104

Ask your DM whether it's supposed to be viable to decipher it, or whether you were supposed to find the clues in game. Given that they used a genuine (even if simple) cipher and a proper script hiding an actual message, it seems likely that they meant for cracking it in real life to be an option. But it might just be that they never expected anyone to ...


102

Can Imps talk? Yes. Yes they can. It's not really very complicated; it says so right there in the rulebooks. They also say how short and long rests work, and even have some recommendations for adventure pacing that could give a DM an idea as to how much/little time pressure is 'normal'. What to do when your DM hates Warlocks, you unknowingly made a ...


65

No, Of Course Not. First, this is not what the feat says. It says you can mimic the speech of a person, or the sounds of a creature. It says absolutely nothing about understanding the speech as it is being spoken, much less performing the kind of complex adaptation involved in learning the language whole. Second, this is just not how languages in the ...


53

The find familiar spell allows you to summon a spirit that takes the form of an animal from a list, as a pact of the chain warlock you are allowed to choose the imp form. An important sentence in the spell is the following: the familiar has the statistics of the chosen form, though it is a celestial, fey, or fiend (your choice) instead of a beast. Part ...


47

No answer we can give you will help you deal with the real yardstick of “what’s fair” you will need to clear: your DM. Settling this kind of thing is their job anyway, and bypassing them risks making a little nothing into a conflict. Just ask your DM. “Hey, I’m sorry, I rushed making my PC and never noticed I was supposed to choose a favoured enemy language....


46

You ask about the effect: What would the consequences be of removing Common from a large majority of creatures? It often makes the game needlessly difficult We - the people I played with from about 1975 to about 1987 - tried this in early versions of the game1, in a variety of ways, and it simply slowed down play with little to no other benefit ...


45

I am afraid that there are no solution that fits all need. All have drawbacks and advantages. Accents, if you can do them, work great. Pick a real life language and use an outrageous accent of the same for your Blurbnish. Clearly, the more outlandish and caricature the accent, the better as long as it fits the tone of the game. If the game is real life, ...


44

There is good support that it probably means "shield" or "barrier" or "gate" or the like I agree with Miles Bedinger's answer noting that dwarven words relating to "shield" start with "bar", and that this may be a clue to the semantics. To wit: barak: "backbone, strength, shield" barakor: "those who shield" There are further considerations that support ...


44

Yes When you 'learn to do' something that doesn't mean that you are forced to do it. The ability makes it clear that you are merging your ki to translate the message, and just because you know how to do that doesn't mean you are forced to do that. The whole point of ki is control of one's self. Generally beneficial abilities like this have absolute wording,...


43

The only monster in the MM that knows the cant is the Assassin (p. 343). In the DMG about creating NPC-s we find a table on page 90 that lists knowledge of the cant as a possible NPC "talent". However that table is not intended to represent the populace of the world and should not mean that a random 5% of the people know this secret language. It rather ...


42

This is a place where you should probably revert to descriptive GMing rather than reciting the character's lines. Say something like: The Elf approaches you (the dwarf) and says something in a language you don't understand. It sounds like elf talk to you, but you don't have any idea what he's saying. Your player can then react to this situation. If they ...


42

The most likely candidate for a transcription error resulting in luraic is probably the Luiric language of Faerûnian halflings, who originally hail from the country of Luiren in the southeast.


40

Sometimes... We have three different things to look at here. Comprehend Languages says... For the duration, you understand the literal meaning of any spoken language that you hear. It goes on to talk about written messages, but this is all we have for spoken language. Druidic says... You know Druidic, the secret language of druids. You can speak the ...


40

There aren't any options at level 3 There's a few options that seem like they might work, but they won't quite do the trick Comprehend Languages won't work because it only affects the caster (and does not translate for the caster) So the Sorcerer and Wizard could learn Comprehend Languages to at least understand what the dragon is saying, but they wouldn't ...


40

According to Volo's Guide to Monsters (p.33), Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes (p.29) and Out of the Abyss (p.246), Gnolls are created in the wake of Yeenoghu's great rampages across the planes. Originally, they were packs of hyenas that feasted on the corpses left behind by the great Demon Lord. They now breed true, but it's entirely possible that new tribes of ...


