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81

Owlbears Screech In 5e: An owlbear's screech echoes through dark valleys and benighted forests, piercing the quiet night to announce the death of its prey. 4e: The 4e owlbear has an encounter power called 'Stunning Screech', and it's upgraded cold-themed variant has a 'Frost Wail'. 3e: No information appears to be present regarding sounds from ...


73

Disclaimer: This answer was written before the addition of the 5e tag. The content below may not be applicable to that specific edition of D&D. D&D 3.5's Draconomicon actually has several examples of dragons having specific smells. It seems to vary by dragonflight color: Black - Smells like rotten vegetation and foul water. Blue - Smells like ...


67

There's not a lot to go on in official 5E materials, but there's a few clues in the monster description which we can extrapolate from. Note that since the default setting in 5E is Forgotten Realms, what follows is Forgotten Realms lore. Unicorns in other settings might be very different. To start, these are regional effects that might apply to a unicorn's ...


62

Spell slots represent the caster's mental limits D&D 5th edition's Player's Handbook, p. 201, under Spell Slots, describes them thusly: Regardless of how many spells a caster knows or prepares, he or she can cast only a limited number of spells before resting. Manipulating the fabric of magic and channeling its energy into even a simple spell is ...


57

Owlbears do indeed lay eggs. One of my personal favourite features of AD&D 2nd Edition is that most every monster entry includes details on their appearance, behaviour, social organization (if any), habitat, and ecology. The ecology notes for the Owlbear in the Monstrous Manual read in part: [Owlbears] are warm-blooded mammals, but lay eggs. […] ...


52

In "official D&D 4e rules"? No. But if by "friend" you mean "my DM", then the answer might be yes. On the other hand, if by "friend" you mean a fellow player, they are most likely yanking your chain. DMs are the ones responsible for deciding details of culture in their games, so it's up to them and we can't tell you for sure. Either way, ask your DM, ...


50

What the Player's Handbook says In Chapter 4, "Personality and Background", the Subsection "Character Details" has a header titled "Sex" that makes the following remarks (emphasis mine): Sex You can play a male or female character without gaining any special benefits or hindrances. Think about how your character does or does not conform to the ...


50

It certainly exists in the Realms, but the sources don't give a reliable sense of how commonplace it is. In a quote in this article, Forgotten Realms creator Ed Greenwood says that there are gay characters in Faerûn: Folks, the Realms have ALWAYS had characters (mortals and deities) who crossdressed, changed gender (and not just to sneak past ...


50

You should be more assertive Can my character have this hairstyle It is your character, so ultimately it's up to you. If you say she has a ponytail, she does. female characters usually do not tie their hair But your character does. She is a combat cleric, she can't allow an unfortunate mistake (like hair getting into her face) to mess things up in a ...


47

They Would Be Called "Magic" A +1/+2/+3 weapon, shield, armor, ammunition, etc. have historically been referred to as a "magic" version of that item: magic weapon, magic shield, magic arrow, etc. (though, Volo preferred the term "magical"). In 5e specifically The Magic Weapon spell (PHB p.257) itself is an example of this nomenclature still being used, ...


46

Gary Gygax (2007): Elves' positive energy makes them immune to paralysis from ghouls Gary Gygax answered exactly this question on a forum in 2007, (typo original): When I devised the ghoul for the D&D game it was most assuredly with non-living energization, that is undead status, that enabled these creatures to exist and hunger for the flesh of dead ...


46

As you noted, according to the PHB: Regardless of how many spells a caster knows or prepares, he or she can cast only a limited number of spells before resting. Manipulating the fabric of magic and channeling its energy into even a simple spell is physically and mentally taxing.... So therefore, spell slots are an abstraction of arcane potential: how ...


46

It's time to talk to your DM. You clearly have ideas about the general shape of your backstory, but you need to know some things that "everyone in the setting knows" and you need names, places and dates that don't conflict with the setting's plots, or the DM's own ideas for their campaign. It may well be that the DM will use your backstory to help develop ...


46

The Forgotten Realms wiki page on gelatinous cubes has the information you are looking for in the "Ecology" section: Gelatinous cubes reproduced asexually by either dividing themselves into two smaller cubes of equal sizes6 or via budding. In the second case, a smaller, rubbery cube was excreted into a side corridor or on a pile of refuse, and left to ...


45

D&D 5e is a set of rules and bits and pieces of lore ideas, but it has no setting. There are no maps of the “D&D 5e world”, no noble houses — nothing except the bits of background on the races. There is no canon setting. There are canonical details for some settings that you can use with D&D 5e, but they are separate and not the default setting ...


