New answers tagged

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As long as you can wear it in Wildshape, yes PHB pg. 67 states: Your equipment doesn't change size or shape to match the new form, and any Equipment that the new form can't wear must either fall to the ground or merge with it. Equipment that merges with the form has no effect until you leave the form. This means if you can wear the insignia while ...


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DnD 5e has terrible wording indeed, and it seems that not enough attention was given to effect interactions. I would go back to the old dnd shorthand: "specific beats generic"; the boots are a generic effect (while wearing them, you move at 30). Being grappled, or the sentinel feat, have clear wording and are specific, uncommon situations: these rules are ...


4

Extradimensional Spaces The most sensible way someone might try to lock away such an effect is by isolating it in a pocket dimension such as one provided by a bag of holding or Heward's handy haversack. In these locations, the natural world would not be in contact with the book, therefore keeping its effect at bay until the party is ready to destroy the ...


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Ask your DM In this case, the DM is coming up with a system for pricing. We really have no idea what that system is and you need to discuss it with them and work out the kinks and interactions you're interested in. DMG pricing The DMG (page 135) has a chart for pricing ranges across the various levels of rarity for magic items. If your campaign allows ...


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The arcane focus is a required component for spells that have a M component with no listed cost - there’s no reason they shouldn’t be able to use the apparatus as a focus for itself.


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While I don't think there is a spell that does this exactly, Protection from Evil and Good ("One willing creature you touch is protected against aberrations, celestials, elementals, fey, fiends, and undead."), and (a small) Antimagic Field ("The properties and powers of Magic Items are suppressed in the Sphere.") are good candidates. The guidelines for ...


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This is an illusion, so you're going to have to ask your GM. Here is how I personally understand/rule the armor The Glamour Studded Leather Armor states: You can also use a bonus action to speak the armor's command word and cause the armor to assume the appearance of a normal set of clothing or some other kind of armor. You decide what it looks like, ...


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Talk with your DM Glamoured Studded Leather (DMG, 172) states: You can also use a bonus action to speak the armor's command word and cause the armor to assume the appearance of a normal set of clothing or some other kind of armor. You decide what it looks like, including color, style, and accessories, but the armor retains its normal bulk and weight. The ...


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Lava is a liquid, but it is not harmless. It's up to a DM to determine how harmful. Colloquially, and even scientifically most of the time, lava is a liquid. I don't think that's the real contention in this question. In the case of non-simulationist D&D 5e, it's reasonable to make and use the assumption that lava is a liquid. That means the Ring of ...


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Like many other things in 5e, this is DM's call The Ring of Water Walking appears to be an effect similar to the Water Walking spell, if perhaps a bit less protective. The text of the spell indicates that you can still take damage from using it to cross lava, but it makes no indication of how much damage that is, or how much it might be reduced by, say, a ...


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Damage Bounds On page 249 of the DMG, we have a section on Improvising Damage. On the chart are a few interesting things we can use to determine a damage amount. For a lower bound we can use "stumbling into a fire pit" at 2d10. While yes, the creature didn't fall into the lava pool and only their feet are potentially directly exposed, lava is really hot (...


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Yes, but some items give spell like effects without requiring concentration. See Do magic item spells require concentration?


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You might not be able to turn a staff into a gauntlet. The Shifting rune includes the description With a moment of manipulation, you can shift this weapon into a different weapon with a similar form. While the other text is simply "another melee weapon that requires the same number of hands", some GM's may consider a gauntlet too removed from other ...


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On playing cards as improvised weapons A talis deck (Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 97) (2 gp; 0.25 lbs.) is a "deck of seventy-eight cards, typically made of lacquered paper or parchment, in a wooden case." I couldn't find another mundane deck of cards in official material for this edition.1 Complete Warrior on Table 4–7: Improvised Weapon Damage has ...


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Improvised weapons are mostly left up to the DM. There is very little we can tell you for sure; most of these questions you will have to ask your DM about. Improvised weapon as both melee and ranged A weapon can count as both a melee weapon and a ranged weapon; many throwing weapons do that. An improvised weapon could be likewise—you can slam a brick down ...


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Novak's answer describes all the things you need to cope with, but I think you might be able to dodge them all in this case. I'd suggest pretending that the BBEG had been very careful to position the scrying sensor behind a PC or a tree from the wizard (maybe using some other info to know that was necessary), but have them slip up and the wizard notice a ...


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Yes, there are no rules to forbid such thing. But there would be a lot of work As you could see on the images below, you not only need to add some armor pieces to the breathplate, but also you should need to make holes in it to tackle these armor pieces. Also you maybe should cut it a little bit from the bottom. But your breathplate is an magic item ...


