60

The range of Scrying is "self", so the caster targets him/herself first The spellcasting rules says that the target must be withing range: The target of a spell must be within the spell's range However, range of Scrying is "self", so initially the caster is targeting self, not the creature he/she is scrying: Scrying 5th-leveI divination ...


43

Cover is concerned with what is between you and your target, nothing more, so it doesn't matter if eldritch blast shoots straight or wibbly wobbly. The rules for cover state: Walls, trees, creatures, and other obstacles can provide cover during combat, making a target more difficult to harm. A target can benefit from cover only when an attack or other ...


29

A wall of force blocks magic by granting total cover. Although this is an old question, I discovered a relevant ruling while researching another question, and would like to add it here for completeness. D&D 5e designer Jeremy Crawford, in an unofficial ruling, confirms in a tweet that wall of force provides total cover: Q: could a wizard make a sphere ...


25

Rules as written, no, auras don't require line of effect. There is a general rule, regarding the area targeted by spells, on page 204 of the PHB: A spell's effect expands in straight lines from the point of origin. If no unblocked straight line extends from the point of origin to a location within the area of effect, that location isn't included in the ...


24

Mike Mearls’ unofficial ruling is that Wall of Force does block spells, including lines of effect Quoting Mike Mearls on Twitter: Aug 28Jim Miller ‏@pokereleran@mikemearls Is there a line of effect in D&D and does Wall of Force block it? Mike Mearls – ‏@mikemearls@pokereleran in general, a barrier that stops physical objects stops spells Rulings from ...


21

#2 - Fog cloud would appear on the wizard's side of the wall To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can't be behind total cover. This gives a broad, general rule that covers anything that targets something. However, rules then go on to create a special case that tells you how to apply the rule in a specific circumstance: If you place ...


18

All spells need a clear path to the target unless they state otherwise 5e has eschewed the term "line of effect" in favor of a stipulation that there must be a "clear path to the target" as outlined in the spell targeting rules: To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can't be behind total cover. (PHB 204) ...


15

Yes, lightning bolt affects everyone in its line of effect Creatures do not block line-of-effect, so areas extend through them A line area effect targets all squares (within the limits of its range and shape) to which the effect has line-of-effect. Magic Overview > Aiming a Spell > Area > Cone, Cylinder, Line, or Sphere A line-shaped spell shoots ...


14

Range: Personal or targeted at yourself Cast normally Has a Target entry You must be able to see or touch the target, and you must specifically choose that target. When blind, your only solution is to touch the target. If you are the target, this is automatic. Otherwise, the Invisibility entry of the Glossary provides an option when the location of a ...


13

Nothing being able to pass through the wall makes it count as total cover, and that makes targets on the other side of it invalid spell targets. From "Targets" in the PHB's Spellcasting chapter, page 204: To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can't be behind total cover.


12

Here's the definition of Line of Effect: is a straight, unblocked path that indicates what a spell can affect. A line of effect is canceled by a solid barrier. It's like line of sight for ranged weapons, except that it's not blocked by fog, darkness, and other factors that limit normal sight. A line of effect starts from any corner of your square and ...


12

Total cover and areas-of-effect care about the point of origin, not the caster Dragon's breath goes through two 'steps'; first the spell is cast on a creature which is targeted by a range of touch. The standard rules for targeting with touch applies. Then the affected creature (for as long the spell lasts) can use its action to produce an area-of-effect ...


11

There are three potential interpretations in play here: One interpretation is that visual concealment is necessary for total cover, leaving targets on the other side of a wall of force, or a mundane transparency such as a floor-to-ceiling windowpane for that matter, fully targetable by spells and spell effects, or even mundane attacks (albeit with no ...


11

#2 is correct in this case. The relationship between those two sentences can be resolved as You can't do A. If you try to do A, B happens instead. You can't place the fog cloud behind the unseen wall, and if you try, it ends up in front of the wall instead. But all of these outcomes are appropriate in some cases. The rule about the effect ending up on ...


11

You don't have to see the target but you must have a clear path to it If a spell requires that you must be able to see the target to cast it, it says so. Minor illusion does not say so: You create a sound or an image of an object within range that lasts for the duration. All it requires is that the target area be within range. However, there is a more ...