45

This question ultimately boils down to this: Can the Tarrasque (even if it has Regeneration) drown? Yes* *: Assuming absolutely everything goes precisely as you expect it to. From the Basic Rules...here's how Suffocation (i.e. Drowning, in this case) works. A creature can hold its breath for a number of minutes equal to 1 + its Constitution modifier (...


44

There is good support that it probably means "shield" or "barrier" or "gate" or the like I agree with Miles Bedinger's answer noting that dwarven words relating to "shield" start with "bar", and that this may be a clue to the semantics. To wit: barak: "backbone, strength, shield" barakor: "those who shield" There are further considerations that support ...


42

A unique and highly unusual new dragon offspring, who is typically sterile The D&D 3.5 sourcebook Draconomicon (2003), p.27 asserts that dragons of different types can produce hybrid offspring: Crossbreeds between dragon species are not unknown, but very rare. A hybrid dragon of this sort is usually left to fend for itself, but on occasion both ...


41

Half-dragon Someone who has strong draconic ancestry, e.g. half their ancestry (one parent, or child of two half-dragons, whatever; someone who was, strictly-speaking, a quarter dragon or eighth dragon might still be modeled with the half-dragon rules). Literally is a dragon, in game terms and in fluff terms, though with a roughly humanoid body shape. ...


41

He's a wizard I mean, he's one of the most powerful wizards the multiverse has ever seen. It's not really surprising he hasn't died of old age-- Clone, for example, is only an 8th level spell and Mordenkainen, if we're using multi-edition lore stuff like the question presupposes, has invented 9th level spells (i.e. Mordenkainen's Disjunction). There are ...


41

The DMG provides insight: they are divine creations. The DMG states on page 11 (emphasis not mine): Quasi-deities have a divine origin, but they don't hear or answer prayers, grant spells to clerics, or control aspects of mortal life. They are still immensely powerful beings, and in theory they could ascend to godhood if they amassed enough ...


40

I wondered this before myself, I found that Wikipedia had most of my answers. The Forgotten Realms is a fantasy world setting, described as a world of strange lands, dangerous creatures, and mighty deities, where magic and supernatural phenomena are quite real. The premise is that, long ago, the Earth and the world of the Forgotten Realms were more ...


40

According to Volo's Guide to Monsters (p.33), Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes (p.29) and Out of the Abyss (p.246), Gnolls are created in the wake of Yeenoghu's great rampages across the planes. Originally, they were packs of hyenas that feasted on the corpses left behind by the great Demon Lord. They now breed true, but it's entirely possible that new tribes of ...


38

It All Started With Gold Dragons The first dragons able to change shape into human form were Gold Dragons. None of the others could. On pages 11-13 of Monsters and Treasures (OD&D, 1974, TSR) there were a total of six kinds of dragons: red, blue, white, black, green, and gold. The only metallic dragons in the game were described as "being a class unto ...


37

The methodology I've settled on is as follows: The creature is the dominant inhabitant of the correct alignment plane (according to the Manual of the Planes). The Greyhawk (default setting for D&D 3.5) cosmology lists the Outer Planes that are keyed to the nine alignments. The creature has the appropriate alignment subtypes - an iconic Lawful Good ...


37

What do they eat To date (5 September 2017) there are no canonical 5e explanations of what devils eat. For earlier editions: AD&D: it did not appear to be addressed. AD&D 2e: they are described as having Diet: None for the least baatezu1 or Diet: Carnivore for the rest. It did not say that they needed to eat. D&D 3.x: devils are outsiders and ...


36

In AD&D, the cosmology of D&D which had gradually developed over the course of numerous publications was codified into the Planescape setting, which focused on adventures on the planes besides the Prime Material. The architecture of the cosmology focused on the “Great Wheel,” the sixteen planes surrounding the Outlands. These seventeen planes, ...


36

5E Realms lore does not specifically address this. 4E Realms lore, on the other hand, does. Their exact origin is subject to some debate, even among the elves. Collectively, the elves are known as the Tel’Quessir6 ("The People"), a title that encompasses Eladrin, Wood Elves, High Elves, Sea Elves, and so on. It is 'widely accepted' that the Tel’Quessir are ...


35

This requires answering a few other, related questions So I wanted to first spend some time declaring my sources: namely, the 2e books Ravenloft Campaign Setting, Darklords, and Islands of Terror, a selection of Ravenloft novels (including Carnival of Fear, Dance of Death, and others whose titles escape me), the 2e and 3.X Dungeon Master's Guide, the 3.X ...


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