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The rules don't specify, so the literal (only) answer to the question is "If the DM says so". Were I that DM, I would be thinking: Half plate includes a breastplate, and it's reasonable that you could physically replace the included breastplate with the BoPR (possibly requiring trivial modifications to straps etc). This should give you (at least) as good ...


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When Life Gives You Lemons... I agree that using a Retcon to explain the scrying is not going to play out well, but there's more than one way to deal with this issue. What if the Party was being spied on, not by the BBEG, but the BBEG's loyal henchman, who's reporting back to the BBEG via his Palantir (or similar McGuffin). Now (provided that the PCs pass a ...


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Talk to your DM There are no specific rules about armor types being converted from one to another and whether or not this is possible. The Equipment lists seem to indicate that each one is it's own thing and thus suggests that they aren't additive or reductive in any RAW way. Whether or not a DM will allow conversions like this, or how they'll make it ...


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No, there is no water in the flask The Decanter (DMG, 161) description heavily suggests that there isn't any actual water in it when not in use(emphasis mine): This stoppered flask sloshes when shaken, as if it contains water. The use of "as if it" suggests that the item itself is just a decanter. There is no water in it when not in actual use, and the ...


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You can’t attack with a bag of devouring It doesn’t say it can, so it can’t. Nor is there any way in the rules to put any part of an active creature into the bag unless that creature permits it. The bag is really handy for cleaning up after the battle but it’s not much good during.


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The description for Robe of Eyes doesn't say that the Wizard wearer will be aware of things that occur when sleeping. The odds of the wizard being asleep each time the scrying was done depend on watch schedules and such. How long the baddie keeps the scry running each time might have an influence as well. Also, it's only advantage on perception -- not ...


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Couldn't these orbs be positioned behind eg trees or rocks in such a way Wizard could not spot them? So, the orb would be only watching Rogue and merely guess/infer what the entire party is up to. Now if the party moves to open terrain you could mention Wizard sees these orbs.


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Logistics We know the Bag of Devouring has similar dimensions to a Bag of Holding: This bag superficially resembles a bag of holding... Which means the opening is likely that of the Bag of Holding: roughly 2 feet in diameter at the mouth So the players would have to wrestle the creature's arm, leg or head into the opening of about 2 feet, which ...


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The rules are in the part you quote: Magic supplies for items are always half of the base price in gp. And The cost to create these items is the magic supplies cost plus the costs for the components. So, the base price gets halved, but the components are separate from the "magic supplies", and thus are not halved. Also, in page on scrolls you linked ...


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Yes, there's more to it the cost to make a scroll is not half the market price. It is 12.5 gp times spell level times caster level (which happens to be that number most of the time), but note that the rules also state: The creator must have prepared the spell to be scribed (or must know the spell, in the case of a sorcerer or bard) and must provide any ...


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Retcon If a tree falls in a forest and no-one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? You are telling a story about imaginary events that only you (until now) are aware of. You can change your own perception of the events and proceed as normal. I see no reason to tell the party about your thought crime. You could retcon that the baddie has not been ...


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That only matters if a series of things are false. If any of them are true, you're off the hook. Either a) it didn't change the game... If it wasn't written down, it didn't happen - Ryan's Law First, if the baddie has only been collecting information so far, but hasn't acted on it, then this is simplicity itself: The baddie loses that knowledge. Since ...


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Unless your gm disagrees, you would probably be able to do this, As the rules do not specify. However, there are definitely multiple ways to get out, even if you casted silence. It would also not be smart to trap a lich in a small area with you, as that would result in death. So... yes, but not foolproof


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Preface/Aside: It's not obvious to me that your thief's player should be making those saving throws, as opposed to you making them in private. Surprisingly, I cannot find the question addressed here directly ("Does a player know he is failing wisdom saves when scried?") or indirectly ("When do you tell a player they are making a saving throw?") But ...


12

Detect Magic will only detect the Bag of Holding. Detect Magic says: you sense the presence of magic within 30 feet of you. so whatever is magic must be within that distance. The Bag of Holding, alongside the Handy Haversack and Portable Hole, contains an extradimensional space, meaning its contents are not considered to be on the same plane as the ...


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There're two parts to this. They're taken in the order that they appear in the question and have been restructured for increased clarity. "A magic item can be created without meeting its caster level by increasing the Spellcraft skill check DC needed to create the item." Almost. Many of a magic item's prerequisites for its construction can be bypassed by ...


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Cape of the Mountebank (DMG 157) While wearing it, you can use it to cast the dimension door spell as an action. Activating an Item (DMG 141) Spells Some magic items allow the user to cast a spell from the item. The spell is cast at the lowest possible spell and caster level, doesn't expend any of the user's spell slots, and requires no ...


2

You ask two subtly different things. Readying the use of an item's effect to cast a spell is much different than casting a spell. You use "ready" as your action to use the cape's effect to cast Dimension Door if a trigger occurs. The trigger doesn't occur before the start of your next turn, the cape's effect is never used and you may still use it. You use ...


1

Welcome to Stack Exchange! I believe the best way to state that would be: "I ready an action to 'Use an object' to activate my Cape of the Montebank once the minotaur gets in range" If the trigger never occurs than interacting with the item (which is what expends the charge) doesn't happen and the charge isn't spent. Use an Object: You normally ...


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By default, artificers are capable of making magic items in three main ways. Certain subclasses gain additional methods for making specific magic items (e.g. the Artillerist gains the ability to make a specific variety of magic wands with their Wand Prototype class feature) detailed in their class features, but these are applicable to all Artificers: First, ...


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The nuance between these two items is the difference between an item casting a spell and the item having a spell-like effect. The first effect you bring up is casting the Heroism spell once a day through the armor. This follows all the mechanics of Heroism, including duration and requiring concentration as per the spell description. The second effect you ...


5

It would not automatically fly into your hand, however what exactly happens is up to the DM/GM Antimagic Field says the following for Magic Items: The properties and powers of magic items are suppressed in the sphere. For example, a longsword, +1 in the sphere functions as a nonmagical longsword. A magic weapon's properties and powers are ...


-2

RAW: As long as the attack hits another creature, it will return to the thrower's hands. The text for Dwarven Thrower states the following: When you hit with a ranged attack using this weapon, it deals an extra 1d8 damage or, if the target is a giant, 2d8 damage. Immediately after the attack, the weapon flies back to your hand. The usage of the term "...


5

The benefit of the feat Improvisation says, in part, "You gain a +2 bonus on all skill checks for skills you have no ranks in." The description of the extraordinary ability master armorer, an advanced armor training ability, says, in part, "The fighter substitutes his total base attack bonus… for his ranks in [the Craft (armor)] skill…." This reader ...


3

Pathfinder is full of options... sorta. First, I don't believe the fireball trick works. Fireball does not target "one or more creatures or objects" and therefore isn't viable for being turned into a potion. Still, there are some things that sort-of work: Possession. If you can gain control of their body in some fashion, and then take actions drinking ...


1

Firstly, you're not after potions, you're after oils. Magic oils are spells in a rub-on form, for use on objects or other targets that can't drink potions (such as constructs). Ask your GM if you can make oils using the Brew Potion feat, because as written there's no mechanism to produce them, they just appear in the world as treasure. Secondly, oils don't ...


3

Don't silo the animated dead The animate dead spell's description, in part, says No matter how many times you use this spell, however, you can control only 4 HD worth of undead creatures per caster level. If you exceed this number, all the newly created creatures fall under your control, and any excess undead from previous castings become uncontrolled. ...


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It would work while Wild Shaped, if you transform into a creature your DM sees as suitable. As it is only an insignia, it could be attached to a cloak that should be able to be worn in most forms. It would depend on your DM, however, as the PHB states under Wild Shape: Worn equipment functions as normal, but the DM decides whether it is practical for the ...


5

The price to add a non-plus magic armor, shield, or weapon special ability is typically the listed price of that magic armor, shield, or weapon special ability. Thus the price will usually be 4,500 gp to modify your +2 mithral half-plate so that it's +2 restful mithral half-plate. (This assumes no extra costs are mandated by the GM or incurred during the ...


2

To start, the key thing here is Caster level. This is a specific function of a character's levels in a specific spell casting class. Page 208 of the Core Rules states, under "Caster Level": A spell's power often depends on its caster level, which for most spellcasting characters is equal to her class level in the class she's using to cast the spell. (...


3

No rules prevent adding new abilities to—or improving existing abilities of—potions, scrolls, and wands The rules on Adding New Abilities discusses magic items generally and only makes an exception for the weary GM to say no in the case of magic staves ("Because staff pricing is so complex, a GM might want to forbid adding new abilities to staves…"). Thus, ...


1

Technically, Yes. The rules for Crafting Scrolls only require that the spell is supplied for the scroll, you have the Scribe Scroll feat, and that you succeed on your check to craft the item. This means that a level 1 wizard with 11 intelligence could attempt to craft a Ccaster Level 20 scroll of Enlarge Person. Note that since it's a Caster Level 20 ...


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When the Scribe Scroll feat's benefit says, "You can create a scroll of any spell that you know," it's not supplying mechanics. Instead, that sentence serves as the beginning scroll scriber's introduction to scribing scrolls. While that statement is technically inaccurate, this reader is willing to forgive that impropriety and say that it's close enough. ...


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