11

In general, 5e rulings are adjudicated first by following exactly what is written, and second (if what is written is unclear or silent on the subject in question) by the GM. So, my answer is: Yes, but... This GM would rule that yes an eyebite spell could affect through a wall of force (WoF). The WoF spell says that it protects (or, traps) like so (emphasis ...


10

It must be kept in mind that an Antimagic Field only suppresses a spell, it does not dispel it. What I mean by that is that a spell is not destroyed when it passes through an Antimagic Field. Think of it as magical destructive interference localized on one spot. While the magic cast outside of the sphere interferes with the antimagic in the field, the ...


10

It depends on whether your GM thinks you target somebody when you move hex In Chapter 10: Spellcasting there is the "A Clear Path to the Target" section, which states: To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can't be behind total cover. [...] This applies to all instances of a spell targeting somebody - but does moving hex to a new ...


9

Lightning Bolt is has an area of effect; 'line'. From the CRB chapter on Magic: A line-shaped spell shoots away from you in a line in the direction you designate. It starts from any corner of your square and extends to the limit of its range or until it strikes a barrier that blocks line of effect. A line-shaped spell affects all creatures in squares ...


9

Spells may or may not be cast through a Wall of Force. It depends on the spell. A spell effect that physically must travel from the caster to the target cannot be targeted at something on the other side of a Wall of Force. "A Clear Path to the Target. To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can't be behind total cover." Since ...


8

The fireball will explode on the caster's side of the wall There is no requirement that the caster see the target area (the spell does not specify "that you can see") but there is nothing in the spell that overrides the general rule that there must be a clear path from caster to target. From the PHB: A Clear Path to the Target To target something, ...


8

In the scrying spell the line "You can see and hear a particular creature you choose that is on the same plane of existence as you." gives you the range. You can use the spell on any creature, anywhere on that plane, as long as it is the same plane as you are currently on. The use of the word target is simply used to designate the creature you are ...


7

It depends on the DM's discretion Normally, the rules on targeting would seem to dictate that you must have LOS to where you want to move the weapon: To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can't be behind total cover. If you place an area of effect at a point that you can't see and an obstruction, such as a wall, is between you and ...


7

Yes I'll just add some linguistic corroboration to the wording: A beam of crackling energy streaks toward a creature within range. Wordnik defines a beam as: A ray or shaft of light. And a ray as: A narrow stream of radiant energy, especially visible light, traveling in a straight or nearly straight line. And a streak: n. A line, mark, smear, or band ...


6

This is probably a case where a specific rule (for how you select Scrying's target) overrides a general rule (that you must be able to see your spell's targets). The spell has rules about the target, and for it to be of any value to the caster, those rules must replace the normal targeting rules. It's useless to scry on somebody you can already see after all!...


6

You do not need a clear path to the target The familiar delivers the spell as if it had cast the spell. When you Cast a Spell with a range of touch, your familiar can deliver the spell as if it had cast the spell. PHB 240 Since your familiar is casting the spell, your character does not need a clear path to the target. Your familiar will need a ...


5

The general rules for targeting are (PHB p. 204): To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can’t be behind total cover. Fireball does not override those general rules so you must have a clear path between you and the target. However, there is no general rule that you must be able to see the target and Fireball doesn't not impose a ...


5

Spells require a clear line to the target. This concept is covered extensively in two answers on this question: Can a spell be cast through (semi) transparent things? Some excerpts. From this answer: In a podcast, [Jeremy Crawford] confirmed that you can't target enemies with spells beyond transparent obstacles because spells require a connection ...


5

The general rule for targeting states: A Clear Path to the Target To target something, you must have a clear path to it, so it can't be behind total cover. The problem is that, while you (the warlock) can see the target via the raven, Hex is originating from the caster, not the raven. Because there is not a clear path between the warlock and the target, ...


5

No There are no secret rules Under the general rules for spellcasting the target (any point on any face of the 15-foot cube) must be within range (60 feet) and there must be a clear path to it. The rules for Silent Image add nothing to this so you are not required to be able to see the target or, for that matter, any part of the cube. For your specific ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible