechanics properly, and ultimately, it's going to take a lot more than that to get this guy to join the war. A preliminary dip into basics. Since compels and invokes seem to be getting mishandled here, I'm going to take a brief dip into what they're for and how they work. Compelling characters ...


18

You start at the beginning: Fate points represent those moments in the fiction when an Aspect of the story becomes prominent. If you're spending a Fate point on "My Father's Sword," it's because the fact that the sword was handed down to you is particularly relevant in this scene. As a result, spending them on the first three swings in combat might not have ...


15

You're gonna have to go to the Fate Core book for the full explanation. Although they don't mention it for this particular case, FAE makes a habit of expecting players to refer to Core for more details on a host of subjects. This is because Fate Accelerated, in order to stay svelte, doesn't talk much about corner cases. Since multiple free invokes on one ...


15

fate is a narrative system. If the narrative for how each character gets these boosts doesn't work, the GM can simply disallow it. It's that easy - no fluent narrative to get all the boosts, and the player doesn't get all the boosts. This is especially important for situations where a player tries to use conflicting aspects or compels. If Bob wants to use ...


14

Standardising free invokes as spendable for compels will break the fate point economy and pull the teeth out of compels. The fate point economy is one of the only things that the Core book and Toolkit tell us not to mess with much, because it's the heart of the system and balanced very carefully. A free invoke is a +2 on a roll. It can only be spent on one ...


12

Once you reroll you're stuck with the new result. You don't get to pick the highest of the two; the previous roll's gone. It's for this reason the authors recommend only rerolling on a –3 or –4 in a sidebar on Fate Core page 68: The reroll vs the +2 Rerolling the dice is a little riskier than just getting the +2 bonus, but has the potential for greater ...


11

It's the third one. Both parties roll and see their totals. Then they can invoke aspects until neither can or wants to invoke any more, with no set order to who can invoke what when. When you're following the steps in How To Do Stuff, both parties involved in the roll are moving through these steps together simultaneously. So when we reach this step: Roll ...


11

An aspect is just a mechanical reminder of a thing that's true in the story: it's always "on." This means some actions are possible or impossible, easier or harder, because of the thing the aspect describes. However, sometimes an aspect COULD make an action or event easier or extra complicated, but it doesn't have to. This is where compels and invokes come ...


11

It's option 2: Both sides roll, then decide to start invoking aspects. This comes across in How To Do Stuff: Outcomes, Actions and Approaches. First, you choose your action and approach, and then: Roll the Dice, Add Your Bonus Time to take up dice and roll. Take the bonus associated with the approach you’ve chosen and add it to the result on the dice. If ...


9

The important thing your player must understand is that the sword does not give him an ongoing bonus because his roll isn't about if he can hit with the sword. His roll is about if he gets to tell a bit of the story about the swordfight in question. There's a free bonus (free invoke) for people who create new story elements (create advantage), and a paid (...


8

In addition to being invokable and compellable, aspects are True: if the NPC is a Stout Pacifist you're perfectly within your rights as a GM to have them refuse to get involved as a belligerent, no invoke or compel necessary. If the player is trying to get the NPC to give a different kind aid, the aspect would be a good candidate for an invoke (to make the ...


7

The problem here began long before the player ran out of Fate points, when he took an aspect to solely represent his father's sword and expected to use it on virtually every action just to represent the utility of having a sword. Fate Core, on the "Intro to Choosing Aspects" on page 36 says of choosing aspects: Aspects which don’t help you tell a good ...


7

As Dakeyras pointed out, Fate is all about the narrative. This doesn't just mean that there has to be a justification for invokes : said justification should probably be included in the description. It's not just "I invoke Cyber Legs for a +2 to my Attack" but "I'm kicking him square in the face ****rolls, sees a success with style just out of reach****... ...


7

I'd say both options 1 and 2, and in that order. The GM offers the compel, and the player can accept it, gain a fate point and sit down. Or he may refuse it, paying a fate point, which lets him continue with trying to convince the NPC as a challenge. The GM still has the option to make that challenge harder by invoking the aspect. Since the aspect is on ...


7

If what you are seeking about great beasts are rules about how to pact with them and what powers they concede then Arcana Exxet is the book you seek It include rules for around thirty powers (or great beast, or aeons, depending of the entity). They come in the same format as the arcanes in the core book: you pact with it (which is often an adventure in ...