39

No. Comprehend languages only lets you understand the literal meaning of the words. For the duration, you understand the literal meaning of any spoken language that you hear. Thieves cant states that the message is coded so only thieves would understand. During your rogue training you learned thieves' cant, a secret mix of dialect, jargon and code ...


38

Unless you and the players speak Elvish, you have three options: Say that they're speaking another language without saying what it is. Say that they're speaking Elvish. Say a few Elvish words for flavor. To decide which option to use, think about the effects of each: The party only knows that this language is one they themselves don't speak. The ...


38

Languages don't come from stats, ability scores, or skills. They come from race, and possibly from class or background. Languages By virtue of your race, your character can speak, read, and write certain languages. (PHB p.17) From their first mention languages are set out as a racial benefit. Two exceptions arise--Druidic and Thieves' Cant--as class ...


37

While elves get Common and Elvish, high elves get an additional language of their choice. Extra Language. You can speak, read, and write one extra language of your choice. (PHB p.24, "High Elf") With two more languages of choice from their background this gives a high elf acolyte a total of 5: Common, Elvish, and 3 of their choosing. In the case of the ...


35

Script refers to the characters used. To an Orc, text written in Dwarvish would have familiar letters, but otherwise would make no sense to him. Your comparison between English and French is spot-on: both have the same script, but being able to read English does not help you understand French. Compare this to for example English and Chinese: not only do you ...


35

Sources where they first became available to players: PHB = Player's Handbook MM = Monsters Manual MToF = Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes SCAG = Swords Coast Adventurer's Guide VGtM = Volo's Guide to Monsters GGtR = Guildmasters' Guide to Ravnica WGtE = Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron DMG = Dungeon Master's Guide Standard Languages: Common (PHB) Dwarvish (PHB) ...


34

Latin (and to some extent Greek) used to be the lingua franca during the middle ages. Later on, French became the language of diplomacy and nobility. Everyone that mattered(1) speaks a local variation of said language which should still be understandable by another speaker. For example, Quebecois and French or American and English. So, you could have ...


34

Thieves' Cant isn't a written language, thus there would be nothing to understand via a spell. Nowhere in the quote you've pulled (or the PHB) is thieves' cant ever described as a written language. This is because thieves' cant is both verbal and physical communication. Some word substitution (1 to 1) is used, but it is largely based on metaphor and ...


34

No, the character with the actor feat cannot converse in a language they don't know. Faithfully mimicking the sounds of an orc is definitely fair game. Conversing even in a rudimentary way in a language they don't know is essentially getting all languages for free, and is not included with the feat. The player has misinterpreted "speech" The actor feat ...


33

The PHB explains it on page 123: Some of these languages are actually families of languages with many dialects. For example, the Primordial language includes the Auran, Aquan, Ignan, and Terran dialects, one for each of the four elemental planes. Creatures that speak different dialects of the same language can communicate with one another.


33

RAW is unclear, but Sage intent seems to require a common language As you've noted, RAW doesn't provide enough detail to answer this by itself. Sage Advice doesn't have anything specifically answering this, but there are some related questions that illuminate the intention behind Thieves' Cant: Can Comprehend Languages understand Thieves’ cant? ...


33

Thieves' cant is not a language but it's treated as one mechanically It's a class feature (though I'm not sure anyone's debating this) because it's detailed in the list of a Rogue's class features. Beyond that... I think you've hit one of those places where the game rules have attempted to fit a round peg into a square hole. Mechanically the way the rules ...


32

One thing that I have heard very good reports of is this from a larp event called Captain Dick Britton in The Voice Of The Seraph: If you have a skill in a particular language, then you can both speak it, read it, and write it. By default, everyone talks in English. Please adopt whatever accent is appropriate. To speak in German, prefix whatever you’re ...


32

There is no limit, because languages can be learned during downtime From the SRD section on Downtime Activities, under Training: You can spend time between adventures learning a new language or training with a set of tools. Your GM might allow additional training options. First, you must find an instructor willing to teach you. The GM determines how long it ...


32

Spells aren't written in any language The rules for copying spells into your spellbook states: Copying a Spell into the Book. When you find a wizard spell of 1st level or higher, you can add it to your spellbook if it is of a spell level you can prepare and if you can spare the time to decipher and copy it. Copying that spell into your spellbook involves ...


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