7

As you've seen across the various iterations of Fate, boosts don't have a set duration but they're "super-transient"1 because they represent fleeting advantages and disadvantages. The rule of thumb is that a boost should be kept around until there's a good opportunity to use it--and not much longer. Boosts... go away on their own fairly quickly—usually ...


6

I recommend reading this part of the Fate SRD. The sub-header is "Deciding When to Use Mechanics" and it tells us that Because aspects tell us what’s important, they also tell us when it’s most appropriate to use the mechanics to deal with a situation, rather than just letting people decide what happens just by describing what they do. This defines ...


6

The situation you've described sounds hard to justify within the context of the story: Backlash is usually a fairly personal thing and only aspects directly affecting the wizard are easy to justify in helping to control a spell. I can't say whether it's legit or not though; although it seems very far-fetched to me, only your group can really decide rule on ...


6

The main limit of what aspects can be used for what actions is basically what the table will accept - your GM and your fellow players. My rule of thumb is, if I can say it in a sentence with a straight face, it works. I.E. "Because Chivalry's Not Dead Dammit, I hit the demon that's attacking my girlfriend really hard." So lets try that. "Because of my Fiery ...


6

You get Fate Points from adverse invokes at the end of the scene. Here, under invoking aspects: If the aspect you invoke is on someone else’s character sheet, including situation aspects attached to them, and the invoke is to their disadvantage, you give them the fate point you spent. (Invoking a third party’s aspect is treated just like invoking an ...


4

Yes, that's totally legit. So long as you can describe how your character's aspect is beneficial to the circumstance of the roll, you can spend the Fate point. The GM (and the rest of the group) may ask for more clarification if they're unsure how you're justifying the use, though. Sometimes it'll turn out they think it's too much of a stretch and the GM ...


4

I think the confusion arises from the fact that Fate Accelerated Edition is so condensed that sometimes explanations are glossed over. Fate Accelerated's rules (not clear enough) If we only have Fate Accelerated rules to go on, it seems you only get to stack your two free invokes on a Create an Advantage action when you succeed with style on creating or ...


3

I would suggest that it might be a problem with the way the character is created. An aspect is sometimes beneficial, and is sometimes detrimental, and sometimes has mechanical effect at all. A stunt always provides a clear and reliable mechanical bonus. So, if the sword in question was supposed to be unquestionably better than other swords in all conditions,...


3

It sounds like your player is having trouble distinguishing between using a sword and getting extra oomph because it's a better sword than the average one. Item based advantages in any game are tricky because it's points that can simply be taken away if they're disarmed. Speaking of which, you might want to talk to him about reorganizing his character ...


3

Mechanics Aspect: A phrase describing some aspect of the character that you want to be able to use for bonuses in play. Invoking an aspect: using an aspect for a mechanical bonus to a roll. Note that it doesn't need to be YOUR aspect. ① +2 on your die roll after rolling (p 12, 68) Reroll your dice (p 12, 68) +2 on someone else's dice (p 68) +2 to the ...


3

For what it's worth, I found the following in Fate Core on page 149, describing how to run Challenges: If you have any boosts that went unused in the challenge, feel free to keep them around for the rest of this scene or whatever scene you're transitioning to, if the events of the challenge connect directly to the next scene. Clearly a boost which isn't ...


2

Some Aspects are more absolute than others. If a room is filled with "Absolute Darkness", that's going to make certain things absolutely impossible, without an invoke. "Dark" might just mean that it has to be Overcome. Or not. All depends how Dark it is. "Dazed" doesn't mean they can't Shoot. What it most means, outside of whatever way they and you ...


2

All aspects are story facts but not all story facts are aspects. Aspects are facts that play a non-trivial role in your story. That's why they make the basis on which many game mechanisms run. So what happens when you want to turn a trivial fact into a significant one? That's exactly what the create advantage action is for. It lets you conjure aspects out ...


1

@doppelgreener's answer is correct in all particulars; no roll is final until both rolls are final. But while you can repeatedly volley Fate Points back and forth, often times you'll see a GM locking in a number for a player to hit in advance, not because they're getting the rules wrong but out of concern for pacing and flow. Here's why you as GM might want ...


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